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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Introduction
Every now and then, I come across a post or YouTube video where someone creates a small "survival kit" inside a water bottle, so I decided to take my own shot at one. Since I am of the mindset that a kit should be built with a specific goal in mind, the goal of this kit is short-term survivability should something unexpected occur during a day hike. The kit provides basic redundancy to my EDC as well as many other conveniences I may not normally need under ideal day hiking conditions, all while trying to minimize size to that of a Nalgene. The kit uses Dave Canterbury's 5 (or 10) C's of Survival as a base and expands from there when possible.

So with that said, let's jump into it. I'll post a quick overview with pictures and then go into a bit more detail on each item at the bottom:

Overview

Outside View: Here's the kit in its packed state. As I mention in my goal, I wanted everything to be internal to the bottle.


Layer 1: 25' of kevlar cord, signal mirror, whistle, super glue, water purification tablets, and 3x Esbit cubes


Layer 2: Misc items vial, mini fishing kit vial, magnesium rod, ferrocium rod, CRKT M16-14ZLEK, pen, Streamlight Stylus Pro, Gerber EAB, waterproof/stormproof matches, Leatherman Rebar, and a Bic lighter


Layer 3: 5x small zip ties, 5x medium zip ties, 1L water bag, extra match striker, 5x Band aid, 6' Coughlan's duct tape, and a 4x4 gauze pad


Contents Overview: All items from this kit, minus 1 contractor bag that I didn't want to remove from the bottle (it's a tight fit)


Inside View: Inside the kit when (almost) packed. The kevlar cord and signal mirror rest on top, with room to spare in the neck of the bottle



Contents Details
Guyot Designs Stainless Steel Nalgene - This is the container of the kit that everything ideally fits into. The general theory for wide-mouth metal bottles holds true here; it can serve as a cooking device or water boiler. The walls are slightly thicker than a Klean Kanteen, which provides improved durability at the cost of weight and capacity. Sadly, Nalgene no longer sells the Guyot Designs bottle.
Considerations: Should I exchange this bottle for a 40oz Klean Kanteen to increase capacity, reduce weight, and gain a better cap?

1L Water Bag - This is the backup container that can either serve to hold water, or if I'm using the bottle for water, can hold the other pieces of my kit. It takes up virtually no space and is surprisingly durable.
Considerations: Is the bag durable enough for repeated stress on the handle? Should i include an actual bag for carrying my supplies?

Water Purification Tablets - I included the entire sealed vial, because clean water is a #1 priority. The water bag mentioned above has a 1L line marked for purification tab usage.
Considerations: Should I include a second purification method in case the pills are bad (besides boiling)? Is there a better method such as filtration that can feasibly work with the bottle kit concept?

CRKT M16-14ZLEK - This will serve as my main cutting device in this kit. While I am not normally a fan of partially serrated blades (because I hate sharpening them), I see a place for them in survival situations. Serrations can be nice to have, and I don't see a situation where sharpening will be necessary should I have to break into this kit. This version of the M16 also features a strap/cord cutter as well as a tungsten carbide glass breaker.
Considerations: Is there a need for a blade larger than 4 inches? Would a fixed blade be a better choice?

Gerber EAB - This is the backup knife, or alternatively, the blade that will remain razor sharp should that be necessary. if you are unfamiliar with this particular blade, it's a very compact yet durable utility knife. I use one as my EDC, mainly because it's cheap (because I have a habit of losing blades) and blades are easily replaced when dulled (since I hate sharpening blades).
Considerations: Is there a need for a redundant knife? Could I get away with just including an extra utility blade for my EDC?

Leatherman Rebar - In addition to the standard pliers, wire cutters, bottle/can opener, and screwdriver bits, the Rebar also has a dedicated serrated blade, non-serrated blade, and saw.
Considerations: Is this more of an urban survival tool? With two blades in it, does that remove the need for one or both of the other knives? Am i better suited with a smaller multitool?

