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first post on this new to this forum so i apologize if this has been covered....having a hard time finding what im looking for via searching or using the search tool Thanks in advance for helping a somewhat new prepper :):D:

4 questions....

1. is there a way to sort the topics by type of prep (water, food, weapons) ?

2. how long after a nuclear dirty/ bomb will local unprotected water be irradiated
ie. be unsafe to drink

3. Is there a way to remove radiation (irradiated particles?) from water via chemicals of filters?

4. how much water should I store ( i've heard 1 gallon a day per person 5 gallon a day) unsure Im asking how much water will i need to store to get me to the point where i can go out and find local water via river spring etc.

:confused:
 

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1. The search function isn't the best. You can try the various search terms and see what you get. What I do when I get on a new board is to search for what I can find and then mark everything read, and then start with the new posts since last visit. The various subjects come up time after time, so what you are looking for will be in a new or old post at some point.

2. Water does not become radioactive from fallout. (different story in power plants) If no fallout has fallen, the water will only need what purification it would need anyway.

3. Only the particals of fallout are radioactive. Don't know of any chemical that will remove them (at least not a practical one for home use). But simple filtration will remove them. CLEAN THE FILTER or throw it away IMMEDIATELY because it will be carrying the radioactive particals.

4. A gallon a day for drinking. More if you intend to wash dishes, bathe, or wash clothes. 14 gallons for the base 2-week shelter stay if there is moderate fallout. More is better. You won't have too much.

Just my opinion.
 

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Warlord of the wastes
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The one component of possible fallout I would be concerned about a filter not removing is radioactive iodine. I don't know if iodine is something a standard filter removes or not.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I think that you should plan on at least 2 gals a day, its cheap and easy to store. Just looked through the chernobyle sp? area from a thread on this site. http://www.kiddofspeed.com I would worry more about the airborne sources first. In a real blast the rads are down about 10,000 fold in 2 weeks but that doesn't mean its safe out.
 

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1. The search function isn't the best. You can try the various search terms and see what you get. What I do when I get on a new board is to search for what I can find and then mark everything read, and then start with the new posts since last visit. The various subjects come up time after time, so what you are looking for will be in a new or old post at some point.

2. Water does not become radioactive from fallout. (different story in power plants) If no fallout has fallen, the water will only need what purification it would need anyway.

3. Only the particals of fallout are radioactive. Don't know of any chemical that will remove them (at least not a practical one for home use). But simple filtration will remove them. CLEAN THE FILTER or throw it away IMMEDIATELY because it will be carrying the radioactive particals.

4. A gallon a day for drinking. More if you intend to wash dishes, bathe, or wash clothes. 14 gallons for the base 2-week shelter stay if there is moderate fallout. More is better. You won't have too much.

Just my opinion.
For me it would be torture to drink that much!

A gallon is 128 ounces. I find that about 48 ounces is the maximum I can handle in a day. Maybe if it was very hot I would sweat more and drink more.
 

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Gas! Gas! Gas!
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I'm not very knowledgeable on the mechanical filtration of radioactive particles in water, but I do know that once these particles are in the water, they will all react differently, depending on exactly what they are... water does funny things to different elements.

However, for some time after a nuclear/radioactive incident, spring water should be the safest water to drink... being filtered naturally through layers of soil and stone. Spring water from limestone bedrock won't be as good as spring water filtered through gravel and soil, because water runs quickly and more freely through limestone via the many cracks and joints in the easily soluble stone. I would think that any water from an underground source that is running through gravelly soil would be safest to drink once fallout has become an issue. The deeper the spring/well, the better.

Any home well that is deep and cased (sealed) should be fine. My well, for instance, is over 200 ft. down and is cased... I don't see any fallout bothering it any time soon.
 

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Any water soluble radioactive particles will be a problem.

Radioactive iodine can be dealt with by taking the iodine tablets. but some of the others many cause problems 20+years later.

Some forms of Cesium 137 and strontium-90 are water soluble.

Distillation would be the only sure way of removing these.

Reverse osmosis will get only 95% to 98% but even that is better then your body being exposed to 100%.

By the way a geiger counter is almost useless for testing water because water is a radiation shield
To test water you have to boil the water away completely and test the deposits left in the container
 

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1) I have no idea.

2) Until you remove the radioactive contaminants.

3) Filtration would work. Reverse Osmosis would be better. Distillation would be best of all.

4) That is an impossible question to answer. Depends on temperature, humidity, level of activity and how much creature comfort you want. 5 gallons is LOT of water if all you are doing is drinking/cooking but not much at all if you are washing food and doing laundry. Half gallon a day is enough to drink under comfortable conditions and little activity but not nearly enough for hot environments and/or heavy activity.
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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first post on this new to this forum so i apologize if this has been covered....having a hard time finding what im looking for via searching or using the search tool Thanks in advance for helping a somewhat new prepper :):D:

4 questions....

1. is there a way to sort the topics by type of prep (water, food, weapons) ?

2. how long after a nuclear dirty/ bomb will local unprotected water be irradiated
ie. be unsafe to drink

3. Is there a way to remove radiation (irradiated particles?) from water via chemicals of filters?

4. how much water should I store ( i've heard 1 gallon a day per person 5 gallon a day) unsure Im asking how much water will i need to store to get me to the point where i can go out and find local water via river spring etc.

