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Hello
I just got my 55agl drums for my water storage I am using calcium hypochlorite (pool shock) Just wanted to know if I had figured the amount right.For 55 gal I would use 25teaspoons full?? also was wondering if I should use candle wax or plastic wrap to seal caps?? Thanks
 

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I am brand new to this forum as this is my first post, but I have done some research on this very subject lately and what I discovered is that it requires much less than what you suggest to disinfect 55 gallons of drinking water.

Here is what I have found:
Using granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water is a two step process.

The first step is to use some of the granulated calcium hypochlorite (or pool shock) to make a "chlorine solution" which will then be used to add to the water to disinfect it. In order to make the solution, you should use one (1) heaping teaspoon of the 78% calcium hypochlorite to two (2) gallons of water, (or use half that much to one gallon of water). Mix this in until the calcium hypochlorite is dissolved.

The next step is to then add some of the solution you just made into the water to be treated. The mixture should be one part of the newly made chlorine solution to 100 parts of water. So, if my math is correct, you should use about 1/2 (.5) gallon of the chlorine solution to 50 gallons of water to be treated.

Your suggested use of 25 teaspoons full would treat something like 5,000 gallons or so.

I'm a newbie, therefore there is a good chance I could be wrong, but others will no doubt chime in to add their expertise to your question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Wind breaker ( did you get that handle by breaking wind:) :)I think your math is right on! I am using well water so I do need to treat it.
 

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No!

The pool shock (calcium hypochlorite) is used to make a bleach solution, and then you use that to dose the water you want to sterlize.

Here's one article discussing this usage:

http://readynutrition.com/resources/better-than-bleach-use-calcium-hypochlorite-to-disinfect-water_19062010/

Their recommendation is

  • To make a stock of chlorine solution (do not drink this!) dissolve 1 heaping teaspoon (about one-quarter of an ounce) of high-test (78%) granular calcium hypochlorite for each two gallons (eight liters) of water.
  • To disinfect water add one part of the chlorine solution to 100 parts water to be treated.
  • Let the mixture sit for at least one-half hour before drinking.

I've read other advice which suggests one teaspoon to a gallon of water, then a few drops of that solution to disinfect a gallon of water. If I get a chance, I'll add some other sources--but what you should do is some research on the internet about this.

Regardless, what your formula above will do is create 55 gallons of BLEACH, which I do not think you want to drink.

Edited to add:

This is from Rawles' SurvivalBlog site:

JWR Replies: Calcium hypochlorite is available from any swimming pool supply company. A granular (dry powder) "pool shock" product that lists only Calcium Hypochlorite as the active ingredient should be safe to use for water purification. The problem with other varieties is that they include other algaecide or fungicide chemicals that are probably not safe for human consumption. Ditto for using liquid bleach for the same purpose. With those, you want to buy plain Calcium Hypochlorite bleach. Do not buy bleach with fabric softeners, scents, et cetera. Keep in mind that bleach solutions break down and weaken with time (anticipate a 24 month shelf life), but that dry granular bleach stores indefinitely. Here is a quote from an EPA web site: "Granular Calcium Hypochlorite. Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately 1/4 ounce) for each two gallons of water [to create a chlorine disinfecting solution]. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 mg/L, since the calcium hypochlorite has an available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 oz.) of stock chlorine [solution] to each 12.5 gallons of water to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the water..."
 

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Best way of knowing would be to test the water. A simple kit costs~$10.
http://www.google.com/products/cata...=X&ei=6twiTsnVMsbx0gHz-7zMAw&ved=0CJABEPMCMAg

I make potable water for a living and I could never use a 'formula' to keep the residual chlorine in range. With testing you are in more control and know for sure that the water is safe. Just keep the level between .5ppm and 3ppm and you'll be fine.

Unknown water sources can run the gambit of what's needed to kill everything. Using a formula might leave not enough or too much residual chlorine.

Who knows, without testing.
 
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This topic has been discussed in depth here

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=214

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=115642

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=1341

List of threads about water storage - http://www.survivalistboards.com/tags.php?tag=water+storage

List of threads about calcium hypochlorite - http://www.survivalistboards.com/tags.php?tag=calcium+hypochlorite

Survival topics had posted an indepth article on the topic, but I can not find the article on the survival topics website.
 

