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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive spoken to a two water treatment companies in my area and didnt get the impression they really understood what i was after plus the systems they wanted to sell were fairly expensive. $3,000 - $4,000.

I ended up speaking with a friend of a friend who told me the only way to get rid of Chloramine is with an Activate Charcoal filter. If this is accurate i was thinking about putting one on my main water supply. My main purpose is to filter out the drinking/cooking water and the showers. I have two showers that had both shower heads and hand showers so i would prefer to use an entire house filter system versus a type of filter just for the shower heads.


Any know of a decent whole house filter for Chloramine?
 

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You really don't need a whole house filter for chloramines. A simple single stage carbon filter at your sink is probably the easiest way to go. Some, like the pur water filters attach to your existing faucet. Even a Brita filtered pitcher will work in a pinch. A more complex system would be a one or two stage under the sink filter system with a separate faucet for drinking and cooking water.

There are whole house water filters but they are usually overkill. You don't need it for showering, flushing toilets or washing clothes. Just the water you ingest.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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An R/O system added to the kitchen sink, which includes several stages of activated carbon will remove the Chloramine.

From what little I understand, you need a longer contact time with the activated carbon to remove chloramine than you get with a typical faucet filter. The R/O system is a very slow process, providing the contact time needed with the carbon.

Under $200 on Amazon. Replace the filters on a time schedule. if you can take a branch of the R/O water to the fridge, you can have clean water for the ice maker and water dispenser there as well.

Trying to treat the entire water supply to the house is not at all practical or necessary.
 

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From what little I understand, you need a longer contact time with the activated carbon to remove chloramine than you get with a typical faucet filter. The R/O system is a very slow process, providing the contact time needed with the carbon.
Carbon isn't like disinfection. Contact time is irrelevant with carbon. What is needed is a slower flow so that the carbon can adsorb the contaminates. Water moving too fast through carbon tends to dislodge the particles that get adsorbed.
 
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We don't use the water from the tap for anything but showering, washing the dishes/clothes. We have a filter on our refrigerator that filters the water for the ice and drinking water but we don't even use the filtered water for drinking either, we use bottled water. It seems like a kind of a waste to filter your whole house unless you're drawing water from a well...
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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Carbon isn't like disinfection. Contact time is irrelevant with carbon. What is needed is a slower flow so that the carbon can adsorb the contaminates. Water moving too fast through carbon tends to dislodge the particles that get adsorbed.
Residence time was the right word. Didn't think I was writing a PhD Dissertation. But the water needs to contact the carbon obviously. and it must remain in contact long enough for the chloramines to transport through the pore structure of the adsorbant. I have taken all the 400 level courses in heterogenious catalysis, mass transport, absorption isotherms , reactor design, etc. Also spent a decade designing among other things TSA and PSA mole sieve beds, activated alumina and carbon bed adsorbers. Wrote some of the programming and used to have lunch every day with the guy that pretty much invented modern molecular sieves.
 

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In filtering like this, you need Catalytic Carbon. It not only filters by absorbing, but it also catalyzes the chlorine into chloride, which is harmless. They have special filters for chloramine. A good chloramine filter will have a peroxide index hovering around 10. Conventional activated charcoal filters have that number around 100. Huge difference.

I would start Googling "Catalytic Carbon Filters"
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My thoughts with the whole house filter was to filter out the showers as well. While im in and out of the shower in 15 minutes my wife takes a much longer shower and we often give my son baths. I was hoping to eliminate as much chemicals as possible. My line of thinking may be wrong but if my son is sitting in water with chemicals wouldnt his skin absorb that? Same issue with a shower. Your skin is absorbing all that water and you are breathing all the steam in from the water as well.

Im not paranoid about germs in the least bit. I just want to eliminate as many chemicals from my body as possible. Thats where the entire house filter comes into play.

Im not in the medical field. Not a biologist or a chemist so its possible that im completely wrong but i feel that the less chemicals the better.


I appreciate all the input and feedback. Ill take a look at the Catalytic Carbon filters.
 

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I've spoken to a two water treatment companies in my area....

...I ended up speaking with a friend of a friend who told me....
You said the "water experts" recommend something...but then the "experts" you actually talked to say they don't know what you are talking about, and the friend of a friend is your only real source of info?

I'm terribly confused here.

According to the EPA and CDC...you know..."the experts"....there is no issue.

Who are the "experts" that said there WAS a problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You said the "water experts" recommend something...but then the "experts" you actually talked to say they don't know what you are talking about, and the friend of a friend is your only real source of info?

I'm terribly confused here.

According to the EPA and CDC...you know..."the experts"....there is no issue.

Who are the "experts" that said there WAS a problem?


You win. Im leaving the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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We don't use the water from the tap for anything but showering, washing the dishes/clothes. We have a filter on our refrigerator that filters the water for the ice and drinking water but we don't even use the filtered water for drinking either, we use bottled water. It seems like a kind of a waste to filter your whole house unless you're drawing water from a well...
Funny, I never worried about my well water, other than having it tested every couple of years. My area was known for good well water. I did have a filter for my fridge ice maker, and the water heater to remove sediment. Now that I'm on a rural water system I have a whole house filter, bought at Lowes. I figure, if the water tastes that bad I don't even want to bathe in it.

Still have a Brita on the faucet in the kitchen. I like my coffee tastin' good.
 

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Whats the difference between Catalytic Carbon and Activated Carbon?
The biggest difference is the surface area contact. Catalytic is very porous and has much more surface area in contact with the water as it passes. Because of this, it also raises the peroxide decomposition capacity or the speed in which the peroxide breaks down (oxygenating the water).

I'm not an expert and the science is deeper than this... hope my laymen definition made sense.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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The biggest difference is the surface area contact. Catalytic is very porous and has much more surface area in contact with the water as it passes. Because of this, it also raises the peroxide decomposition capacity or the speed in which the peroxide breaks down (oxygenating the water).

I'm not an expert and the science is deeper than this... hope my laymen definition made sense.
I disagree. Activated carbon is extremely porous. Adding the word "catalytic" to it implies there are sites on the surface that catalyze reactions. Normally catalysts are a monomolecular deposition of Pt, Pd, Cu, Ni, etc on a highly porous Al2O3 substrate. the porosity can be measured in the lab by running a He absorption BET isotherm. This is independant of any catalytic properties.

I am not familiar with "catalyzed carbon" though.
 

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You want to eliminate chemicals? What is your son's favorite food? Have you read the label on it?

I drink my chloramine water straight from the tap, usually. I have a big tin of vitamin C powder and add a couple grams to each half-gallon. I figure that will get any toxins.
 
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