42-gallon Contractor Bag - As is common, I have opted for the contractor bag for my rudimentary shelter/poncho. This by far takes up the most room in the kit. Should a shelter be necessary, I see this being used more as a "quick and dirty" shelter, or alternatively as a method to help waterproof a debris shelter if I have a bit more time.
Considerations: I would like to include one of the Adventure Medical bivy bags, but there's just no room for one. Maybe if I switch to a Klean Kanteen, it would be possible.

25' Kevlar Cord - Honestly, I forget if this is 25' or 50', but I figure I am good with either size. Primarily, this would aid in shelter building as a ridge line if necessary. I doubt that would require more than 15'.
Considerations: What else would cord be necessary for in a short-term survival situation? Should I include 50'? 100'? Would I be better off with a thicker cord?

BIC Lighter - It's a BIC lighter. It makes fire.
Considerations: Am I better off with a stormproof lighter?

Waterproof Storm Matches - In case the lighter fails, I have these matches as a backup. I have several striker pads with them.
Considerations: Do I really need both a lighter and matches? Are there better stormproof/waterproof matches out there?

Magnesium and Ferrocium Rods - These are my last chance fire starters should everything else fail. Most survival situations are made significantly more manageable when fire is obtained. It's a heat source, a signal, and a great morale booster.
Considerations: How necessary is a third firestarter?

3 Esbit Cubes - Not only do these make a great fuel for firestarting, but each cube will burn for 10+ minutes on its own, which is plenty of time to stoak a fire or even boil water directly. The ferrocium rod is enough to light it easily.
Considerations: Is there a better fuel out there? Is 3 cubes too much or too little?

Streamlight Stylus Pro - I carry either this or a 4Sevens Preon 2 (when I haven't lost it) as my EDC. I have had great experiences with this flashlight (including functioning for 15+ minutes in the ocean and successfully finding a dropped watch). It's loaded with 2xAAA Eneloops.
Considerations: Is there a better light out there? Should I go for an adjustable light to increase runtime? Could I get away with a Photon Freedom button light to save on space? What about a 1xAAA light?

6' Coughlan's Handy Duct Tape - The tape comes in a flat roll 6" long, which makes it easy to store along the wall of the bottle.
Considerations: Should I bring more/less than 6'? Should I opt for a safety orange color rather than gray?

Mini Fishing Kit - No, I don't see this actually catching any fish, but I had the room so I threw it in for now until I can find something to replace it. It's a small vial containing some split shot, swivels, and a wide variety of hooks. The outside of the vial has been completely wrapped with fishing line, although I honestly don't know how much.
Considerations: Is a fishing kit even worth it? Should I replace it with snare wire or actual snares? How much fishing line is enough?

Misc. Vial - This vial contains a bunch of nails, needles, and safety pins. As with the fishing kit, I had some space left, so I included it. I have seen a few survival-type kits that make arguments for including a few nails, needles, and safety pins for various repairs and makeshift supplies.
Considerations: Are there any other small items such as these that I should consider? Should I just completely scrap this to make room for other supplies?

Fox 40 Whistle - A signalling/communication device is invaluable in a survival situation.
Considerations: Is there a louder whistle I should consider?

Mini Signal Mirror - Similar to the whistle, a signal mirror is a great tool should you be attempting to flag down help. I am a little skeptical due to it's small size, but no other mirrors would fit into the bottle mouth.
Considerations: How feasible is it that help will be signalled by a mirror? Am i better off ditching it in favor of something else?

Ballpoint Pen - Currently, this serves as a placeholder. I'd like to include a permanent marker along with some bright pieces of paper or sticky notes. Along with the nails, I could leave messages around my area as another signalling method. Alternatively, I could replace the pen with a signalling laser, which could be used similarly to the signal mirror.
Considerations: What would be the best option for added signalling capability?

Mini Super Glue - This is one of those one-use tubes, which I have double wrapped in baggies to prevent leakage. It could be used for quick repairs of gear and/or skin.
Considerations: Should I ditch it or consider adding another tube?

4x4 Gauze Pad - Just in case I have a larger-than-normal injury, I have included one gauze pad.
Considerations: Should I include more than one?

5x Band-aid - For their size, I could probably include more than 5, but if I end up needing more than 5 in a survival situation, I will probably have just gone to the gauze pad.
Considerations: Should I add more? Should I consider gauze wrap, medical tape, or some antiseptic/antibiotic cream?

