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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #1
Introduction
A few months ago, I finished a “survival water bottle kit” and posted here for feedback: http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=326255 You guys helped a lot with working out the kinks, so here’s the latest version. As I stated in the original post, the goal of this kit is short-term survivability should something unexpected occur during a day hike or weekend camping trip. The kit provides basic redundancy to my EDC as well as many other conveniences I may not normally need under ideal conditions outdoors, all while trying to minimize size to that of a water bottle. It's also serving as a thought experiment meant to determine maximum capability given a limited space.

So with that said, let's jump into it. I've attached pictures of the contents to give you some idea of scale.

Overview








Contents Details
Klean Kanteen 40oz Stainless Steel Water Bottle - This is the container of the kit that everything ideally fits into. The general theory for wide-mouth metal bottles holds true here; it can serve as a cooking device or water boiler. This is an upgrade from a Guyot Designs Stainless Steel Nalgene, which weighed more while holding less and supposedly has issues with rusting along the seams.
Considerations: I’m not sure there are any here, given that the concept is built around a water bottle. The only two legitimate options I have been given were this bottle and the Guyot one. One slight modification I might do is change to the flat-top lid rather than the round one I currently have. I don’t gain any space on the inside, but it takes up slightly less space on the outside.

42-gallon Contractor Bag - I have opted for the contractor bag for my rudimentary shelter/poncho. This by far takes up the most room in the kit. Should a shelter be necessary, I see this being used more as a "quick and dirty" shelter, or alternatively as a method to help waterproof a debris shelter if I have a bit more time.
Considerations: Based on feedback I got just after taking these photos, I have switched the contractor bag out for an AMK SOL Emergency Bivy and an AMK SOL Survival Blanket.

Ditty Bag – Based on overwhelming feedback, I have finally found and included a ditty bag for carrying all of the gear once it is taken out of the bottle.
Considerations: I'll probably find a better ditty bag when I have the chance. Perhaps something from Sea To Summit.

Medi-Lyte Electrolyte Replentisher (x2) – These tablets are meant to combat fatigue, muscle cramping, and heat stress due to extended exertion and sweating. It also helps with hangovers.
Considerations: How important would this be in a sudden survival situation? Is there a better brand? Would Gatorade powder be just as good?

Single-use Triple Antibiotic Ointment (x2) – Pretty self-explanatory. For small wounds, this provides some basic protection.
Considerations: Should I add more?

Fabric Band-Aids (x5) – Also for small cuts, blisters, and punctures. For their size, they really are a staple of any first-aid kit.
Considerations: is 5 too many or too little? Is there a better brand? Should I consider other shapes?

4x Fresnel Lens – Call it a fire-starter if you want. Call it an aid for dealing with wounds or really anything that requires fine motor skills. It’s flat and weighs next to nothing.
Considerations: I am currently tempted to ditch this should I actually need the room.

Single-use Providone-Iodine (x2) – Used in wound preparation as an anti-septic.
Considerations: Is this unnecessary given the triple antibiotic?

½” x 4” Steri-Strips (x12) – Used for larger cut management and closure. It comes in two packs of 6 ½” x 4” strips.
Considerations: Should I add more/fewer? Should I substitute something better or different for these?

2 3/8” x 2 3/4" Tegaderm – Protection and waterproofing for a larger wound. Very cool stuff, although pricey.
Considerations: Should I add more or replace this with something else?

3” x 5” Orange Index Card (x5) – They can be used for note-taking, trail blazing, or as another type of visual signal.
Considerations: Should I use fewer cards? Is there something better? (Blaze-orange waterproof paper maybe?)

Adhesive Moleskin Pad – For blisters.
Considerations: Is this enough? Is there something better?

2” x 2” Gauze Pad (x4) – For larger injuries and bleeders.
Considerations: Should I try for a gauze roll?

1L Water Bag – The backup container for storing water (or other items if necessary). It’s slightly more than 1L, but includes a 1L line for use with purification tablets.
Considerations: Is there something better for a backup water container?

Match Striker Pads (x2) – They come with UCO Stormproof Matchboxes, so I threw them in.
Considerations: If anyone can actually convince me the space is better suited elsewhere, I’ll consider it.

2g Celox – For serious wounds. Obviously not a permanent solution, but for bigger gashes, this should stop it fast.
Considerations: Should I add more?

Leatherman Squirt PS4 – A mini multitool. Pliers, a blade, scissors, bottle opener, etc. I had a Leatherman Rebar in before this and was convinced to downsize.
Considerations: should I ditch it altogether? Is there a better tool out there?

UCO Stormproof Matches (x25) – From what I can tell, these are the gold standard of waterproof matches.
Considerations: Are there better alternatives?

BIC Lighter – It’s a BIC Lighter. It makes fire.
Considerations: Is there a better lighter out there? Do I need both this and the matches, or can I ditch one?

Misc. Vial - This vial contains a bunch of nails, needles, and safety pins. I have seen a few survival-type kits that make arguments for including a few nails, needles, and safety pins for various repairs and makeshift supplies.
Considerations: Are there any other small items such as these that I should consider? Should I just completely scrap this to make room for other supplies?

Mini Fishing Kit - No, I don't see this actually catching any fish, but I had the room so I threw it in for now. It's a small vial containing some split shot, swivels, and a wide variety of hooks. The outside of the vial has been completely wrapped with fishing line, although I honestly don't know how much.
Considerations: Is there a more practical and/or reliable source of catching food for the size?

Vial of Pills – Included is 6 500mg Tylenol and 7 500mg Aspirin.
Considerations: Are there any other pills I should consider adding?

Pocket Pry Bar – I had room, so I threw it in.
Considerations: Not sure this is practical in the wilderness, so I’ll ditch it if the room is needed.

Magnesium and Ferrocium Rods - These are my last chance fire starters should everything else fail.
Considerations: Are three firestarters necessary?

5-Minute Orion Signal Flare – Assured fire and a bright signaling device at night. Considerations: It’s a bit bulky and truthfully was included as a space-filler. I like the added signaling and fire, but recognize it may not be necessary.
Considerations: What else should I try and fill the space with?

Streamlight Stylus Pro - I carry either this or a 4Sevens Preon 2 (when I haven't lost it) as my EDC. I have had great experiences with this flashlight (including functioning for 15+ minutes at night in the ocean and successfully finding a dropped watch). It's loaded with 2xAAA Eneloops.
Considerations: Is there a better light out there? Should I go for an adjustable light to increase runtime?

CRKT M16-14ZLEK - This will serve as my main blade. While I am not normally a fan of partially serrated blades (because I hate sharpening them), I see a place for them in survival situations. I also don't see a situation where sharpening will be necessary should I have to break into this kit. This version of the M16 also features a strap/cord cutter as well as a tungsten carbide glass breaker.
Considerations: Is there a need for a blade larger than 4 inches? Would a fixed blade be a better choice? I am currently considering the Kabar Eskabar (the Becker/Izula hybrid).

