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I help enlighten folks
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's the story behind these?
Were they widely used?
 

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All bark, no bite
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http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/893611/posts

Lethal Weapon (Tomahawk)
ABCNEWS.com ^ | April 15 | David Tillett

Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 9:18:06 AM by Wonder Warthog

U.S. forces are using two types of tomahawks in Iraq: one, a high-tech cruise missile — the other, a bit more like the hatchet Mel Gibson used in the movie The Patriot.

Members of Air Force security groups, Army Rangers and special forces are some of the U.S. troops who have chosen to add tomahawks to their basic gear. So why would a member of today's armed services want a relic of the American frontier? According to one modern tomahawk manufacturer, it comes down to science, and the reasons soldiers carried them in the Revolutionary War are still valid today.

"The physics behind it make it an appropriate choice for any kind of battlefield conditions," said Ryan Johnson, owner of RMJ Forge.

"You take a knife, a knife has a certain amount of leverage that's given to you. The tomahawk can be used like a knife, but you also have that 18 inches of handle that gives you a huge amount of difference in power as far as the power of the cutting stroke. It's much more practical as a field tool because you can again use it like a knife or you can use it like an ax."

Tomahawks Also Used in Not-So-Distant History

The tomahawk was commonly carried by soldiers even prior to the Revolutionary War, but its use in modern times is not unprecedented.

According to Johnson, soldiers have used tomahawks in most of the major wars the United States has fought.

"In World War II, there were not only Native Americans using them, but also just your regular GI. A lot of these people were just carrying stuff from home, stuff that they used on the farm," Johnson said.

He added that an uncle who had served in the Korean War told him soldiers would take the standard hatchet that they were issued and grind the back down into a spike to make a "fighting hatchet."

World War II Marine veteran Peter LaGana was a pioneer in the modern military use of tomahawks. He created an updated tomahawk design and, from 1966 to 1970, sold about 4,000 of them to members of the armed forces serving in Vietnam before closing down his company.

From top right to lower left: American Tomahawk Co. founder Peter LaGana's original 1966 design for the "Vietnam Tomahawk," with drop-forged head and hickory handle; today's Vietnam Tactical Tomahawk with synthetic handle; LaGana Titanium Tactical Tomahawk. (Courtesy of American Tomahawk Co.)

While tomahawks have historically been made in a variety of patterns, LaGana chose a "spike hawk" design — which has the cutting blade common to hatchets, but a sturdy penetrating spike on the opposite side.

In November 2000, professional knife and tomahawk thrower Andy Prisco approached LaGana and got his approval to license his design and restart the defunct firm, the American Tomahawk Co. — which Prisco did in January 2001.

Prisco's revitalized firm sells several different tomahawk designs, mainly to sportsmen and collectors. But he said that among members of the military, the top-selling product is the Vietnam Tactical Tomahawk, which uses LaGana's original head design and an updated synthetic handle. LaGana died in 2002 after a battle with cancer.

Johnson, who had a childhood interest in historical weapons, says he began hand-forging tomahawks at age 12. It became a way of life for him, as he put himself through college selling hand-forged tomahawks and knives, and made it his full-time occupation once he graduated.

RMJ Forge's version of a modern tactical tomahawk, the Eagle Talon Special Forces Tomahawk. (www.rmjforge.com)

Originally, most of his customers were period re-enactors or people interested in early American history. He first made tomahawks specifically for members of the military in the spring of 2001.

The effort was sparked by a request from a friend in an Air Force security group who sent him an e-mail with a picture of an 18th-century spike tomahawk and asked if he could make an updated tactical version. Johnson's modern tomahawk is made from a single piece of steel, with synthetic scales on the grip.

It wasn't until after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks and the United States began fighting in Afghanistan that he started making them in quantity. In fact, it dramatically changed the way he does business — Johnson says his time is now almost exclusively devoted to producing the modern tomahawks for military customers, and he makes only a few historical tomahawks a month.

While these modern tomahawks do everything their frontier counterparts did, their makers say theirs are uniquely suited to challenges U.S. forces may face in urban combat.

The Web sites for both RJM Forge and ATC mention a variety of capabilities of their products, including breaching doors, smashing locks or tearing out windows to enter buildings, chopping holes in cinder block walls — and even punching through a standard Kevlar helmet.
 

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American fearmaker
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In addition to the tomahawk, paratroopers are also known to carry "war hammers" and have sharpened entrenching tools in their presence. A sharp e-tool can almost cut a man in half. Russian Spetnaz troops, their Special Forces, train with their e-tools for weaponry.

The war hammer is like a roofer's hammer, flat on one end with a sharpened end on the other. If you hit a guy in the chest with the sharpened end, it'll go most of the way through him. Hit him with the flat end and it'll compress his sternum into his chest and kill him that way.

