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Born 120 years too late.
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AND ALL the population shifts and economic devastation that a 2-3 foot rise would cause..

BUT...

THERE is no question that at one time the levels were much lower. There are old cities that are being discovered hundreds of feet under water.

So..

Now we flash forward to present day...
MAJOR earthquake deep in the Pacific. No quake damage or tidal waves to worry about, but, the quake opened a fissure in the planet, water is flooding in like water down a bathtub drain. And when it stops... every ocean on the planet is now 100 feet shallower than it was before.

The mighty rivers, the Mississippi, the Hudson, the St. Lawrence seaway no longer have the oceans artificially raising them up.

Every port along the US coast is now a dry dock. Pretty much the same around the world.

Some ocean front homes now have a mile of beach before they get to the water.

How big a hit does world economy take?

How long will it take if ever to get close to being "normal" again?

What will be the effect on the stability of the governments of the world or will everything just ship by air, regardless of the costs?
 

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Hollow earth believer eh?

I actually think we would get shipping going again pretty quickly with floating docks etc.

It would be kind of fun to see all the costal cities turn into islands of buildings next to a mile of garbage filled desert. Could make a fun 'no mans land' for the homeless, raiders etc as presumably nobody would own it at first and it would be a big free for all.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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AND ALL the population shifts and economic devastation that a 2-3 foot rise would cause..

BUT...

THERE is no question that at one time the levels were much lower. There are old cities that are being discovered hundreds of feet under water.

So..

Now we flash forward to present day...
MAJOR earthquake deep in the Pacific. No quake damage or tidal waves to worry about, but, the quake opened a fissure in the planet, water is flooding in like water down a bathtub drain. And when it stops... every ocean on the planet is now 100 feet shallower than it was before.

The mighty rivers, the Mississippi, the Hudson, the St. Lawrence seaway no longer have the oceans artificially raising them up.

Every port along the US coast is now a dry dock. Pretty much the same around the world.

Some ocean front homes now have a mile of beach before they get to the water.

How big a hit does world economy take?

How long will it take if ever to get close to being "normal" again?

What will be the effect on the stability of the governments of the world or will everything just ship by air, regardless of the costs?
For the last 2.5 million yrs the Earths climate has been cycling back and forth between ice ages, and interglacial periods. The duration and severity varies, but the cold periods last around 80,000 yrs, and the warm imterglacials last 20,000 yrs.

As the Ice sheets accumulated accross the northern hemisphere, it ties up a great deal of ocean water, and the ocean level dropped up to 300 ft. While it is not completely impossible for ocean water to drain into a subsurface void, I know of no data to suggest such voids actually exist.

Another factor that affect ocean levels is verticle movement of the continents themselves. They are composed of relatively low density rock, supported by denser rock layers, and a molten rock and metal planetary core. These land surfaces float on the supporting structure, and they are pushed up and down by collitions of these continents. Plus, errosion is always tearing down the land surface and carrying it off.
 

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I love this *****
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AND ALL the population shifts and economic devastation that a 2-3 foot rise would cause..

BUT...

THERE is no question that at one time the levels were much lower. There are old cities that are being discovered hundreds of feet under water.

So..

Now we flash forward to present day...
MAJOR earthquake deep in the Pacific. No quake damage or tidal waves to worry about, but, the quake opened a fissure in the planet, water is flooding in like water down a bathtub drain. And when it stops... every ocean on the planet is now 100 feet shallower than it was before.

The mighty rivers, the Mississippi, the Hudson, the St. Lawrence seaway no longer have the oceans artificially raising them up.

Every port along the US coast is now a dry dock. Pretty much the same around the world.

Some ocean front homes now have a mile of beach before they get to the water.

How big a hit does world economy take?

How long will it take if ever to get close to being "normal" again?

What will be the effect on the stability of the governments of the world or will everything just ship by air, regardless of the costs?
Noah's flood was about the max for "high tide." It turned out to be a good and necessary cleansing of the earth (in more ways than one).

Generally speaking, we can add "rising oceans," current "viruses," and "killer bees" to the fodder that feeds the world's nail-biters, nervous-nellies, worrywarts, dooms-dayers, fraidy cats, and other various and sundry worriers.

 

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Another factor that affect ocean levels is verticle movement of the continents themselves. They are composed of relatively low density rock, supported by denser rock layers, and a molten rock and metal planetary core. These land surfaces float on the supporting structure, and they are pushed up and down by collitions of these continents. Plus, errosion is always tearing down the land surface and carrying it off.
This is really a pretty big factor. During the ice ages the weight of the ice actually pushes the land down even as the sea levels fall, and when they melt, the land rises, even as the sea levels rise.

The whole system is pretty dynamic.
 

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I love this *****
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Hollow earth believer eh?

I actually think we would get shipping going again pretty quickly with floating docks etc.

It would be kind of fun to see all the costal cities turn into islands of buildings next to a mile of garbage filled desert. Could make a fun 'no mans land' for the homeless, raiders etc as presumably nobody would own it at first and it would be a big free for all.
No more 9 to 5 job and all the fishing a man could hope for.

 

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Man will do what he's always done. The strong will adapt and overcome, the weak will perish. Or in the case of the weak nowadays, they will whine and cry until the strong carry them to safety, then the'll cry some more putting the blame on something or someone,make new laws and taxes to prevent it from happening again (profits) and elect themselves the savior of mankind. And we'll be in the same shape we're in today with bigger beaches.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Combat marxism Now!
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Search for:

"ringwoodite and wadsleyite" , it might tie into your story....