AA Button Compass – A backup to whatever navigation device I have in my main pack.
Considerations: Should I opt for a larger (and presumably more accurate) compass?

Mini Super Glue – For quick repairs and possibly as a liquid bandage (although last time I received a good argument against it).
Considerations: Should I ditch it for something better?

Photon Freedom Button Light – Based on feedback last time, a hands-free light made sense. This is a small button light, with adjustable brightness, as well as several other modes. It comes with a hat/shirt/pocket clip.
Considerations: Are two lights too many? Are there others I should consider?

Fox 40 Whistle – Probably the most reliable and easy to use (and reuse) signaling device.
Considerations: Is there a louder whistle I should consider?

Potable Aqua Water Purification Tablets - I included the entire sealed vial of 50 tablets.
Considerations: Should I include a second purification method in case the pills are bad (besides boiling)? Is there a better method such as filtration that can feasibly work with the bottle kit concept? I may switch these out for Some blisterpack tablets, as 25L of purification doesn't seem necessary.

Uncle Bill’s Tweezers – Another item thrown in mainly because it filled a space and could feasibly be useful.
Considerations: Should I keep it or trash it?

Gerber EAB - The backup knife, or alternatively, the blade that will remain razor sharp should that be necessary. It’s a very compact yet durable utility knife. I use one as my EDC, mainly because it's cheap (because I have a habit of losing blades) and blades are easily replaced when dulled (since I hate sharpening blades).
Considerations: Is there a need for a redundant knife given the main blade and multitool blade? Is there a better backup blade I should consider?

Mini Signal Mirror – Another signaling device. I am a little skeptical due to its small size, but no other mirrors would fit into the bottle mouth.
Considerations: How feasible is it that help will be signalled by a mirror? Am I better off ditching it in favor of something else?

6’ x 1” Gorilla Tape – Wrapped around an old card, I figured 6’ would be enough for most uses I’d have.
Considerations: Should I go for more?

50' Kevlar Cord - Primarily, this would aid in shelter building as a ridge line if necessary. I doubt that would require more than 15'.
Considerations: What else would cord be necessary for in a short-term survival situation? Should I include more? Would I be better off with a thicker cord?

14g Esbit Cubes (x3) - Not only do these make a great fuel for firestarting, but each cube will burn for 10+ minutes on its own, which is plenty of time to stoak a fire or even boil water directly. The ferrocium rod is enough to light it easily.
Considerations: Is there a better fuel out there? Is 3 cubes too much or too little?

25' .45mm Twisted Wire (12lb breaking strength) – An alternative to the Kevlar cordage and could possibly be used for snares. I have quite a bit of space up under the shoulder of the bottle, so I tried this out.
Considerations: Should I add more or less? Is there a better snare-type wire I should consider?

Zip Ties – I have 5 small, 5 medium, and 1 large. Useful for securing gear and in case I don’t want to cut my cordage. Makes a quick and secure loop.
Considerations: Would more cordage be preferable over this? Once again, I had space in the bottle shoulder. Is there something else that could fit here?

Other Items – I currently have the bottle inside one of a Condor H2O pouch. The pouch also holds a blaze orange bandana (wrapped around the bottle). This gives me the entire front pocket to use. My current thought is to fill it with high-calorie food bars. I've been looking at the Snickers Marathon bars for a good balance of calories, nutrition, and size.

Final Thoughts
As always, I appreciate any feedback, as this continues to be a work in progress. Thanks. :thumb:
 

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I've had the idea for something similar. I like it. I plan on using a regular size (20oz-ish) stainless water bottle. If I was you I would ditch the matches. And I would wrap the outside of the bottle in paracord. I'd probably narrow it down to 1 knife also. Overall pretty cool idea. Thanks for sharing.
 

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I didn't participate in the fist post (I think.) But I like this idea, so my thoughts are in red.

Contents Details
Klean Kanteen 40oz Stainless Steel Water Bottle - This is the container of the kit that everything ideally fits into. The general theory for wide-mouth metal bottles holds true here; it can serve as a cooking device or water boiler. This is an upgrade from a Guyot Designs Stainless Steel Nalgene, which weighed more while holding less and supposedly has issues with rusting along the seams.
Considerations: I’m not sure there are any here, given that the concept is built around a water bottle. The only two legitimate options I have been given were this bottle and the Guyot one. One slight modification I might do is change to the flat-top lid rather than the round one I currently have. I don’t gain any space on the inside, but it takes up slightly less space on the outside.
Excellent choice. Get the flat cap.

42-gallon Contractor Bag - I have opted for the contractor bag for my rudimentary shelter/poncho. This by far takes up the most room in the kit. Should a shelter be necessary, I see this being used more as a "quick and dirty" shelter, or alternatively as a method to help waterproof a debris shelter if I have a bit more time.
Considerations: Based on feedback I got just after taking these photos, I have switched the contractor bag out for an AMK SOL Emergency Bivy and an AMK SOL Survival Blanket.
Good choices.

Ditty Bag – Based on overwhelming feedback, I have finally found and included a ditty bag for carrying all of the gear once it is taken out of the bottle.
Considerations: I'll probably find a better ditty bag when I have the chance. Perhaps something from Sea To Summit.
Consider a no-see-um mesh head net instead. Dual purpose and if you need it as a head net, you are really going to need it.

Medi-Lyte Electrolyte Replentisher (x2) – These tablets are meant to combat fatigue, muscle cramping, and heat stress due to extended exertion and sweating. It also helps with hangovers.
Considerations: How important would this be in a sudden survival situation? Is there a better brand? Would Gatorade powder be just as good?
Best brand I know. Good choice.

Single-use Triple Antibiotic Ointment (x2) – Pretty self-explanatory. For small wounds, this provides some basic protection.
Considerations: Should I add more?
Add two more.

Fabric Band-Aids (x5) – Also for small cuts, blisters, and punctures. For their size, they really are a staple of any first-aid kit.
Considerations: is 5 too many or too little? Is there a better brand? Should I consider other shapes?
Loose. You can use duct tape for blisters. Add a couple finger tip, a couple of knuckle, and four wound closure strips.

4x Fresnel Lens – Call it a fire-starter if you want. Call it an aid for dealing with wounds or really anything that requires fine motor skills. It’s flat and weighs next to nothing.
Considerations: I am currently tempted to ditch this should I actually need the room.
Keep. Splinter finder, fire starter, instruction reader.

Single-use Providone-Iodine (x2) – Used in wound preparation as an anti-septic.
Considerations: Is this unnecessary given the triple antibiotic?
Keep. Better for cleaning, where the triple is a treatment.

½” x 4” Steri-Strips (x12) – Used for larger cut management and closure. It comes in two packs of 6 ½” x 4” strips.
Considerations: Should I add more/fewer? Should I substitute something better or different for these?
Lose. More duct tape.