5x Small Zip Tie - They can be useful for shelter-building or securing gear. For their size and weight, I included 5.
Considerations: What other uses could they have? Should I add more/less than 5?

5x Medium Zip Tie - These obviously have a similar role as the smaller versions. They fit nicely coiled up in the bottle just under the mouth.
Considerations: What other uses could they have? Should I add more/less than 5?

Other Considerations
I will be adding a button compass once I get one.

I am also considering some type of electrolyte or Gatorade powder mix if it will fit, both as a morale booster and to replentish my system over extended hikes.

Adding a food bar just seems impractical, as the kit's not designed to last more than a few days.

I want to add a small pack of Celox for deep wound clotting. For its size and ability to manage otherwise unmanageable gashes, I think it's worth it.

I might add a carribeaner onto the outside of the bottle. It just seems useful.

As is, the entire neck of the bottle is empty, which gives me a decent amount of play room for smaller items, so any suggestions are appreciated. This becomes even more true if I decide to go with the Klean Kanteen.

So with that said, I welcome any suggestions or comments you might have. :thumb:
 

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Great job on a good concept. My only concern is thinking through how to use it and once you need water, everything else must be pulled out and hopefully you have enough pockets for carrying everything. That doesn't look like an issue if you have regular hiking/cargo pants, just a consideration. Some of the pouches that hold these bottles have a side pocket where you could put that contractor bag and possibly even a space blanket...that would provide some additional "cover" to complement your clothing and free up some room.

Keep an eye on those purification tablets. Iodine can ruin a lot of equipment if it leaks out, even in tablet form as it deteriorates. You may want to consider the Micropur tablets...

For a good electrolyte mix, those Emergen-C packets are small and would fit well in the neck of the bottle.

I would probably swap the multitool out for something smaller...something like the Leatherman PS4 or even the little Gerber Dime.

Stick with the Bic; you could probably cover the top so or make sure you have the child-proof version so it does leak.

ROCK6
 

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Great job on a good concept. My only concern is thinking through how to use it and once you need water, everything else must be pulled out and hopefully you have enough pockets for carrying everything. That doesn't look like an issue if you have regular hiking/cargo pants, just a consideration. Some of the pouches that hold these bottles have a side pocket where you could put that contractor bag and possibly even a space blanket...that would provide some additional "cover" to complement your clothing and free up some room.

My initial question was, where do you put all this stuff when you need to fill up your water bottle?

Then I saw this in his post.


1L Water Bag - This is the backup container that can either serve to hold water, or if I'm using the bottle for water, can hold the other pieces of my kit. It takes up virtually no space and is surprisingly durable.
 

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Good job!

I'd ditch the fishing kit. I'm not sure food is really that necessary. I'd add in the electrolytes as you suggested. If you don't have room for a full celox, at least a couple of those tiny packages of Wound Seal (I found it at Walgreens).

I'd absolutely suggest some Mole Skin to help/prevent blisters.

How about a dozen ibropen tablets? Besides pain, it helps with swelling. It might help you walk out.
 

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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #6
Great job on a good concept. My only concern is thinking through how to use it and once you need water, everything else must be pulled out and hopefully you have enough pockets for carrying everything. That doesn't look like an issue if you have regular hiking/cargo pants, just a consideration. Some of the pouches that hold these bottles have a side pocket where you could put that contractor bag and possibly even a space blanket...that would provide some additional "cover" to complement your clothing and free up some room.

Keep an eye on those purification tablets. Iodine can ruin a lot of equipment if it leaks out, even in tablet form as it deteriorates. You may want to consider the Micropur tablets...

For a good electrolyte mix, those Emergen-C packets are small and would fit well in the neck of the bottle.

I would probably swap the multitool out for something smaller...something like the Leatherman PS4 or even the little Gerber Dime.

Stick with the Bic; you could probably cover the top so or make sure you have the child-proof version so it does leak.