:confused:
Here's a temporary solution if you have a little extra room and don't mind the ugly containers:

This is a 75 Gallon water container I keep in my room by my bed (some other emergency food stuff around it):



This is a 25 Gallon water container I have in my living room. Not pretty but who cares?


I already filter my tap water through these Berkey water filters:


You can buy the water containers from this site and have them shipped directly to your door: http://www.plastic-mart.com/category.aspx?cat=9

There's a vendor right on this site that will sell you a Berkey for a competitive price and his service it top notch: http://www.survivalistboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=73

I bought the smaller "Big Berkey" elsewhere but I bought the larger "Crown Berkey" from the "Berkey Guy" of LPC Survival.
 

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Reverse osmosis does remove radioactive particles but it also produces a lot of waste water. You also need to plug them in to an electrical source. The TRAP radiation filter was designed specifically to remove radioactive particles incorporating zeolite into the media and using ion exchange technology. It removes over 95% of radioactive particles. You can use the 10" candles in countertop or under counter filter housing. I'd offer the link to my website where you can get more info but I've been warned against doing that or I'll be banned. You can go to my blog above and go to my store or follow the link to my site from my name above.
 

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Pisticus Veritas
Very Prepared!!
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Reverse osmosis does remove radioactive particles but it also produces a lot of waste water. You also need to plug them in to an electrical source. The TRAP radiation filter was designed specifically to remove radioactive particles incorporating zeolite into the media and using ion exchange technology. It removes over 95% of radioactive particles. You can use the 10" candles in countertop or under counter filter housing. I'd offer the link to my website where you can get more info but I've been warned against doing that or I'll be banned. You can go to my blog above and go to my store or follow the link to my site from my name above.
Here's a pretty good article on that: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcm...e-radioactive-iodine-131-from-drinking-water/

I also just read that Berkey's do not remove radioactivity so I'm looking into some means by which I can remove it without having to use an electrical device.
 

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Getting There!
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Here's a pretty good article on that: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcm...e-radioactive-iodine-131-from-drinking-water/

I also just read that Berkey's do not remove radioactivity so I'm looking into some means by which I can remove it without having to use an electrical device.
It sounds like a gravity pre-filter through sand and pebbles is a good idea. Then distill.

I kind of looked around at distillers and they're 1) electric and 2) expensive.

It appears that making a wood fired still is the cheapest option.

The equipment and sand/gravel will be contaminated obviously. Changing the sand and gravel out and closing off the coils to the distiller will be necessary.

Doable though!

Lengths of PVC pipe can packed with sand and gravel and used as the pre-filter to remove as many contaminated particles as is possible before going to the destiller. Or maybe a series of pre-filters; take out of one and pour into another.

The better the starting water the better the working conditions.
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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It sounds like a gravity pre-filter through sand and pebbles is a good idea. Then distill.

I kind of looked around at distillers and they're 1) electric and 2) expensive.

It appears that making a wood fired still is the cheapest option.

The equipment and sand/gravel will be contaminated obviously. Changing the sand and gravel out and closing off the coils to the distiller will be necessary.

Doable though!

Lengths of PVC pipe can packed with sand and gravel and used as the pre-filter to remove as many contaminated particles as is possible before going to the destiller. Or maybe a series of pre-filters; take out of one and pour into another.

The better the starting water the better the working conditions.
I just did a little searching and found this company that claims to have new technology for removing radioactivity from water. I may try to get one of their units:

http://nuwaterconcepts.com/

I may have to take your plan into consideration as well. Sounds like it could work but I'm not sure I have the means to make it work.
 

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Here's a pretty good article on that: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcm...e-radioactive-iodine-131-from-drinking-water/

I also just read that Berkey's do not remove radioactivity so I'm looking into some means by which I can remove it without having to use an electrical device.
Check out the TRAP, Action. The Pureffect is basically a copy of the TRAP. I don't think it's been tested. I communicated with the manufacturer. The TRAP is cheaper and has been tested.
 

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Observer
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It's not the actual water itself that gets contaminated but rather the particles IN the water (dust, dirt etc.). Filter, filter, filter and filter some more then boil and collect evaporating water.

The amount of time that the particulates in the water takes to become safe depends on the half lives of the radioactive elements in there, it could range from a few days to a few decades, so, there is really no way to know (short of a full laboratory full of physicists, chemists and thousand dollar equipment).
 

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Getting There!
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I just did a little searching and found this company that claims to have new technology for removing radioactivity from water. I may try to get one of their units:

http://nuwaterconcepts.com/

I may have to take your plan into consideration as well. Sounds like it could work but I'm not sure I have the means to make it work.
The filters aren't as expensive as I thought they would be. It would probably be a good idea to run another filter before it to catch any debris that might clog the second filter. If the water is running it won't get any easier than this.

There are so many problems otherwise that getting out of Dodge seems to be the best thing to do.

I'm thinking of how many radioactive particles that you'll come into contact with trying to filter water. The top layers of sand and gravel will presumably be contaminated. Cleaning the filters will get you lots of contact. How are you going to get all of this contamination off, so as not to bring it into the home?

I'd say if the water is running fill all the containers that you can and leave. That might well be on foot or horseback, though. And where are you going to go?

I'm not a quitter, but if the quality of life gets that bad I might well reevaluate.

If you're close to a coast hop a boat and go somewhere else is about all that I can come up with.
 
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