2 3/8” x 2 3/4" Tegaderm – Protection and waterproofing for a larger wound. Very cool stuff, although pricey.
Considerations: Should I add more or replace this with something else?
Keep

3” x 5” Orange Index Card (x5) – They can be used for note-taking, trail blazing, or as another type of visual signal.
Considerations: Should I use fewer cards? Is there something better? (Blaze-orange waterproof paper maybe?)
Get the blaze orange water proof paper if you can find it. If not, 2 cards. Add a bullet Space pen, mini-Sharpie, or golf pencil. Might add a few large, bright color push pins for sticking small pieces of paper/card to trees, etc. A wax marker for rocks if your area dictates.

Adhesive Moleskin Pad – For blisters.
Considerations: Is this enough? Is there something better?
Not better, but can use the multipurpose duct tape.

2” x 2” Gauze Pad (x4) – For larger injuries and bleeders.
Considerations: Should I try for a gauze roll?
Substitute 4" x4 and add a 2" gauze roll.

1L Water Bag – The backup container for storing water (or other items if necessary). It’s slightly more than 1L, but includes a 1L line for use with purification tablets.
Considerations: Is there something better for a backup water container?
Keep

Match Striker Pads (x2) – They come with UCO Stormproof Matchboxes, so I threw them in.
Considerations: If anyone can actually convince me the space is better suited elsewhere, I’ll consider it.
Keep 1

2g Celox – For serious wounds. Obviously not a permanent solution, but for bigger gashes, this should stop it fast.
Considerations: Should I add more?
Debatable. Up to you. Do you know how to use it effectively?

Leatherman Squirt PS4 – A mini multitool. Pliers, a blade, scissors, bottle opener, etc. I had a Leatherman Rebar in before this and was convinced to downsize.
Considerations: should I ditch it altogether? Is there a better tool out there?
Lose it.

UCO Stormproof Matches (x25) – From what I can tell, these are the gold standard of waterproof matches.
Considerations: Are there better alternatives?
Keep. Best I know.

BIC Lighter – It’s a BIC Lighter. It makes fire.
Considerations: Is there a better lighter out there? Do I need both this and the matches, or can I ditch one?
Keep. But get the mini.

Misc. Vial - This vial contains a bunch of nails, needles, and safety pins. I have seen a few survival-type kits that make arguments for including a few nails, needles, and safety pins for various repairs and makeshift supplies.
Considerations: Are there any other small items such as these that I should consider? Should I just completely scrap this to make room for other supplies?
Keep. Lose the needles, add another nail or safety pin. (The nails make tying off to trees ease and will use less cord. The safety pins for clothing/equipment repair.

Mini Fishing Kit - No, I don't see this actually catching any fish, but I had the room so I threw it in for now. It's a small vial containing some split shot, swivels, and a wide variety of hooks. The outside of the vial has been completely wrapped with fishing line, although I honestly don't know how much.
Considerations: Is there a more practical and/or reliable source of catching food for the size?
Unless there are a LOT of streams or lakes around, lose. Your goal is to escape/get found. No time for fishing. Concentrate on signaling, water, and staying warm.

Vial of Pills – Included is 6 500mg Tylenol and 7 500mg Aspirin.
Considerations: Are there any other pills I should consider adding?
Lose both. Go with Ibuprofen if you can take it. If there is any possibility of tooth problems, add a small vial of oil of cloves.

Pocket Pry Bar – I had room, so I threw it in.
Considerations: Not sure this is practical in the wilderness, so I’ll ditch it if the room is needed.
Lose it.

Magnesium and Ferrocium Rods - These are my last chance fire starters should everything else fail.
Considerations: Are three firestarters necessary?
Yes, they are. But one should be in the bottle carrier, and you should have three more on you. Get the smallest Allweatherfirestarters.com combination magnesium rod/ferro rod/striker.

5-Minute Orion Signal Flare – Assured fire and a bright signaling device at night. Considerations: It’s a bit bulky and truthfully was included as a space-filler. I like the added signaling and fire, but recognize it may not be necessary.
Considerations: What else should I try and fill the space with?
Keep. Excellent use of space. Very well could be what saves your life.

Streamlight Stylus Pro - I carry either this or a 4Sevens Preon 2 (when I haven't lost it) as my EDC. I have had great experiences with this flashlight (including functioning for 15+ minutes at night in the ocean and successfully finding a dropped watch). It's loaded with 2xAAA Eneloops.
Considerations: Is there a better light out there? Should I go for an adjustable light to increase runtime?
Substitute a Maglite Solitaire LED 1x AAA with lithium battery.

CRKT M16-14ZLEK - This will serve as my main blade. While I am not normally a fan of partially serrated blades (because I hate sharpening them), I see a place for them in survival situations. I also don't see a situation where sharpening will be necessary should I have to break into this kit. This version of the M16 also features a strap/cord cutter as well as a tungsten carbide glass breaker.
Considerations: Is there a need for a blade larger than 4 inches? Would a fixed blade be a better choice? I am currently considering the Kabar Eskabar (the Becker/Izula hybrid).
Substitute the Victorinox Rucksack SAK which has a wood cutting blade and locking main blade, plus toothpick and tweezers.

AA Button Compass – A backup to whatever navigation device I have in my main pack.
Considerations: Should I opt for a larger (and presumably more accurate) compass?
If it is 20mm or larger, keep. Else get a 20mm or larger.

Mini Super Glue – For quick repairs and possibly as a liquid bandage (although last time I received a good argument against it).
Considerations: Should I ditch it for something better?
Lose. Use wound closure strips or duct tape.

Photon Freedom Button Light – Based on feedback last time, a hands-free light made sense. This is a small button light, with adjustable brightness, as well as several other modes. It comes with a hat/shirt/pocket clip.
Considerations: Are two lights too many? Are there others I should consider?
Keep. Redundancy here is good, as you may need to use either or both flashlights for signaling, not just seeing.

Fox 40 Whistle – Probably the most reliable and easy to use (and reuse) signaling device.
Considerations: Is there a louder whistle I should consider?
Good enough. Add a lanyard or attach to the Solitaire lanyard.

Potable Aqua Water Purification Tablets - I included the entire sealed vial of 50 tablets.
Considerations: Should I include a second purification method in case the pills are bad (besides boiling)? Is there a better method such as filtration that can feasibly work with the bottle kit concept? I may switch these out for Some blisterpack tablets, as 25L of purification doesn't seem necessary.
Switch to chlorine dioxide purification tablets in the foil packs.

Uncle Bill’s Tweezers – Another item thrown in mainly because it filled a space and could feasibly be useful.
Considerations: Should I keep it or trash it?
Lose it.