ROCK6
In the extreme and unlikely case that I ONLY have this bottle, you are right that holding the contents can be an issue. As Straza pointed out, my current plan is to use either the water bag or the bottle as the storage container and the other as the water container. Hell, I could even use the contractor bag. Obviously, it's not the best situation, and I'd love to include a small ditty bag if possible. It's definitely on the sideline as an option, but other items seemed more vital. As nutnfancy says "SWC: Size and Weight Constraints"

Good info on the purification tablets. One reason I went with the Potable Aqua was due to the high concentration of tablets for the space. Looking at Micropur, it seems their blister packs may actually be a comparable size to the vials. I'll look into it. For now, i'm not too worried, as the vial is sealed. I may throw a small ziplock bag around it just in case (which I did for the super glue for that very reason).

Emergen-C is definitely on my list of potentials. I tried the Adventure Medical Oral Rehydration Salts, but the pack is huge, and the stuff tastes terrible. I have also been considering Electrolyte tablets, but those could have the same terrible taste. I know I can at least tolerate Emergen-C. :thumb:

For the multitool, that's what I was kind of thinking. I have a PS4 as my EDC on my keychain and love it. Do I actually need pliers though if I'll be hiking/camping? That then raises the question of what I put (if anything) in the new space.

Great advice. Keep it coming. :)
 

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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #7
Good job!

I'd ditch the fishing kit. I'm not sure food is really that necessary. I'd add in the electrolytes as you suggested. If you don't have room for a full celox, at least a couple of those tiny packages of Wound Seal (I found it at Walgreens).

I'd absolutely suggest some Mole Skin to help/prevent blisters.

How about a dozen ibropen tablets? Besides pain, it helps with swelling. It might help you walk out.
Yeah, the fishing kit will disappear once I find something that needs the space. For now, it's just a (very) marginal weight increase.

For Celox, I'm looking at the 2g packs. Enough to make a huge difference without eating up too much room. I'll look into WoundSeal a bit more though. Initial searching told me that WoundSeal was moreso for household cuts, but I might consider it if it comes in a size between 2g and 35g.

Definitely adding moleskin. Flat and very useful, especially when hiking. Thanks for the suggestion.

Ibuprofen is another good one. I have a bad knee that likes to act up after 8 or so miles (which is depressing to say as a 23-year-old...), so something for the pain/swelling is a great idea. I have a tube that can hold a few pills, so I may just throw that in instead of the pen and fishing kit.

Thanks!:D:
 

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Kibitzer
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It's just a 10 C kit using a water bottle instead of a bag/pack.

If I was going to carry, it'd be with a good shoulder bag and the bottle full of water.

There's one guy that made a kit out of a usgi plastic canteen set.
He cut the canteen top off, above cup lip, so he could put items inside.
Kinda screwed himself to start with.
 

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I really like survival kits, especially these days when people seem to think the only way to survive an emergency is to have a 30lb rucksack. I think survival kits are great, and I know everyone has different considerations for what they think is important. I'll give you a few suggestions, knowing full well that you and I think differently about what is important in a kit.

-As long as you don't open the bottle, the iodine tabs won't leak. I see no reason to replace them with something else.
-Definitely get a good button compass like you're planning to. This is an awesome site for survival gear, I bought 6 button compasses from them one time, so I could put one in every kit. Tons of other awesome stuff at a fair price too. http://www.survivalresources.com/Products/Compasses.html

-Do not ditch the fishing gear!!! Fishing gear is some of the most versatile survival gear there is and is also some of the most lightweight and compact. The line alone can be used for all sorts of things. Multiple use gear is the best way to save space and weight. And fish are a fairly reliable source of food across North America. I have fishing equipment in every survival kit, even one about this size of an Altoids can. A short term survival kit can turn into a long term one pretty easily.

-Consider some stainless steel wire. Again, I have it in all my kits. It can be used for repairs, snares, etc. I carry floss too, as extra cordage, fishing line, etc. 50 yards of floss is extremely strong for its weight, which is almost nothing and it doesn't take much space. Fishing line, wire, and floss can be formed around contours of the container, so these items usually fill up space that's left unused by blocky objects.

