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Wild persimmons (AKA American persimmon) are getting ripe here in Southeast Texas. Here on the farm there is an old persimmon tree that has been talked about in my videos for several months, and it is dropping its ripe persimmons.

The American Persimmon is native to North America, grows wild. drought tolerant, and requires very little care.


Some people may make them in Persimmon jelly or Persimmon jam.

Unlike a lot of wild edibles, the American Persimmon has a pleasant taste and is not bitter or tart.

Each Persimmon will be several seeds, so be careful when biting into it. One I ate yesterday (September 8, 2018) had seven seeds, while another had six seeds.

Local wildlife will feast on the dropped Persimmons. There is a large Persimmon tree on a rural county road near the farm that has deer under it almost nightly eating the dropped Persimmons.
 

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<--My Faverolle Chicken
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The tree out back is dropping them here in my yard too. I can't get any...my chickens and ducks find them first.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
Wild pe

Unlike a lot of wild edibles, the American Persimmon has a pleasant taste and is not bitter or tart.

ons.
Not as I've seen.

Asian yea....
Most of the wild persimmons on my place and growing about the region can not readily be consumed by humans when they first hit the ground. I am thinking of looking into ways to remove the astringency. This is for NWFL. I have been told there are some about that are good.
 

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"Dog" and I shared a few, from the ground this morning, after we got back from a walk. Mine are earlier than usual this year, perhaps because of the prolonged dry spell we've had for the last few weeks.

Location: Extreme Western Kentucky
 
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