Gerber EAB - The backup knife, or alternatively, the blade that will remain razor sharp should that be necessary. It’s a very compact yet durable utility knife. I use one as my EDC, mainly because it's cheap (because I have a habit of losing blades) and blades are easily replaced when dulled (since I hate sharpening blades).
Considerations: Is there a need for a redundant knife given the main blade and multitool blade? Is there a better backup blade I should consider?
Substitute a smaller SAK as second knife.

Mini Signal Mirror – Another signaling device. I am a little skeptical due to its small size, but no other mirrors would fit into the bottle mouth.
Considerations: How feasible is it that help will be signalled by a mirror? Am I better off ditching it in favor of something else?
Keep. Signaling is very important. So is checking some places you can't see without a mirror.

6’ x 1” Gorilla Tape – Wrapped around an old card, I figured 6’ would be enough for most uses I’d have.
Considerations: Should I go for more?
Definitely more.

50' Kevlar Cord - Primarily, this would aid in shelter building as a ridge line if necessary. I doubt that would require more than 15'.
Considerations: What else would cord be necessary for in a short-term survival situation? Should I include more? Would I be better off with a thicker cord?
Definitely more and/or some light bank line. Consider wrapping lots around the bottle. You can never have too much cordage.

14g Esbit Cubes (x3) - Not only do these make a great fuel for firestarting, but each cube will burn for 10+ minutes on its own, which is plenty of time to stoak a fire or even boil water directly. The ferrocium rod is enough to light it easily.
Considerations: Is there a better fuel out there? Is 3 cubes too much or too little?
Good choice.

25' .45mm Twisted Wire (12lb breaking strength) – An alternative to the Kevlar cordage and could possibly be used for snares. I have quite a bit of space up under the shoulder of the bottle, so I tried this out.
Considerations: Should I add more or less? Is there a better snare-type wire I should consider?
Lose. Same reason as the fishing kit. If you want snares, get a Thompson 2-unit set.

Zip Ties – I have 5 small, 5 medium, and 1 large. Useful for securing gear and in case I don’t want to cut my cordage. Makes a quick and secure loop.
Considerations: Would more cordage be preferable over this? Once again, I had space in the bottle shoulder. Is there something else that could fit here?
Keep. Very useful. Get the releasable/reusable type, with nail hole.

Other Items – I currently have the bottle inside one of a Condor H2O pouch. The pouch also holds a blaze orange bandana (wrapped around the bottle). This gives me the entire front pocket to use. My current thought is to fill it with high-calorie food bars. I've been looking at the Snickers Marathon bars for a good balance of calories, nutrition, and size.
As stated, wrap the bottle with as much cord as possible including the bandana. If it isn't a survival bandana with survival tips, get one.

I like the Snickers Marathon bars. But the chocolate coating will melt in the heat. Substitute Millennium Ration bars, a couple of different flavors. Have at least one fire starter in the pocket, too.

Final Thoughts
As always, I appreciate any feedback, as this continues to be a work in progress.
Add several Tinder-Quick fire starting tinder tabs. Add a couple or more beef bouillon cubes in the bottle or pouch. Add several envelopes of Horlick's Malted Milk tablets to the bottle or pouch. Add a shoulder strap to the carrier if you don't already have one. Or braid one out of 550 Paracord (even better.)Thanks. :thumb:
Just my opinion.
 

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I did one of these a while back. It's fun to try to cram as much survival junk in a bottle as possible. I've since added a little more to mine. One thing you can do is wrap paracord around the outside of the bottle. Some people even make a carrying case with a sling out of paracord.
 

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off the griddle
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I'm personally not a fan of "all in one" kits. Mainly because if you lose that bottle (stuff happens!) then you've lost your entire kit.
I agree, a layered approach is best.

Start with things that you keep on you at all times (or at least handy so you can grab them when you dress), for example wallet, keys (I have a P-38 and a small led light on my key ring), folding knife, small bic, bandanna, maybe a Friendly Greek paracord bracelet with the firestarter and small blade.

My primary go/EDC bag is a FILBE hydration pack that includes some redundancy for the things I have on me (like another knife, lighter/firestarter, bandanna) plus Wet Fire tinder, paracord "grenade" survival kit, water purification tabs, life straw, emergency bivvy and blanket, soldier fuel bars, poncho, compass, IFAK, etc.

I have even more redundancy for fire and water filtering in my secondary EDC bag, which is one of those Maxpedition man purses that also contains my pistol, spare mags and Prodigy knife, as well as spare socks, more soldier fuel bars, 1 liter bottle and steel cup, firebox nano cook stove, wool cap, gloves, etc. If I have the time and the situation dictates, the pistol, mags and knife can hang on my belt.

If I am taking my rifle I have a chest rig that again has some redundancy for water, fire, food.

Then of course the BOB has everything I might need for 3 days to a week, adding even more redundancy for the basics.

Modularity, flexibility and redundancy is what I strive for.
 

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I tried to boil water in my SS water bottle, and I found I really needed a way to pick up and moved the hot bottle, (I dumped it over trying to move it with forked sticks).
I made a wire bail to pick up the bottle with, by wrapping thin steel mechanics wire tightly around the thread end.
I leave it on the bottle, but if it bothers you, maybe steel wire should be included in the kit.
TL
 

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I tried to boil water in my SS water bottle, and I found I really needed a way to pick up and moved the hot bottle, (I dumped it over trying to move it with forked sticks).
I made a wire bail to pick up the bottle with, by wrapping thin steel mechanics wire tightly around the thread end.
I leave it on the bottle, but if it bothers you, maybe steel wire should be included in the kit.
TL
That issue gets too much attention, imo. They have the bailing wire, fish mouth spreaders, etc. etc. , but to me that's not necessary. I have a pair of leather and suede gloves that are my all purpose utility gloves. Everyone should have some type of gloves like this if they are prepared for outdoor living. Those work fine for me when handling my aluminum mess kit in the fire. But with a steel bottle and steam you might want to use a cloth or bandana in addition to the gloves.
 

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I thought of this when I was doing the earlier post but forgot by the time I got to the end.

I would also wrap a large sheet of HD aluminum foil, folded up, around the bottle, along with the survival bandana and 550 cord. Even better would be Reynolds HD Grill Foil. Much heavier duty.

And since you are using a carrier (I prefer the Maxpedition 4x10 version myself) you might consider adding three additional items to the carrier.

A nesting folding handle OLicamp cup (has volume markings to measure water), A nesting grill top bottle stove, and a spring bottle hanger from Canteenshop.com http://www.canteenshop.com/cooking.html

And, if you add those items, you might add a spoon to the outside pouch of the carrier.

Just my additional opinion.
 

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There have been several water bottle pre-made kits done already.
Most of them were like any pre-made kit, you could build better, made for your needs.
And use higher end gear to boot.

The "equipped to survive" site has a kit section that shows most of pre-made ones sold.
They show all the good/bad things done.

Plus they sell their version of best kit too.

Just like the altoids kit, play with it till you're satisfied and done with it.
Guess you could write a book when you're finished.
Several kit books already out there.
 