-I like lightweight no-frills kits. To maximize space and utility I look at a couple of things. Multiple use items, and ways to make everything fit. So I get rid of extra packaging which wastes space. Instead of your fire starters, you could include Vaseline soaked cotton balls wrapped in foil. These are great because you can form the cotton balls into any shape. On that note, some tinfoil is a great addition; super light weight, multiple use. Instead of a full size pen, try using a mini pencil. These don't explode or break in a way that makes them inoperable like a ballpoint. And the wood on the pencil can be used as tinder-dual use item.

-Your kit is great. For the size of the container, you could fit a lot more into it if you wanted to. I think three metal tools is too much for a smaller standalone survival kit. They add weight and take up space. I'd carry one knife on my belt or in my pocket, and have one emergency blade in the kit. I'm glad you included a whistle. It's a single use item, but by far one of the most important pieces of signalling equipment. You might think about finding a totally waterproof container for the matches. It's hard to fit a survival blanket into a smaller kit, but they are one of the best pieces of survival gear. I use a rubber band to stick a survival blanket on the outside of kits that don't fit them. That way I don't forget to bring one. Really like your signal mirror too, where did you get it?
 

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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #10
I really like survival kits, especially these days when people seem to think the only way to survive an emergency is to have a 30lb rucksack. I think survival kits are great, and I know everyone has different considerations for what they think is important. I'll give you a few suggestions, knowing full well that you and I think differently about what is important in a kit.
I like the concept of working with a confined space for exactly that reason. While the bottle is in no way light, limiting the overall space definitely changes your mindset.

-As long as you don't open the bottle, the iodine tabs won't leak. I see no reason to replace them with something else.
The Micropur may save a bit of space, or at least be in a better form factor (flat and flexible) for me to work with. I'll at least be looking into it more to see what works best.

-Definitely get a good button compass like you're planning to. This is an awesome site for survival gear, I bought 6 button compasses from them one time, so I could put one in every kit. Tons of other awesome stuff at a fair price too. http://www.survivalresources.com/Products/Compasses.html
That's actually where I got the two I currently have, along with a lot of other gear in this kit. The vials I use for my fishing kit are from there as well.

-Do not ditch the fishing gear!!! Fishing gear is some of the most versatile survival gear there is and is also some of the most lightweight and compact. The line alone can be used for all sorts of things. Multiple use gear is the best way to save space and weight. And fish are a fairly reliable source of food across North America. I have fishing equipment in every survival kit, even one about this size of an Altoids can. A short term survival kit can turn into a long term one pretty easily.
Fair enough. You're the first person to defend it, so I figured everyone else had good reason for suggesting I ditch it.

-Consider some stainless steel wire. Again, I have it in all my kits. It can be used for repairs, snares, etc. I carry floss too, as extra cordage, fishing line, etc. 50 yards of floss is extremely strong for its weight, which is almost nothing and it doesn't take much space. Fishing line, wire, and floss can be formed around contours of the container, so these items usually fill up space that's left unused by blocky objects.
Part of my reasoning for including the zip ties was for just that: filling up the space nothing else would fit in. The inside rim of the bottle has plenty of space still, so steel wire/floss/thin cordage could definitely be added.

-I like lightweight no-frills kits. To maximize space and utility I look at a couple of things. Multiple use items, and ways to make everything fit. So I get rid of extra packaging which wastes space. Instead of your fire starters, you could include Vaseline soaked cotton balls wrapped in foil. These are great because you can form the cotton balls into any shape. On that note, some tinfoil is a great addition; super light weight, multiple use. Instead of a full size pen, try using a mini pencil. These don't explode or break in a way that makes them inoperable like a ballpoint. And the wood on the pencil can be used as tinder-dual use item.
The Esbit cubes are something I'm specifically trying to keep. Their energy density, even with the minor packaging, is far superior to a vaseline cotton ball. I've personally tested that. And they take a spark quite easily. That said, you make a good point about the flexibility of the cotton ball's shape, and vaseline can be helpful in other ways on the trail as well. One thing I have yet to test is any evaporative properties the Esbit cubes have.

Good point about the tinfoil. While I'm not sure what other uses tinfoil has besides as a bowl/pan/reflector, it's weight and malleability would work well in a bottle kit.