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Since I live alone in a 2 bedroom apt. I don't have room for a 55gal. drum of water. So, I've been buying those 5gal plastic bottles at Wal-Mart and filling them up at one of those water stations that charge by the gallon. Can anybody tell me if those plastic bottles are good for long term storage (over a year)? AND, when I get ready to use the water does it need to be treated in any way? I'm new to prep'n myself so all this is new ground I'm plow'n.
 

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Thanks Wind breaker ( did you get that handle by breaking wind:) :)I think your math is right on! I am using well water so I do need to treat it.
Hey Tracker, you're correct, but let me put it this way. For the last two months or so, the temperature here in Texas has been near or over 100 degrees every day and rain is only about 10% of what it usually is. So, its plenty hot outside. The Wind Breaker handle I use is not cause I'm always wearing a jacket... :)
 

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Hey Tracker, you're correct, but let me put it this way. For the last two months or so, the temperature here in Texas has been near or over 100 degrees every day and rain is only about 10% of what it usually is. So, its plenty hot outside. The Wind Breaker handle I use is not cause I'm always wearing a jacket... :)
I think he was talking more about 'passing gas'.:eek::
As in breaking wind.
 

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Are you actually my ex-wife?:D:
I don't personally know you, but I am VERY sure that I am not your ex-wife.

No, the Wind Breaker handle comes to me fair and honest. I have been known to frighten dogs and small children with "sudden loud noises" and the occasional SBD.
 

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No, the Wind Breaker handle comes to me fair and honest. I have been known to frighten dogs and small children with "sudden loud noises" and the occasional SBD.
Put us both together and we could play a concert! We could open with "dueling bungholes." :D: :D: :D:

My friends have teased me for years about being a walking methane refinery.
 

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Since I live alone in a 2 bedroom apt. I don't have room for a 55gal. drum of water. So, I've been buying those 5gal plastic bottles at Wal-Mart and filling them up at one of those water stations that charge by the gallon. Can anybody tell me if those plastic bottles are good for long term storage (over a year)? AND, when I get ready to use the water does it need to be treated in any way? I'm new to prep'n myself so all this is new ground I'm plow'n.

I do this. I have about 10 of them in a bedroom and more scattered around the house.

They get used pretty regularly so I rotate them in. Such as I will make beer and use 5-10 gallons or go camping I will go through 2 or 3 of them. Next time I go to the store I fill them up.

Been doing this for years and never had one burst. The 5 gallon also seem to be a lot sturdier than the 1 gallon containers but even with 1 gallons containers I have about 20 or so and never had a problem with on bursting in years.

As far as treating them as long as they are capped you should be fine but like I said I use mine and keep a good rotation going.
 

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Since I live alone in a 2 bedroom apt. I don't have room for a 55gal. drum of water. So, I've been buying those 5gal plastic bottles at Wal-Mart and filling them up at one of those water stations that charge by the gallon. Can anybody tell me if those plastic bottles are good for long term storage (over a year)? AND, when I get ready to use the water does it need to be treated in any way? I'm new to prep'n myself so all this is new ground I'm plow'n.
Why not just fill them from your sink? I have 4 of the 7 gallon containers. I filled them with tap water and added 8 drops of bleach per gallon. From what I have read on this board they will be good for about 6 months, then need to be rotated and refilled and re-treated. The chlorine breaks down over time, whether it is pool shock or regular bleach. The advantage to having pool shock on hand is will last until it is mixed with water, and only then starts to degrade.

That is my understanding, someone feel free to correct me if I am wrong.
 

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Why not just fill them from your sink? I have 4 of the 7 gallon containers. I filled them with tap water and added 8 drops of bleach per gallon. From what I have read on this board they will be good for about 6 months, then need to be rotated and refilled and re-treated. The chlorine breaks down over time, whether it is pool shock or regular bleach. The advantage to having pool shock on hand is will last until it is mixed with water, and only then starts to degrade.

That is my understanding, someone feel free to correct me if I am wrong.
Bleach solutions loose potency over time, because it's such a high concentration. Normal household bleach (6% solution) looses half it's strength in ~ 6 months. The industrial strength stuff (12%) looses half it's strength in 3 months.

Chlorine, at levels for potable water (1-3 ppm), and kept out of sunlight, would remain fairly the same over a years time.

If you're using potable water and adding some bleach I'd suspect it would still have a residual after several years.

I really don't have any physical evidence of the latter since I've never stored water. I'd suggest those that do 'store' water to get a test kit and check. If low a little more chlorine added would fix the problem.

Just aim for the high end (of 3ppm) for stored water. That way if you need it the chlorine level wouldn't be to high and be ready for immediate consumption.
 
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