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I tried to boil water in my SS water bottle, and I found I really needed a way to pick up and moved the hot bottle, (I dumped it over trying to move it with forked sticks).
I made a wire bail to pick up the bottle with, by wrapping thin steel mechanics wire tightly around the thread end.
I leave it on the bottle, but if it bothers you, maybe steel wire should be included in the kit.
TL
Check the bottle hanger from www.canteenshop.com

Just my opinion.
 

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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #13
I'm personally not a fan of "all in one" kits. Mainly because if you lose that bottle (stuff happens!) then you've lost your entire kit.
The goal is to have this be something I can throw into a pack or use it as a lumbar pack as a quick backup to my main gear. I would never use this as a "main" kit. It's role is ideally for if I lose my main kit (stuff happens), then I have a backup.

I've had the idea for something similar. I like it. I plan on using a regular size (20oz-ish) stainless water bottle. If I was you I would ditch the matches. And I would wrap the outside of the bottle in paracord. I'd probably narrow it down to 1 knife also. Overall pretty cool idea. Thanks for sharing.
Yeah, I considered the 20oz bottle, but there's just not enough room to fit an adequate shelter. As the original goal was to fit as much as I could INTO the bottle, I'd rather use a larger bottle than, say, wrap the shelter around the outside. I have a similar mindset regarding wrapping the bottle in cordage. I'd prefer it to be on the inside when possible.

Any reason for ditching the matches and knife? Fire and a cutting tool seem important enough to have backups (and I'd hate to rely on the flimsy blade of the Leatherman).

The funny thing is if i was lost in the bush, the one thing i'd want in that bottle is the one thing you don't have.... water.
Haha, very true, but a "survival kit" of just water doesn't make much sense to me, especially when water is in abundance where I live. I also find it more likely that I'd have issues with exposure before I had issues with dehydration.

I did one of these a while back. It's fun to try to cram as much survival junk in a bottle as possible. I've since added a little more to mine. One thing you can do is wrap paracord around the outside of the bottle. Some people even make a carrying case with a sling out of paracord.
I'm trying to avoid just throwing in "junk" and actually make sure every part of the kit has a purpose. I find the limited space helps a lot with that. Nice kit though. That's a sweet bottle. May have to look into that myself. The paracord sling is also something I have been considering. If I do use a sling, it will be of paracord.

I agree, a layered approach is best.

Start with things that you keep on you at all times (or at least handy so you can grab them when you dress), for example wallet, keys (I have a P-38 and a small led light on my key ring), folding knife, small bic, bandanna, maybe a Friendly Greek paracord bracelet with the firestarter and small blade.

My primary go/EDC bag is a FILBE hydration pack that includes some redundancy for the things I have on me (like another knife, lighter/firestarter, bandanna) plus Wet Fire tinder, paracord "grenade" survival kit, water purification tabs, life straw, emergency bivvy and blanket, soldier fuel bars, poncho, compass, IFAK, etc.

I have even more redundancy for fire and water filtering in my secondary EDC bag, which is one of those Maxpedition man purses that also contains my pistol, spare mags and Prodigy knife, as well as spare socks, more soldier fuel bars, 1 liter bottle and steel cup, firebox nano cook stove, wool cap, gloves, etc. If I have the time and the situation dictates, the pistol, mags and knife can hang on my belt.

If I am taking my rifle I have a chest rig that again has some redundancy for water, fire, food.

Then of course the BOB has everything I might need for 3 days to a week, adding even more redundancy for the basics.

Modularity, flexibility and redundancy is what I strive for.
I consider this kit to be one of my base layers. As I mentioned above, I'm aiming to not need this kit except for emergencies. Any task I do will have ideally its own set of gear, with this kit acting as redundancy. Day hikes will have water, a filter, map/compass, first aid kit, etc. A 72-hour bag will have a more robust shelter, cooking equipment, etc. I completely agree with the modular concept; this is just the first module I have reasonably complete. :)

I tried to boil water in my SS water bottle, and I found I really needed a way to pick up and moved the hot bottle, (I dumped it over trying to move it with forked sticks).
I made a wire bail to pick up the bottle with, by wrapping thin steel mechanics wire tightly around the thread end.
I leave it on the bottle, but if it bothers you, maybe steel wire should be included in the kit.
TL
I could construct a bail pretty easily with the cordage I have in the kit (although the Guyot Designs bottle had much better threads for gripping). A simple toggle on a string also works, so I'm really not too concerned about moving a hot bottle. Worst case, you screw the cap back on and move it like that.

Thanks for the feedback everyone. :thumb:
 

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Winter is coming.
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I can see you've put alot of time into this project and it has a certain aesthetic appeal, but it seems 'form' has taken precedence over 'function'.

Many of the items are just 'filler' or double or triple back ups. All this adds unnecessary weight to a survival kit which ideally will be carried at all times in the wilderness along with water and a knife.

Really you need to do some real world testing instead of just thought experiments. Bob Cooper (a legend in Aussie bush survival) developed his own kit and did an unsupported 5 night hike through the Northern Territory wilderness with just the kit to prove its effectiveness. I'm not saying you need to go to those extremes, but a couple of overnight hikes would tell you what you use and whats unnecessary.

For instance: Get dropped off by a mate somewhere with just the kit and walk back with one overnight stop. Immediately you'll see that you have no water for the walk. You need to test it dude!
 

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Very cool post Xaith. I know it has been touched by other members, but I would find a different knife than the Gerber. I have one and really like the design, but it isn't good for much more than opening boxes. I found that I constantly broke blades off doing the simplest of task. Usually they snap right where the screw holds them.

Defiantly add a bandanna and some tin foil. I believe you can sterilize water with a form of iodine, not sure if it's the little packs you have there but I would look into it more. Nothing wrong with multi purpose items...
 

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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #16
I didn't participate in the fist post (I think.) But I like this idea, so my thoughts are in red.

[snip]

Just my opinion.
Ditty Bag - That's a great idea. I'll see if the mesh can hold the weight. My one concern would be its flimsiness.

2g Celox - I wanted something for larger wounds (things that gauze may not be enough for. The sponges are too bulky to work in a kit here, so I thought this would be nice. 2g is pretty small though, so I'm not sure it's worth it.

Leatherman Squirt PS4 - Any reason for ditching it? I get the full spectrum, from ditching it to including a larger one.

Misc. Vial - I have one or two small needles which are great for digging out splinters. There are a lot of small nails, so i think I'm set. I'll see about adding another large safety pin.

Vial of Pills - I take Tylenol because one of my hiking buddies is allergic to Ibuprofen. I can probably adjust the numbers though.

5-Minute Orion Signal Flare - Interesting. All other feedback I have gotten was for ditching it, since it's a waste of space.

Streamlight Stylus Pro - The 1:45 runtime on the Solitaire concerns me a lot. I would blow through that easily in a night or two. Maybe one of the other adjustable single-AAA lights?

