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I plan on growing tomatoes, cucumbers, and bell peppers next year (as I often do), but I'd also like to purchase some seeds for any kind of vegetable/legume that has a high yield crop. KWIM? I want to make the most of the space I have, so I'd appreciate any suggestions. I'm in southeast Texas where it is hot and humid.

Thanks.
 

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Texas mom, most heirloom varieties where breed for good but not outstandingly high yield crops. They where developed for reliable growing in ordinary soil with natural rain fall and minimal fertilizer. Many of the OP seeds developed after the 1970s do better in Square Foot or Intensive gardening conditions than the older heirloom but not visa versa.

You might want to keep this in mind as you such the suppliers for your region.
 

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I would suggest zuchini, green beans, collard greens, swiss chard, potatoes grown with the tire stack meathod, and squash for high yeilds.
 

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assuming you're going to let some of your crops go to seed for next year?
Seeads are pretty cheap compared to weeding. what "crops" are we talking about on how much land?
I'd look into pole bean but beans are VERY cheap to buy. I'd be growing potatoes and chard/Kale, and peppers.
 

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Try the trip-L-crop Italian tree climbing tomato. It loves heat and can produce tons a great tasting, old fashioned, very large tomatoes. (Unfortuantely they don't keep well unless you can or dry them right away.)

In one hot summer here (Oregon) several years ago, they grew about 15 feet long and broke the wire support.

In your regions they could do great or horribly. I find that it's best to try many different varieties of each seed type. Each region is different and each growing season is different. The tomato that did great one year is often the worst yielder the next year. Temperature and rainfall tend to change from year to year, so it's best to hedge your best by trying multiple varities.

As for see sources, try Territorial seed company and pinetree garden seeds.
 

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i was just checking out seeds over on prison planet.

I looked thru the variety they had for display and didnt see much of anything I would grow and eat.

last year i got my seeds from heirloomseeds.com

For zone 5 the spinich and snap peas were easy to start. the spinich did exceptionally well, the peas were good too. (those would be early spring crops for you)
 

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Texas Mom,
Do you know where you are getting your seeds? It is probably here somewhere, but I haven't found a preferred seller. There are so many when I google "heirloom seeds"
Thanks
 

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bear in mind seeds lose a lot of germination after a year and subsequently.
Freezing helps.
 
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