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Por la gloria!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I found this plant in my garden. My dad just calls it a weed and told me that I should rip it out. I figure that the plant obviously serves some purpose in the world and if it grows naturally in my soil and local climate, it could prove some use in the future.





 

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Sorry About Your Feelings
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Looks like a type of clover early on in its life.
 

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Isnt that Chickory... sorry I funked botony because I was chasing a girl who dumped me for some guy with money.Of course he had money he was the teacher
 

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No, chicory looks quite a bit like dandelion in many ways. I'm quite certain that's a type of clover.
 

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Greetings,

You might try taking a photo during the day when the leaves will be spread out and you don't need a flash. Any plants that already have a flower will advance the ID greatly.

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
 

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Por la gloria!
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
More Pictures

Greetings,

You might try taking a photo during the day when the leaves will be spread out and you don't need a flash. Any plants that already have a flower will advance the ID greatly.

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy




 

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i bet 90% of the guys who visit this post just came here because they saw only the word "weed" on the last post column , and they thinked it was about marijuana.

this plant is from the Trifolium genus , i cant recognize the species. its absolutely useless , rip it off
 

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Greetings All,

I think that this mystery plant is Bur Clover, Medicago polymorpha. This species is very common in California and seems to be a good match for your photos (Thank you Guardian for re-shooting by the way.)

The reason it cannot be a wood sorrel is because the three leaflets are not 'heart' shaped (attached at the tip). Yes, I know there are some exotic Oxalis that are more triangular or sharply cut, but on balance not so much. Also, the clear shot of the stipules (leaf-like appendages at the leaf bases) with their fine spiky points is neither a wood sorrel, nor a clover, Trifolium feature.

If one examines each leaflet, one discovers a small sharp tip extending away from the leaf-blade at the very apex. This is usually a feature of the genus Medicago (alfalfa and black medic, amongst others). I don't know of any species in the clover genus Trifolium, that have this character, their leaflets usually end in a rounded tip. [That may not mean that there aren't any; just that I have never seen/heard of one].

The name, California Bur Clover not withstanding, this common invasive in California is Mediterranean in origin. Certainly the appearance of the spiral, spike-bearing fruits will tell us if I am on the right track.

Most Medicago species have possible food uses along the lines of sprouts. Simply follow the instructions for making alfalfa sprouts. The only caution I recommend is not to eat mature plants (as difficult as that would be) because of the reputation for causing photosensitivity (in animals, so far).

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
 
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