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Free Mason
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I home canned some butter and cheese in 10-08. Today I throw out all 130 jars. The butter has gone rancid and the cheese had mold and turned brown. The instructions I followed called for 40 minuets boiling in a water bath canner. In a new canning book by the same author the time was increased to 60 minuets. Please check all home canned butter and cheese.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I've also seen a LOT of recommendations against canning both because of botulism worries. Botulism can live through the heat of water bath canning. That's why only acidic foods are water bath canned.

Botulism toxin can be destroyed by simmering the food for a few minutes before eating. But how many of us were going to simmer that cheese or butter?

In a link posted in a different thread, there was mention that heavy purees and pure fats require special canning processes that home canners are generally not equipped to do.
 

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Sorry about your loss, but thanks for posting the warning. To me, canning butter and cheese is the same as canning mashed pumpkin - it can be done, but the heating requirements are such that it really can't be done on a small scale in the home, pretty much just commercially.
 

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Free Mason
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I thought you could only water bath can acetic stuff and fruits???Everything else had to be pressure canned....
The lady (Jacky Clay) that gave the recipe said that butter and cheese are considered a high acid food because of the lactic acid. I accepted her explanation. Noe I am not so sure. Even fruit should be pressure canned unless it has a lot of sugar.
 

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That's terrible. It must be heartbreaking to have to toss them out. :( I'm very leary of canning anything like that. I just ordered some of the commercially canned butter for my stockpile; not sure how its going to be. I also have some dehydrated butter, but I've never tried it.
 

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Bleach blonde on fire :p
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I posted this on the other thread so I'll post it here too...................



Never can butter....you can do Ghee though....in the process the milk solids is taken out of the butter (the milk and water left in it is what makes it go rancid) and what you are left with is the pure oil of butter....its safe to store. There are many vids o youtube but they do not do it for long enough to get all the milk solids out....

Here is my Ghee .... it is clear the background wall color makes it kinda blurry lol



This video shows you the ONLY correct way to process ghee to be able to store it....he uses large amounts but you can do the same thing with smaller amounts. It takes a little while on the stove top but you want to make sure you get ALL the milk solids out (milk solids is what you see floating around in melted butter-its whitish when the butter is melted) so it want go rancid.


Right way






Wrong way....you see the yellowish white stuff in the bottom....thats what will make the canned butter go rancid.


 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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The lady (Jacky Clay) that gave the recipe said that butter and cheese are considered a high acid food because of the lactic acid. I accepted her explanation. Noe I am not so sure. Even fruit should be pressure canned unless it has a lot of sugar.
Neither butter, nor most cheese is high enough acid to resist botulism. This is why waxing commercial cheese doesn't work. It's not acidic enough to be safe and contains too much moisture. Artisinal cheeses that are created specifically to be waxed, have to be made properly to assure the right acidity level.

And I doubt butter could achieve that level regardless. That's why traditionally, it has always been impossible to store long term with home methods.
 

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Old Hounds Smell Good
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I'm suspicious of any home canned butter or cheese or milk products. It's just too dangerous.

Ghee is, I know, a different matter but I'm just not confident enough of my ability and don't want to risk our lives in a shtf situation from butter oil when things will be hard enough without food poisoning on top of it. Plus, botulism kills without the right kind of care in a short period of time.

Nah, I made the decision a while ago that I'll just go with powdered butter, powdered and dehydrated cheese and powdered milk instead. May not be as tasty, but at least it is safe.
 

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I canned some butter like it was done in the second video. It did pretty good for my situation. I kept it in the refrigerator and used in within a few weeks. The last jar had mold in it after about a month and a half so I dumped it. For short term storage in a refrigerator you can get by with small batches. Now way would I try to store anything longer than about 6 weeks, myself.

Haven't tried the Ghee yet.
 

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Every time I mention that canning butter and cheese is NOT safe, someone comes on and says they've done it for years and they aren't dead yet. I just say that I take my budget and time seriously and won't put money into something that is so questionable.
Ghee IS different, but considering all the choices available out there (Red Feather, powders, homemade with milk etc) I figure I'll live without doing so. I'm very glad to see this topic come up again! I'm so sorry to the OP who had to throw out all her hard work!
 

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Pleasantly demented woman
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I canned some butter like it was done in the second video. It did pretty good for my situation. I kept it in the refrigerator and used in within a few weeks. The last jar had mold in it after about a month and a half so I dumped it. For short term storage in a refrigerator you can get by with small batches. Now way would I try to store anything longer than about 6 weeks, myself.

Haven't tried the Ghee yet.
I'm curious - why bother if it will keep in the fridge a few weeks without processing? - I buy butter when it's on sale, keep 6 pounds or so in the downstairs fridge and freeze the rest and have never had any go bad. It usually stays in the downstairs fridge for as long as 3-4 months before it all gets eaten.
 

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Ok I know this is going to sound stupid, but why can this stuff? Seems like the risk isn't work the reward. Also I've never tried freezing butter or cheese, is there any reason why it wouldn't keep in the freezer instead of the fridge?
 

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Free Mason
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Ok I know this is going to sound stupid, but why can this stuff? Seems like the risk isn't work the reward. Also I've never tried freezing butter or cheese, is there any reason why it wouldn't keep in the freezer instead of the fridge?
We have both butter and cheese in the freezer. Keeps fine. Cream cheese gets a little gritty for lack of a better word. I saw the article on home canned butter and cheese and gave it a try. It was hard to through out the bad stuff but no one got sick and I learned from it.
 

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Free Mason
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Every time I mention that canning butter and cheese is NOT safe, someone comes on and says they've done it for years and they aren't dead yet. I just say that I take my budget and time seriously and won't put money into something that is so questionable.
Ghee IS different, but considering all the choices available out there (Red Feather, powders, homemade with milk etc) I figure I'll live without doing so. I'm very glad to see this topic come up again! I'm so sorry to the OP who had to throw out all her hard work!
You warned me.
 
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