All of these weapons are used for hand-to-hand or extreme close range fighting. Within the airborne, these weapons are loosely called "impact weapons."
 

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I help enlighten folks
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was thinking about adding one to my cold steel order. I wonder if they are any good or if there is a better place to buy one?
 

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Earthwalker.
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Stop trying to justify your existance here "tool". You could care less about a vietnam tomahawk. Besides, Obama doesnt like them, why should you?:D:
Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh NO Too Obamas name even being mentioned in the Knife section:xeye::eek:

No i say ''NOOOOOOOOOOOO'':eek:
 

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I was thinking about adding one to my cold steel order. I wonder if they are any good or if there is a better place to buy one?
Johnny, they are great. High quality pieces of work they are. You should buy one. Then stab yourself in the brain housing. Then we would like you:thumb:
 

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I have the Cold Steel one and the head is epoxied and will not withstand a lot of abuse. It didn't take long for the handle to become loose. I re-handled mine and ground down some of the rough edges and I like it more now. Take a look online, there are some nice makers out there with cool designs for a few more bucks.
 

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Proud American
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In addition to the tomahawk, paratroopers are also known to carry "war hammers" and have sharpened entrenching tools in their presence. A sharp e-tool can almost cut a man in half. Russian Spetnaz troops, their Special Forces, train with their e-tools for weaponry.

The war hammer is like a roofer's hammer, flat on one end with a sharpened end on the other. If you hit a guy in the chest with the sharpened end, it'll go most of the way through him. Hit him with the flat end and it'll compress his sternum into his chest and kill him that way.

All of these weapons are used for hand-to-hand or extreme close range fighting. Within the airborne, these weapons are loosely called "impact weapons."

are you talking about the small shovels they use? they use them like throwing axes. saw it on some military show.
 

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Never saw our troops with a tomahawk but the tribal Montagnards of the northern highlands of Vietnam used crude tomahawks, many of which had been in the family for generations. These implements were among their most prized possesions. I tried to trade for one of them but it was no deal. I had great respect for those people which continues to this day, even though I did pick up tuberculosis from them.
 

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Good question, and the first reply was a great response. I've personally been looking at the Strider Knives CR Hatchet.

Looking through many of the replies after that; I'm sad to see that the civility has left the room and that even intelligent responses which lack civility have left the room. We are left with mindless insults which lack context into the original question asked in the thread and which greatly decrease the value of information which this thread could contain.

--Wintermute
 

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Earthwalker.
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Good question, and the first reply was a great response. I've personally been looking at the Strider Knives CR Hatchet.

Looking through many of the replies after that; I'm sad to see that the civility has left the room and that even intelligent responses which lack civility have left the room. We are left with mindless insults which lack context into the original question asked in the thread and which greatly decrease the value of information which this thread could contain.

--Wintermute
Thats why i wrote what i did as Obama and any other politician for that matter or politics does not have a place here in the KS&A.

Putting it the way i did was my way of putting it nicely with out starting an agument,im sick of hearing about politics on this forum and don't want this section to be taken over by these political arguments and personal disagreements.

Sorry if it was mis-took as an insult that was not my intension.

Those Vietnam tomahawks look good to me,i wouldn't mind one.:thumb:
 

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Thats why i wrote what i did as Obama and any other politician for that matter or politics does not have a place here in the KS&A.

Putting it the way i did was my way of putting it nicely with out starting an agument,im sick of hearing about politics on this forum and don't want this section to be taken over by these political arguments and personal disagreements.

Sorry if it was mis-took as an insult that was not my intension.
No Sticks, I did not take your post as an insult or anything else derogatory. I took yours for what it was which was trying to keep politics out of an area they don't belong. The people who posted insults are the ones I was referring to, especially those with childish one word responses and the others with responses condoning violence to someone due to an apparent difference of opinion.

--Wintermute
 

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Earthwalker.
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No Sticks, I did not take your post as an insult or anything else derogatory. I took yours for what it was which was trying to keep politics out of an area they don't belong. The people who posted insults are the ones I was referring to, especially those with childish one word responses and the others with responses condoning violence to someone due to an apparent difference of opinion.

--Wintermute
wooo thank the lord for that,the last thing i want is to insult my knife buddies as this is the one place on the forum that i find peaceful and feel at home.:D:

It is very rare that an agument happens here and like you id like to keep it that way.:thumb:
 

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I help enlighten folks
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
OK, who else sells the Vietnam tomahawk besides Cold Steel?
Thanks for all the replies
 

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infowars.com
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my grandpa said he new tunnel rats in vietnam who would cary them

and this oldman i see fishing i saw him last night he was in worldwar2 and korean war
said he seen them but never used them him self

he licked the trench nife himself basicly brass nuckles with a fixed blade
 
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