CRKT M16-14ZLEK - Any reason for that Victorinox? Most other advice I have gotten was to get specifically a fixed blade.

50' Kevlar Cord - I guess this begs the question of how much cordage is enough? Similarly, what are the expected uses of cordage in a survival situation besides shelter-building and possibly a few lashes (to a pack or otherwise)? I have a really hard time justifying more than 50' unless I see myself actually needing it.

Zip Ties - I was recently shown that almost all zip ties are reusable assuming you know how to use a shim. Pretty useful.

I thought of this when I was doing the earlier post but forgot by the time I got to the end.

I would also wrap a large sheet of HD aluminum foil, folded up, around the bottle, along with the survival bandana and 550 cord. Even better would be Reynolds HD Grill Foil. Much heavier duty.

And since you are using a carrier (I prefer the Maxpedition 4x10 version myself) you might consider adding three additional items to the carrier.

A nesting folding handle OLicamp cup (has volume markings to measure water), A nesting grill top bottle stove, and a spring bottle hanger from Canteenshop.com http://www.canteenshop.com/cooking.html

And, if you add those items, you might add a spoon to the outside pouch of the carrier.

Just my additional opinion.
The foil, nesting pot, and stove are all items I have considered, but given that I don't actually have any food that needs cooking, I have a hard time justifying them. At most, I would use a nesting cup, but the rest seems unnecessary for the capabilities of this kit.

The bottle carriers are essentially the same from what I have seen, minus a logo or two.

I would like to find a way to add in paracord if I can, even if it's just a few yards. I'll see what I can do.

Thanks for the great feedback. Your posts are always quite insightful. :thumb:
 

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Good list here are my thoughts


Contents Details
Klean Kanteen 40oz Stainless Steel Water Bottle - This is the container of the kit that everything ideally fits into. The general theory for wide-mouth metal bottles holds true here; it can serve as a cooking device or water boiler. This is an upgrade from a Guyot Designs Stainless Steel Nalgene, which weighed more while holding less and supposedly has issues with rusting along the seams.
Considerations: I’m not sure there are any here, given that the concept is built around a water bottle. The only two legitimate options I have been given were this bottle and the Guyot one. One slight modification I might do is change to the flat-top lid rather than the round one I currently have. I don’t gain any space on the inside, but it takes up slightly less space on the outside.

42-gallon Contractor Bag - I have opted for the contractor bag for my rudimentary shelter/poncho. This by far takes up the most room in the kit. Should a shelter be necessary, I see this being used more as a "quick and dirty" shelter, or alternatively as a method to help waterproof a debris shelter if I have a bit more time.
Considerations: Based on feedback I got just after taking these photos, I have switched the contractor bag out for an AMK SOL Emergency Bivy and an AMK SOL Survival Blanket.

Ditty Bag – Based on overwhelming feedback, I have finally found and included a ditty bag for carrying all of the gear once it is taken out of the bottle.
Considerations: I'll probably find a better ditty bag when I have the chance. Perhaps something from Sea To Summit.

Medi-Lyte Electrolyte Replentisher (x2) – These tablets are meant to combat fatigue, muscle cramping, and heat stress due to extended exertion and sweating. It also helps with hangovers.
Considerations: How important would this be in a sudden survival situation? Is there a better brand? Would Gatorade powder be just as good?

Single-use Triple Antibiotic Ointment (x2) – Pretty self-explanatory. For small wounds, this provides some basic protection.
Considerations: Should I add more? more is better

Fabric Band-Aids (x5) – Also for small cuts, blisters, and punctures. For their size, they really are a staple of any first-aid kit.
Considerations: is 5 too many or too little? Is there a better brand? Should I consider other shapes? Several sizes , and gauze and tape.

4x Fresnel Lens – Call it a fire-starter if you want. Call it an aid for dealing with wounds or really anything that requires fine motor skills. It’s flat and weighs next to nothing.
Considerations: I am currently tempted to ditch this should I actually need the room. Nice as the fresnel lens are they do not work as well a s a real glass lens , when dealing with small splinters that become so irritating. More effective too for fire starting.

Single-use Providone-Iodine (x2) – Used in wound preparation as an anti-septic.
Considerations: Is this unnecessary given the triple antibiotic? I use colloidal silver internally and externally. and make it at home.

½” x 4” Steri-Strips (x12) – Used for larger cut management and closure. It comes in two packs of 6 ½” x 4” strips.
Considerations: Should I add more/fewer? Should I substitute something better or different for these?

2 3/8” x 2 3/4" Tegaderm – Protection and waterproofing for a larger wound. Very cool stuff, although pricey.
Considerations: Should I add more or replace this with something else? Large ones can always be cut down with scissors.

3” x 5” Orange Index Card (x5) – They can be used for note-taking, trail blazing, or as another type of visual signal.
Considerations: Should I use fewer cards? Is there something better? (Blaze-orange waterproof paper maybe?)

Adhesive Moleskin Pad – For blisters.
Considerations: Is this enough? Is there something better? SOP have spare

2” x 2” Gauze Pad (x4) – For larger injuries and bleeders.
Considerations: Should I try for a gauze roll?Roll.

1L Water Bag – The backup container for storing water (or other items if necessary). It’s slightly more than 1L, but includes a 1L line for use with purification tablets.
Considerations: Is there something better for a backup water container?good

Match Striker Pads (x2) – They come with UCO Stormproof Matchboxes, so I threw them in.
Considerations: If anyone can actually convince me the space is better suited elsewhere, I’ll consider it.

2g Celox – For serious wounds. Obviously not a permanent solution, but for bigger gashes, this should stop it fast.
Considerations: Should I add more? Super glue IMO

Leatherman Squirt PS4 – A mini multitool. Pliers, a blade, scissors, bottle opener, etc. I had a Leatherman Rebar in before this and was convinced to downsize.
Considerations: should I ditch it altogether? Is there a better tool out there?

UCO Stormproof Matches (x25) – From what I can tell, these are the gold standard of waterproof matches.
Considerations: Are there better alternatives?

BIC Lighter – It’s a BIC Lighter. It makes fire.
Considerations: Is there a better lighter out there? Do I need both this and the matches, or can I ditch one?

Misc. Vial - This vial contains a bunch of nails, needles, and safety pins. I have seen a few survival-type kits that make arguments for including a few nails, needles, and safety pins for various repairs and makeshift supplies.
Considerations: Are there any other small items such as these that I should consider? Should I just completely scrap this to make room for other supplies?
Duplex nails are best ,designed to be pulled and reused =double head.
Needles and thread are very important also keep some monofiliment for surgical use.
Mini Fishing Kit - No, I don't see this actually catching any fish, but I had the room so I threw it in for now. It's a small vial containing some split shot, swivels, and a wide variety of hooks. The outside of the vial has been completely wrapped with fishing line, although I honestly don't know how much. Spear fishing might be more effective depending on the body of water your near. fishing line and gear can be helpful tie of to tree branches, and go on trapping .
Considerations: Is there a more practical and/or reliable source of catching food for the size? Snares and sling shot

Vial of Pills – Included is 6 500mg Tylenol and 7 500mg Aspirin.
Considerations: Are there any other pills I should consider adding?
Benidril , cider vinegar and honey.