As for the pen, I think I mentioned in my first post that it's really just a placeholder and only serves to demonstrate the room I have left. I've toyed with the idea of including some bright post-its in the kit, which would then justify a writing instrument. In that case, yeah, I'll be going for something smaller.

-Your kit is great. For the size of the container, you could fit a lot more into it if you wanted to. I think three metal tools is too much for a smaller standalone survival kit. They add weight and take up space. I'd carry one knife on my belt or in my pocket, and have one emergency blade in the kit. I'm glad you included a whistle. It's a single use item, but by far one of the most important pieces of signalling equipment. You might think about finding a totally waterproof container for the matches. It's hard to fit a survival blanket into a smaller kit, but they are one of the best pieces of survival gear. I use a rubber band to stick a survival blanket on the outside of kits that don't fit them. That way I don't forget to bring one. Really like your signal mirror too, where did you get it?
I wouldn't say i could fit "a lot" more, but yes, there's still some room. The contractor bag takes up a lot of space, so as is, there's virtually no gear shift when handling the bottle. Once I go through and add some of the great suggestions I've gotten so far, I'll have a better indication of how much extra space I have.

Everyone seems to agree that the multitool is a bit much. It is also by far the heaviest and takes up the most space (after the contractor bag). Downsizing it or removing it altogether would free up quite a bit of space.

I see a waterproof match container as completely unnecessary. As is, the bottle is inherently waterproof. The plastic bag they are in is a second layer of protection, and then the matches themselves are made to withstand wetness. A dedicated container really only serves to take up space. At most, I'd throw the matches in a small ziplock bag.

Believe it or not, I almost left the whistle out. I have rarely been on a hike where I haven't found an acorn, which can easily be used as a whistle. That said, I recognize the usefulness of a small dedicated whistle, so it stays for now.

A mylar or emergency blanket is the one item that would truly round out the kit. The size just doesn't quite work though. Given the goal is to have a self-contained kit, it's been left out. Realistically, I'd probably pair the bottle with an Adventure Medical Bivy.

All the items I listed are hyperlinks to a site giving more info on them. Hre it is again so you don't have to go searching: http://www.countycomm.com/microsignalmirror.html CountyComm is anther favorite site of mine for EDC and kit items.

Great advice though. Much appreciated. :D:
 

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You can add a magnetized sail needle and thread and cover two C's right there: compass and canvas needle. Can you fold up a littel bandana and cram it into the bottom? A small amount of gorilla tape wrapped around a card would be nice to have too.

I actually recently made one of these. I put snare wire in mine instead of a fishing kit, because it can also be used as a form of cordage. I'll probably end up throwing this bottle kit in my car since the contents shouldn't be effected by the extreme temperatures inside the car.

What's nice about the 10 C's kits is that they don't take up much space. Your container is typcially your biggest item. Even my 9'x12' plastic drop sheet fits easily into the bottle. As long as you use a small knife you can pack the rest of the little items in there and get all the essentialls in one small container.
 

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That is a nice kit and right up, Xaith. I agree with the people that say keep the fishing kit. The only question I have is why the kevlar cord, as opposed to some good 550 paracord? 550 has so many uses, and have you ever tried to cut any of the kevlar cords?


Duke
 

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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #15
A few updates and suggestions for you all to consider. I actually cross-posted this onto Reddit's /r/survival and got some good advice. I have added the following items:

Sheet of moleskin: Mainly for blisters, but I'm sure an adhesive cotton pad has other uses.

6x Tylenol and 7x Aspirin: I managed to fit a small transport tube in the kit to hold these items. I'm still unsure of the pill types and number, so I'm open to suggestions. I definitely want something for pain and something for inflammation/swelling.

2g Celox: I looked into WoundSeal, but the packets look even smaller than the Celox. I may add a second 2g packet due to the size.

40' of .45mm twisted wire: I want to actually do strength testing on it, but it seemed pretty strong just pulling on it.

Other Considerations:

3x5 Safety orange index cards: Useful for writing on as well as signalling. Takes up no space, and could be used as kindling in a bind.

