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that's like, your opinion
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey all, I have an M1 Carbine and a SA M1A NM with walnut stocks... I am curious as to what finishes you all have used to treat your factory condition stocks.

i have refinished some older stocks with minwax wipe on poly (M1 Garand, FN49, mosin) after stripping, neutralizing and staining with minwax dark walnut... but they were older surplus grade rifles that I am not to worried about keeping too true to original as they are basically beaters.

i am guessing that natural boiled linseed or tung is the way to go... creates a burden of reapplying every year (whereas poly is pretty durable), but i would be interested in other people's procceses out there... any experience with birchwood casey tru-oil or other products????
 

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Knife Maker
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I always use Tru-Oil form Birchwood Casey. I usually apply 3-4 coats letting each coat fully dry and then sand with 220 paper between the first 2-3 coats then 000 steel wool between 3 & 4.
 

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that's like, your opinion
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I always use Tru-Oil form Birchwood Casey. I usually apply 3-4 coats letting each coat fully dry and then sand with 220 paper between the first 2-3 coats then 000 steel wool between 3 & 4.
awesome... i have all the materials for this one already... thanks for the reply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I use pure tung oil and raw linseed oil on my stocks. Why sand? Thats the quickest way to ruin a valuable stock.
i am guessing tung oil makes a more glossy finish.

my stocks are relatively flat to begin with coming from factory... would linseed be the way to go IYO??? is it bad to put tung on top of [what i assume] is a factory linseed finish?

i deinitely see the value of using quad0 steel wool for polishing to a nice sheen.
 

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that's like, your opinion
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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East young man, go East!
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I apply a couple coats of pure tung oil and then a few of raw linseed oil. My rifles are usgi and have had one of those two applied in the past. For commercial stocks I wouldnt have a problem using a product like tru-oil.
 

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Retired Army
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Tru-Oil is the bomb once you learn how to use it and you want a deep finish. Very thin coats and wet sanding in between. But, If you want the military look Boiled Linseed oil is the way to go.

Al
 

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Knife Maker
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I use pure tung oil and raw linseed oil on my stocks. Why sand? Thats the quickest way to ruin a valuable stock.
You did not read my post correctly...the finish is all you are sanding. And chances are pretty good it isn't the original stock so sanding isn't necessarily going to affect value anyhow. And if you don't at least clean up the stock you are just adding another layer of crud on top of 50 years worth.
 

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Knife Maker
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One other thing I did not say is...I use a mixture of minwax red oak and walnut to bring out the color of the walnut stocks. I use approx. a 50/50 ratio and it really makes the walnut pop. Then after that dries you go in to the coats of tru oil.
 

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that's like, your opinion
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You did not read my post correctly...the finish is all you are sanding. And chances are pretty good it isn't the original stock so sanding isn't necessarily going to affect value anyhow. And if you don't at least clean up the stock you are just adding another layer of crud on top of 50 years worth.
well, i have a process for old beater stocks... my OP was generally concerend with how to treat new factory stocks... which i think i will end up taking your advice of tru-oil with a quick polish (0000 steel wool) between coats. that seems like the best option since i wont be stripping the original finish off or subsequently sanding.
 

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RIP America 1776-2012
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If it's a commercial stock I'm refinishing I use multiple coats of hand rubbed/sanded tung oil, but for military firearms I use boiled linseed oil.


________________________

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"Obama, the skid-mark in the underwear of American history."
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I have refinished several rifles for customers to be used in the woods in damp environs. I have used a product called Danish Oil for years. It seals the wood very well. Look into it before you use it. It may work for your rifle.

HH54r
 
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that's like, your opinion
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have refinished several rifles for customers to be used in the woods in damp environs. I have used a product called Danish Oil for years. It seals the wood very well. Look into it before you use it. It may work for your rifle.

HH54r
I looked it up and it seems similar like a happy medium between minwax wipe on polymer and some of the other oil finishes that others are recommending.

might be an interesting fit, seems like there are so many options out there... i do want it protected from the elements, but i dont want that fake hard/shinny polymer look.
 

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I looked it up and it seems similar like a happy medium between minwax wipe on polymer and some of the other oil finishes that others are recommending.

might be an interesting fit, seems like there are so many options out there... i do want it protected from the elements, but i dont want that fake hard/shinny polymer look.
The Danish Oil will give you just that. It is also superior protection against water. You may need to touch it up fomr time to time. It has always worked well for me and my customers.

Take an old piece of wood outside that looks rough and try some on it. You will be impressed.

HH54r
 

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Have gun,will travel
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The Danish Oil will give you just that. It is also superior protection against water. You may need to touch it up fomr time to time. It has always worked well for me and my customers.

Take an old piece of wood outside that looks rough and try some on it. You will be impressed.

HH54r
X2! I used Danish oil on an Ironwood AK stock (maple) several years ago. It ended up being a beautiful finish for the stock set and water seemed to just run right off of it.
 
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