Pocket Pry Bar – I had room, so I threw it in.
Considerations: Not sure this is practical in the wilderness, so I’ll ditch it if the room is needed. Pry bar is a forced entry tool that could get you in trouble.

Magnesium and Ferrocium Rods - These are my last chance fire starters should everything else fail.
Considerations: Are three firestarters necessary?
Personally cotton and Vaseline are all I have really needed .

5-Minute Orion Signal Flare – Assured fire and a bright signaling device at night. Considerations: It’s a bit bulky and truthfully was included as a space-filler. I like the added signaling and fire, but recognize it may not be necessary.
Considerations: What else should I try and fill the space with
?Signal fires usually start forest fires , do not start fires on top of mountains, the wind will take it out of control.
Except for good snow fall I would never use s signal flare.

Streamlight Stylus Pro - I carry either this or a 4Sevens Preon 2 (when I haven't lost it) as my EDC. I have had great experiences with this flashlight (including functioning for 15+ minutes at night in the ocean and successfully finding a dropped watch). It's loaded with 2xAAA Eneloops.
Considerations: Is there a better light out there? Should I go for an adjustable light to increase runtime? I keep lots of flash lights/alternative lighting.

CRKT M16-14ZLEK - This will serve as my main blade. While I am not normally a fan of partially serrated blades (because I hate sharpening them), I see a place for them in survival situations. I also don't see a situation where sharpening will be necessary should I have to break into this kit. This version of the M16 also features a strap/cord cutter as well as a tungsten carbide glass breaker.
Considerations: Is there a need for a blade larger than 4 inches? Would a fixed blade be a better choice? I am currently considering the Kabar Eskabar (the Becker/Izula hybrid).Largely depends on your skill .I prefer larger fixed blade knives any time i'm in the woods, but a pock folder is good too.

AA Button Compass – A backup to whatever navigation device I have in my main pack.
Considerations: Should I opt for a larger (and presumably more accurate) compass? Ideally one should have a military grade compass and maps of the area and learn how to navigate .

Mini Super Glue – For quick repairs and possibly as a liquid bandage (although last time I received a good argument against it).
Considerations: Should I ditch it for something better? If you've washed out a wound and applied an antibiotic super glue is my choice.

Photon Freedom Button Light – Based on feedback last time, a hands-free light made sense. This is a small button light, with adjustable brightness, as well as several other modes. It comes with a hat/shirt/pocket clip.
Considerations: Are two lights too many? Are there others I should consider?

Fox 40 Whistle – Probably the most reliable and easy to use (and reuse) signaling device.
Considerations: Is there a louder whistle I should consider?

Potable Aqua Water Purification Tablets - I included the entire sealed vial of 50 tablets.
Considerations: Should I include a second purification method in case the pills are bad (besides boiling)? Is there a better method such as filtration that can feasibly work with the bottle kit concept? I may switch these out for Some blisterpack tablets, as 25L of purification doesn't seem necessary.Sawyer filter.

Uncle Bill’s Tweezers – Another item thrown in mainly because it filled a space and could feasibly be useful.
Considerations: Should I keep it or trash it? I keep precision needle tweezers in my wallet wall the time .

Gerber EAB - The backup knife, or alternatively, the blade that will remain razor sharp should that be necessary. It’s a very compact yet durable utility knife. I use one as my EDC, mainly because it's cheap (because I have a habit of losing blades) and blades are easily replaced when dulled (since I hate sharpening blades).
Considerations: Is there a need for a redundant knife given the main blade and multitool blade? Is there a better backup blade I should consider?

Mini Signal Mirror – Another signaling device. I am a little skeptical due to its small size, but no other mirrors would fit into the bottle mouth.
Considerations: How feasible is it that help will be signalled by a mirror? Am I better off ditching it in favor of something else? Having any mirror is important especially if you get something in your eye or got you from behind.

6’ x 1” Gorilla Tape – Wrapped around an old card, I figured 6’ would be enough for most uses I’d have.
Considerations: Should I go for more?

50' Kevlar Cord - Primarily, this would aid in shelter building as a ridge line if necessary. I doubt that would require more than 15'.
Considerations: What else would cord be necessary for in a short-term survival situation? Should I include more? Would I be better off with a thicker cord?

14g Esbit Cubes (x3) - Not only do these make a great fuel for firestarting, but each cube will burn for 10+ minutes on its own, which is plenty of time to stoak a fire or even boil water directly. The ferrocium rod is enough to light it easily.
Considerations: Is there a better fuel out there? Is 3 cubes too much or too little?

25' .45mm Twisted Wire (12lb breaking strength) – An alternative to the Kevlar cordage and could possibly be used for snares. I have quite a bit of space up under the shoulder of the bottle, so I tried this out.
Considerations: Should I add more or less? Is there a better snare-type wire I should consider?

Zip Ties – I have 5 small, 5 medium, and 1 large. Useful for securing gear and in case I don’t want to cut my cordage. Makes a quick and secure loop.
Considerations: Would more cordage be preferable over this? Once again, I had space in the bottle shoulder. Is there something else that could fit here?

Other Items – I currently have the bottle inside one of a Condor H2O pouch. The pouch also holds a blaze orange bandana (wrapped around the bottle). This gives me the entire front pocket to use. My current thought is to fill it with high-calorie food bars. I've been looking at the Snickers Marathon bars for a good balance of calories, nutrition, and size.

Final Thoughts
As always, I appreciate any feedback, as this continues to be a work in progress. Thanks. :thumb:[/QUOTE]

Some folk hav the luxury of knowing where they will be working all the time so planning one's way home is some what easier.
Your distance from home and so many factors beside that make it difficult to speculate rationally.
Roads to be crossed and bridges compromised making crossing a river that much more of a challenge.
Google earth and look over the terrain and properties you must circumvent .
Having a heads up on getting from point A to point B is invaluable .
On a brisk walk no load , I can do 5 MPH average .
Loaded I might whittle down to 3.5-4 MPH unless injured.
A man needs to know his limitations.
 

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Resurgam.
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Discussion Starter #18
I can see you've put alot of time into this project and it has a certain aesthetic appeal, but it seems 'form' has taken precedence over 'function'.

Many of the items are just 'filler' or double or triple back ups. All this adds unnecessary weight to a survival kit which ideally will be carried at all times in the wilderness along with water and a knife.

