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Preparing since 1972
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In my neck of the woods creeks that have water in them off and on for about 70% of the year are pretty common. I was thnking that digging a good sized hole ( 15 ft deep and 50 ft long ) right in the creek bed would collect and hold water to last for the dry spells.
Any thoughts on this idea from anyone ?
Depends if your potential area is a serious runoff area....IF there is a major waterway nearby any diversion of your creek could be a problem with the Army Corps of Engineers.......ALSO Every area has an office called NRCS Natural Resource Conservation
Service.....IF you call them they can answer your questions about if your area would be good for a pond.....They will come out and even dig test holes to see if the area will collect and store enough water...They also do soil sampling for this purpose...Best of all it is a FREE service to all.....I went thru this with them before i dug a small pond for trout.........I also had called out Fish and Game and they gave me ideas.....When i thought i had an algea problem in 2008 i called Fish n Game again and they tested the water ect and it was a perfect enviroment for aquatic and wildlife species......These two agencies i highly recommend...Good luck on your pond......
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Before you build anykind of pond or dam on a flowing streambed, be sure to check the legal requirements and comply exactly. Be a shame to spend the money for a nice pond and have the gov't come and plow and doze it away, and bill you for it.
The area I am thinking about is not far from a major river. I can't see how making one spot in a creek bed a little deeper than usual to hold water in a dry spell could hurt anything.
 

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The area I am thinking about is not far from a major river. I can't see how making one spot in a creek bed a little deeper than usual to hold water in a dry spell could hurt anything.
You will be ok if you are just making it deeper....The thing the Army Corps Of Engineers frowns upon is when you divert the water in other directions contrary to the main/natural flow of the water..........He is right in advising you of that......Also technically you cannot introduce any aquatic life that is not native to the area..For example if in your area you have bass fish and introduce another species like walleye.....It is alot of fun building a pond....Keep us posted on your progress.....
 

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The area I am thinking about is not far from a major river. I can't see how making one spot in a creek bed a little deeper than usual to hold water in a dry spell could hurt anything.
Sometimes it's not a major impact, but if someone notices it can cost you dearly. One of my parents neighbors did something similar to feed a small pond in the back yard and while the pond was filling someone noticed that the water downstream wasn't quite up to is normal volume and decided to trace the source of the problem.

Even though water flow would have returned to normal after the pond was full, the fines were astronomical, and I mean astronomical. Their pond was nowhere near the volume you're talking about. Someone would surely notice the water stopping downstream while filling up a 15' deep x 50' long pool. It would be very wise to find out the legal requirements first.
 

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Personally I would put a hand pump well right beside it. Driving 25' pipe beats the hell out of digging 15' down and 50' long.
 

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Personally I would put a hand pump well right beside it. Driving 25' pipe beats the hell out of digging 15' down and 50' long.
Again, check local legal requirements. There are few things as contentious as water rights, law suits go on for years, and fines are expensive at best. Usually wells must be permitted by the County or some other gov't agency before drilling.
 

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Use a water pump to pump the water from the creek to a holding tank. Here is an example setup - sorry about the poor video quality.

Instead of a 110 volt pump, you can use a solar powered trickle pump.


 
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I'd say just dig the hole...Don't go overboard and don't damn the creek.
You might be surprised to find it will fill itself, during the dry season, from groundwater seepage.
 

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Silt will be a problem with any water project.

Better to build the pit right beside the creek and put up some gabians(rock-filled wire baskets) and meshing between your pool and the creek. Also not a bad idea to build cinderblock wall around your pool to stop erosion.

Anyways the major problem is mud and silt.

Best bet is just to get your hands dirty and try stuff out.
 
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