Also look up "Axial Precession" The North pole changes it's orientation completely every 13,000 years (26,000 for full cycle) and when in the year (month) the north hemisphere is oriented towards the sun. Take into account the elliptical orbit of Earth and the northern hemisphere really heats up when the north pole is tilted towards the sun (summer) and we are at the closest (Earth-sun) point in the orbit. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axial_precession

What a surprise that we are heading towards this time and warming up....


Remember the Northern hemisphere has the most land mass, and is therefore has the greatest solar heating effect.
 

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Why do you ask? 2 Dogs!
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I guess I'd swirl around in the vortex saying good bye cruel world....:D:


I think it would be devastating depending on how much
 

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The Power of the Glave
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The number one rule about climate is that it CHANGES.

The "big" ice ages lasted several thousand years. The most recent one gradually coming to an end about 8000 years ago, when the ice sheets retreated from Scandinavia.

But in addition to the "long-term" ice ages, there have been short-term ones lasting a couple of centuries.

There was one from about AD 500-800. And then another one from about the 14th century to the early 18th.

We currently are in a "warming" period. That might last until about after 2100 or so.

Thus--there is NO need to panic. The climate by its very nature is naturally variable. Get used to it!
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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Discussion Starter #12
OTHER THAN a BIG slow down from foreign goods for a while,
I think the economy would go like WWII except on steroids..

With none of the infrastructure destroyed, with ships still in the water..
there would literally be MILLIONS of jobs created costing BILLIONS of $$$ to build to get back to the oceans, whether making elevated roadways, massive piers or even rail lines out to where they can start shipping again.
AND
There would be no need for masses to leave their countries to find work because every nation on the water would be begging for workers.

Stock markets would go down until someone realized there were whole new opportunities to make billions in the new projects.

Some of the island nations and states may suffer for a while but airlines would be the NEW "Berlin airlift" with every plane and pilot flying their wings off.

As someone said.. we are humans, we overcome, that is what we do.

Would make for interesting and for some very prosperous times.
 

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AND ALL the population shifts and economic devastation that a 2-3 foot rise would cause..

BUT...

THERE is no question that at one time the levels were much lower. There are old cities that are being discovered hundreds of feet under water.

So..

Now we flash forward to present day...
MAJOR earthquake deep in the Pacific. No quake damage or tidal waves to worry about, but, the quake opened a fissure in the planet, water is flooding in like water down a bathtub drain. And when it stops... every ocean on the planet is now 100 feet shallower than it was before.

The mighty rivers, the Mississippi, the Hudson, the St. Lawrence seaway no longer have the oceans artificially raising them up.

Every port along the US coast is now a dry dock. Pretty much the same around the world.

Some ocean front homes now have a mile of beach before they get to the water.

How big a hit does world economy take?

How long will it take if ever to get close to being "normal" again?

What will be the effect on the stability of the governments of the world or will everything just ship by air, regardless of the costs?
the earth is filled with molten magma. A giant hole would have magma coming up and solidifying when it hit the water.
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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Discussion Starter #15
the earth is filled with molten magma. A giant hole would have magma coming up and solidifying when it hit the water.
IT IS not meant to be a geology lesson.

IT is a hypothetical for what kind of effect, and what kind of response would be required for the shifting reality of the "new world.

IT is kind of what preppers do.
 

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The scenario you paint doesn’t seem possible. Below the earth crust the magma is fluid, very heavy and under pressure. Water will not be able to displace it. Magma will fill whatever gap is produced.

That said, areas with abundance of water can go bone dry over time. I looked at rock paintings in the Kalahari desert made by presumably the San peoples of crocodiles and hippos. There wasn’t a drop of water for many hundred of miles in any direction, let alone rivers and lakes where these animals live.
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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Discussion Starter #17
Huge Underground Reservoir Holds Three Times as Much Water as Earth’s Oceans

Huge Underground Reservoir Holds Three Times as Much Water as Earth’s Oceans

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/artic...r-holds-three-times-much-water-earths-oceans/

Earth is a jewel of the solar system, painted blue by the vast oceans that hold the majority of our planet’s water—or so we thought. Most of Earth’s water, according to a new study, may actually be locked in a reservoir 400 miles underground.

REst at site..



IF there can be that much water that deep, why could there not be more?
 

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Go scuba diving off the coast of Alabama, in about 80’ of water you can swim along an ancient river channel and look at the fossilized remains of cypress trees.

Go diving off the coast of South Carolina, in 80-100’ of water in certain areas you can find tree stumps and fossils of land mammals.

Friend of mine lives 70 miles inland from the coast. He was having a well dug, at 75’ deep there were sharks teeth coming up.

They’ve just recently found fossilized shark remains deep inside Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

Scientists doing scanning surveys think they’ve found a sunken city near Cuba. If my memory is correct it’s around 1000’ underwater.

Illinois and Indiana used to be covered by glaciers.

Pretty clear we’ve had drastic temp changes and sea levels in the past.
 

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Or the fissure opens up... an ocean's worth of water drains, then it erodes to the core... suddenly "billions and billions" of tons of water are superheated and flash to steam. The planets explodes like the Death Star did to Alderaan.
 
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