Filter Straw: Is there a benefit to using a filtering straw for instant water versus the purification tabs that require waiting? The size difference is significant.

Gorilla Tape: Find some way to store gorilla tape on a flat surface like the duct tap I currently have.

Headlamp: Is it worth the additional space to get a small hands-free light instead of a torch? I currently see no need, as I don't plan to be walking around at night should I need to use this kit.

Zip Ties vs. More Cordage: I may ditch the 4 medium sized zip ties for more cordage.

Klean Kanteen vs Guyot Designs: A Reddit user mentioned that the Guyot Designs Nalgene bottles had quality control issues resulting in pitting and bacterial growth. Not sure it'll be an issue for short-term survival, but figured I'd mention it.

Ditch a Knife: A user finally suggested I reduce my number of blades. I've been really looking for someone to give me a good reason to as well. Since I'm downsizing my multitool, that will reduce the count by 1 already. I may also ditch the Gerber blade, even though it takes up no space.

Sail Needle: I'd rather get a good button compass than rely on a magnetized needle. I also have several needles in one of my vials and have yet to be in a situation where a canvas needle would be preferential. i suppose I could throw one in if I really wanted to, but I see no need right now. One of the few Dave Canterbury C's I don't fully understand.

Bandana: Worth considering. I'll look into it. Thanks for the suggestion.

Snare Wire: I'll be testing the wire I have for strength and see if that could reasonably be used for snare wire. If not, I'll be looking to replace it with some that could.

550 Cord vs Kevlar Cord: 550 cord takes up a lot of space, and I rarely have a need for something to support anywhere near 500 lbs. Yes, I could separate the inner fibers, but then I'm better off with bankline or the kevlar cord anyways. Hell, I could just add more fishing line. The kevlar cord I have does cut, so no worries there. I guess my question would be what advantages 550 cord has over other cordage for the same volume/weight? It's size makes it easy to tie/untie, but for shelter setup and lashings, I could probably use anything.
 

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add a photo of your family/loved ones/pet/whatever. best morale booster.

alum foil is also possible to use to melt snow in a dire emergency (over ashes).

is there anyway you can make space there for a datrex 2400cal bar? it always amazes me that food procurement is part of such kits but not food itself.
 

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Bankline is taking over for paracord. If anything, you can add a paracord lanyard or bracelet to the outside of the bottle and you'll have some there. But you'd be much better off with 100 feet of bankline rather than 25 feet of paracord. Takes up less space.
 

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I wouldn't use the water bottle posted. It's better to opt for Platypus bottles which are virtually weightless and take up no space for secondary use. My primary bottle is an All Clear Camelbak, plus a filter which eliminates the need for all of those nasty purifying tablets.
 

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Resurgam.
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122 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Photo of my family: That is definitely a good idea. Thanks for the suggestion.

Aluminum foil: Already on my To Add list. Good to know others think it's a good idea.

Datrex Bar: If the Datrex bars have the same calorie density as some of the other emergency ration bars I've seen, then there's probably no room for it. As is, the largest food item I might consider would be a Powerbar or another energy bar. Even then, I'm not sure I have room unless I remove something substantial (which I might be able to do if I ditch the knife and stick with what's on my EDC and on the multitool).

Bankline: Yeah, the 50' of kevlar cord I currently have is about the thickness of bankline, and so far that form factor is working for me. I just can't justify the bulk of paracord in such a small kit, especially when I would need at least 20' to feel comfortable. I might still get some bankline to test with, because it's certainly a cheaper alternative to what I currently have.

Stowaway Backpack: I searched around for a while to try and find some kind of compressed emergency backpack but couldn't find anything small enough. Stuff sacks and water bags seem to be the best option, especially for the price.

Platypus Bottle: The goal of this kit was to fit everything in a bottle, and since you can also use it to cook, a stainless bottle seemed to make sense. As is, I have 2 (really 3) ways of carrying water. I'm not sure the Platypus adds anything of significant value to my kit. At most, maybe I could replace my water bag with it to gain some additional durability, but I'm not sure I need that.

Thanks for all the feedback! :)
 
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