Really you need to do some real world testing instead of just thought experiments. Bob Cooper (a legend in Aussie bush survival) developed his own kit and did an unsupported 5 night hike through the Northern Territory wilderness with just the kit to prove its effectiveness. I'm not saying you need to go to those extremes, but a couple of overnight hikes would tell you what you use and whats unnecessary.

For instance: Get dropped off by a mate somewhere with just the kit and walk back with one overnight stop. Immediately you'll see that you have no water for the walk. You need to test it dude!
So what are you suggesting? I take a liter of water as a survival kit? Almost none of the compact kits I have seen that are built around survival bother to consider water, because it is far too impractical to include it. Hell, you said it yourself; "a survival kit which ideally will be carried at all times in the wilderness along with water.

This kit is not meant to be the sole gear I take out with me. It is a backup. I hike with either my Camelbak or two Nalgenes for water. I live on the East coast, where I am hard pressed to walk for an hour in any direction without passing by several streams. My kit has the ability to hold 2+ liters of water easily. Once again I reiterate, this is meant as a backup.

Regarding the "filler", what exactly do you consider to be filler? Yes, I have three methods of starting a fire. I consider that to be one of the most important items to take with me. The lighter gives me sure fire, but could leak. The matches are great in the rain, but there is a limited quantity. The ferro rod is essentially unlimited as a last resort, although it requires the most skill to use. Each has their role, and fire is not something I will take my chances on. Likewise for a cutting tool and light. After that, I have hit the 10 C's of survival, which covers a lot of my kit. I then have some medical supplies, and then a very small amount of other accessories that are nice to have. If you think something is filler, please let me know what and why, and we can actually have a conversation about it.

I agree that testing gear is important. Usually, a piece of gear won't go into my kit unless I have tested it. Realistically, I wouldn't need a lot of the kit on an overnight hike, but that's because the kit is designed for emergencies. About the only thing I know I need to test is the shelter, but that's because I just changed it from the clearly inadequate contractor bag. But still, I'm not sure how I could improve on what I currently have for shelter. Once again, suggestions are welcome.
 

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Ditty Bag - That's a great idea. I'll see if the mesh can hold the weight. My one concern would be its flimsiness.

2g Celox - I wanted something for larger wounds (things that gauze may not be enough for. The sponges are too bulky to work in a kit here, so I thought this would be nice. 2g is pretty small though, so I'm not sure it's worth it.
That was my point as well. Is it worth it?

Leatherman Squirt PS4 - Any reason for ditching it? I get the full spectrum, from ditching it to including a larger one.
Mostly space. Substituting a smaller SAK with scissors and a small blade, in combination with the Rucksack, I think covers what you will need.

Misc. Vial - I have one or two small needles which are great for digging out splinters. There are a lot of small nails, so i think I'm set. I'll see about adding another large safety pin.
You are in good shape then.

Vial of Pills - I take Tylenol because one of my hiking buddies is allergic to Ibuprofen. I can probably adjust the numbers though.
Definitely the Tylenol then.

5-Minute Orion Signal Flare - Interesting. All other feedback I have gotten was for ditching it, since it's a waste of space.
Unless you specifically don't want to be found, then the flare could be what saves your life. Not just as a signal device though. If there is an icy rain coming down, and you need a fire right now, with marginal fire materials, this will start it when nothing else in the kit will.

Streamlight Stylus Pro - The 1:45 runtime on the Solitaire concerns me a lot. I would blow through that easily in a night or two. Maybe one of the other adjustable single-AAA lights?
Even though it would take up about the same place, I'd rather have the Solitaire LED with lithium battery, plus a second lithium battery in a geo-cache tube, because the actual runtime of the Solitaire, @ 37 lumens, is 2 1/2 hours to 70% of original brightness on a single battery and the Stylus Pro @ 48 lumens, is 6 1/4 hours to 10% of original brightness on the two batteries. Though using lithiums in it would help things.

CRKT M16-14ZLEK - Any reason for that Victorinox? Most other advice I have gotten was to get specifically a fixed blade.
I see little advantage to a single fixed blade of a size that will fit to a good lock blade, especially as the Rucksack has the wood saw, plus the other tools, that though you might not need them, they will be available, all for about the same size penalty. I think the wood saw trumps just about everything on the Squirt, especially if you have the smaller SAK, too.

50' Kevlar Cord - I guess this begs the question of how much cordage is enough? Similarly, what are the expected uses of cordage in a survival situation besides shelter-building and possibly a few lashes (to a pack or otherwise)? I have a really hard time justifying more than 50' unless I see myself actually needing it.
My mistake here. I saw the 15' and the 50' did not register. 50' is probably enough. Though consider how much you might use lashing together a lean-to, or tying off the space blanket as a shelter with guys, not just a ridge line.

Zip Ties - I was recently shown that almost all zip ties are reusable assuming you know how to use a shim. Pretty useful.
Yes, they can be. But the ones designed for it are much easier. And that nail hole makes it much easier to attach something to a tree with the zip tie, plus the cord can be tied off through the hole and things lashed together that would take a great deal more cord otherwise.

The foil, nesting pot, and stove are all items I have considered, but given that I don't actually have any food that needs cooking, I have a hard time justifying them. At most, I would use a nesting cup, but the rest seems unnecessary for the capabilities of this kit.
Though you might not have any food that needs cooking, heating up water, even if it is just warm water to drink, or for making broth from the bouillon cubes, having that warm liquid goes a long way to keeping the body warm in cold/wet situations. Plus, you might just find something wild to eat (meat or vegetation), and the ability to boil it, or if you are limited on water, wrap it in foil to cook it, you have the means. And to do that cooking, in the cup, or to boil the water in the bottle, using the support stand/stove allows one to have a much smaller fire, as it is contained and much more of the heat goes to the heating process than an open fire where the container is put into it. Which, this reminds me, for some reason, of something else I forgot. Any open space can be filled with individually wrapped hard candies for a sugar boost or as a comfort item.

The bottle carriers are essentially the same from what I have seen, minus a logo or two.
I had read that the Condor was just a bit more tight around the bottle than the Maxpedition, which isn't a factor if you don't wrap much around the bottle. It was more just my preference rather than a recommendation, anyway.

I would like to find a way to add in paracord if I can, even if it's just a few yards. I'll see what I can do.
I think the easiest and best way to get quite a bit of paracord will be to make a shoulder strap for the Condor.

Thanks for the great feedback. Your posts are always quite insightful. :thumb:
I really like threads like this. They make me think of options for myself. I may just use some of your ideas, along with mine, to put a similar kit together for myself.

Just my opinion.
 

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Personally, I'd go back to the bigger multi tool. The pliers on there can be used for handling a hot bottle (your cord can melt), but Jerry's suggestion looks like a nice little gadget.

I wouldn't ditch all of the fishing kit as the line can be used for sewing up a big cut if needed or sewing up your clothing or gear.

As for more cord, it's always good. I'd look at Stormdranes blog and what he's done with water bottles and cordage.
 
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