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Shield Up Sword Drawn
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I just received the latest Cheaper Than Dirt catalog. For all that do not have a water storage system here is a temporary fix. You place the bladder in your bath tub and fill with 100 gallons of water. It is only $20.00.

If your water gets cut off you are out of luck but if you have a well and a generator you can refill it when it runs low.


This would make a great gift for people you know that do not prepare. If something happens at least you will know that they at the least have a chance at dehydration.

The next gift for them, Bag-O-Rice In A Bucket by Ronco. Seriously, you gave them water and rice. That combined with the stuff they have on the shelves like soup or sauces can possibly give them enough time to weather whatever storm is brewing.
 

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Looks like rain to me.
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I think they are worth having. I got one earlier this year. It's a one time use thing, I'm not sure if it could be dried out. The material is pretty thin. But for bugging in during a short term emergency, it's handy.
 

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there is a thread already here about that bladder, heard it wasent as good as people thought.
 

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I don't need anything like that,but,wouldn't it be smarter to have a designated frame for it and fill the bath up as well?.
 

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I think it was designed for sheeple in apartments or places without the ability to store large quantities of water or frames for large quantities of water.
 

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I have thought about getting a couple of those. The thing that concerns me is that if it can hold 100 gallons, that is over 800lbs of weight. My bathroom is on the second floor, and I don't know if I want to put that kind of load on the floor joists. I sure would like an opinion from someone who knows building structure limits before doing this. I guess it is probably less than a waterbed. almost 1/2 ton seems like alot.
 

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I have thought about getting a couple of those. The thing that concerns me is that if it can hold 100 gallons, that is over 800lbs of weight. My bathroom is on the second floor, and I don't know if I want to put that kind of load on the floor joists. I sure would like an opinion from someone who knows building structure limits before doing this. I guess it is probably less than a waterbed. almost 1/2 ton seems like alot.
It's designed to go in a bathtub, which can already hold the water. Unless you're talking about using it without the bathtub?
 

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Wouldn't you have to assume you KNOW exactly when the water was going to be cut-off. How many times has the water or electric company saying BTW...at 2:30 PM on Dec 21 we will have an emergency and water/electric won't work for days?
 

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Interesting, and probably worth having on hand. I would not know when the best time to fill it would be. My life, by habit, revolves around the weather forecast. Talk of ice storms, hurricane, blizzard, potential black outs, the tub gets filled for toilet flushing, dish washing, etc. Utility water. I have on hand six five gallon water bottles for drinking / cooking. I have been without power for up to eleven days, and know the headaches of living with limited water. Funny how aware you are of water when you have to carry it. If that product is a one time use item, which time would you use it? Twenty bucks is certainly not fatal, but it goes against my frugal nature to waste something.
 

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I see a bad moon arising
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I have thought about getting a couple of those. The thing that concerns me is that if it can hold 100 gallons, that is over 800lbs of weight. My bathroom is on the second floor, and I don't know if I want to put that kind of load on the floor joists. I sure would like an opinion from someone who knows building structure limits before doing this. I guess it is probably less than a waterbed. almost 1/2 ton seems like alot.
Some of the numbers I'm finding aren't adding up.

Residential code calls for "live load" (weight of random stuff after
the weight of the building itself is taken into account) to be 30 pounds
per square foot for bedrooms, and 40 for living rooms. Didn't find anything
specifically for bathrooms.

Standard bathtub is 2.5' x 5.0', so 12.5 square feet. Times say 40 pounds
per square foot is 500 pounds. Note that if the live load rating is somewhat
exceeded, you don't immediately get a structural failure. The beams just
bend more than you would like, possibly cracking sheetrock and causing
other cosmetic issues. There's plenty of safety factor beyond that
40 pounds per square foot.

But at 8.35 pounds per gallon, you're right, the 100 gallon bag comes
in at well over 800 pounds, getting up well past the live load rating.

However, I found a source that says a standard bathtub only holds
36 gallons of water. That's 300 pounds, so well under the load limit,
which makes sense.

Looks like the 100 gallon water bag can expand far larger than your
standard size bath tub. Larger tub = larger footprint = more allowable
load based on pounds per square foot.

I'd say you would be safe to fill the bag up however you could support
it, as long as you didn't concentrate the load too much. Keep the
height of the bag at around 18" or so (whatever the height of a tub is)
and you should be distributing the load just fine.

Now, figure out some way to constrain the bag into a more vertical
configuration and concentrate that 800 pounds in only a few square
feet of floor space, and you might just find a way to punch through
your floor joists. :D:
 
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