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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Pros and cons of using a swamp as a bug out location?

Lots of water, though it would have to be filtered. Plenty of wildlife, fishing, small game, and birds.

Also lots of bugs, predators, and infections to find a cut in the skin.


In the 1990s my buddies and I would go camping in the swamps and bayous of Southeast Texas. We would also camp on the edge of a saltwater marsh from time to time.

Some of the biggest issues is mosquitoes, and being able to wash off. Unlike next to a stream or lake, swamp water stays muddy. It may clear up with reduced rainfall, but mud and filth is a problem.

Then there is the issue with flooding. Depending on location the swamp may flood with heavy rainfall.

Some swamps I camped in were somewhat well drained and only rarely flooded. These were along the gulf coast where the rain could drain straight into a river, then into the Gulf of Mexico.

Video was filmed and uploaded at 60 frames per second. If anyone can see the difference between this one and my other videos, please say so.

I got a new camera, a Nikon D3400 and this is one of the first videos I did with it.
 

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A swamp to me would be a plan B or C temporary location for strategic reasons but longer than a few days or weeks is not ideal.

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You may be used to and don't notice it, but newcomers to a swamp will itch like crazy if they get swamp water on them. Swamps are low oxygen waters, so bacteria is very concentrated there. If you have sensitive skin, it can literally "burn" you because the bacteria will be eating at your flesh. I've seen people get some pretty nasty rashes over the course of a few days.

Also, swamps are very tidal. Because of this, and the fact that most of the vegetation floats, there is a lot of movement of visual markers. A waterway that was there in the morning, may not be there in the evening. It's very easy to get lost and if you panic, your in big trouble.

If you find yourself caught in the swamp at dusk and can't get out, find dry land and find trees. Build you a nice nest that is 5-6 feet off the ground. As was mentioned before, mosquitoes are horrible, so I hope you prepared by having mosquito netting and spray of some sort. I've found that if you set off a bug bomb just before setting camp, it will help keep them at bay for quite some time. If you didn't prepare for mosquitoes, you can build a smoker fire. This is a small fire with green/wet vegetation on it to make it smoke a lot. You don't want a huge flame, just enough to provide some light and repel some critters. You mostly want the smoke. You can build it almost directly under your roost. Of course, the smoke will help keep the skeeters away. Just don't smoke yourself out... LOL.

Things to be wary of in the swamp:

Alligators (duh)
Mosquitoes
Ants
Snakes (especially cottonmouth)
Spiders
Bear (rare, but they are there)

Great topic for discussion. We really need more posts talking in detail about the various areas throughout the United States... Swamps of Louisiana, The Everglades, The Tetons, The Rockies, Sierra Nevada, Ozarks, Smokey Mountains, etc. with details on forage foods, animals to hunt/trap/be wary of, expected weather, terrain, so-on and so-forth.
 

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A swamp to me would be a plan B or C temporary location for strategic reasons but longer than a few days or weeks is not ideal.

Sent from my Note 8 using Tapatalk
It's not as bad as you may think. Ignore what you see on television. Your biggest danger is getting lost, not the animals. Surviving is actually easier here than anywhere else as far as food/water. As long as you know how swamps work, you'll be fine. Besides, I would love to have a secondary BOL like this:



Give me a decent size Jon Boat and a Kayak... I'll be in hog heaven.
 

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Oh... VERY VERY IMPORTANT.

Keep your feet dry. Do not let swamp water sit on your feet for too long or you'll get trench foot. There is a reason you see people with waders on... at least rubber boots.
 

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The closest we have to swamps are wet lands and sloughs. They'd be an ideal BOL as they have abundant fish and wildlife. Bugs would be an issue though, mosquitos in particular.
 

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It's not as bad as you may think. Ignore what you see on television. Your biggest danger is getting lost, not the animals. Surviving is actually easier here than anywhere else as far as food/water. As long as you know how swamps work, you'll be fine. Besides, I would love to have a secondary BOL like this:



Give me a decent size Jon Boat and a Kayak... I'll be in hog heaven.
My only experience in a real swap is ranger school, and it wasn't made to be comfortable, so I get I'd have more leeway as a civilian as far as gear goes but it wasn't pleasant and I wouldn't willingly be heading into a swamp anytime soon, unless you're inviting me to your BOL above, haha.

:thumb:

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one other thing is keeping food good. the swamp has plenty of food if you know what you doing, between the heat,humidity, and bugs you kill it you eat it or it goes bad!
 

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Hammock with a rain fly it is...last thing I want is to wake up next to a snake using me as a heat source to stay warm...
Better add a mosquito net to that hammock
 

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I think it would be a good place to go in a SHTF event. You won't get nearly the numbers of people escaping the event because of the hostile terrain.
 

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Master Mason
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I’ve got a mosquito net and rain fly hammock. And a little pillow. :thumb:

I love it. Swamps not so much.
 

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Nope.
I'd rather let the condominium yuppie zombies tear me limb-from-limb.
Give me a high-n-dry hillside with a Tennessee Breeze. A stream down in the valley.
A couple of dogs panting on the covered porch, ready to bark the moment a strange car
turns into the gravel driveway. Apple trees in the backyard heavy with fruit.

No desire to have fungus between my toes,
nor head on a swivel looking for gators and pythons.
The swamp is all yours KEV !
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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Lots of parasites and flesh eating bacteria.
Heck, Louisiana even has brain eating bacteria (Naegleria fowleri) in their public water system at the moment.

Finding dry stuff for a fire and place to put the fire might be challenging.

Mosquito borne illnesses and parasites. Dengue fever, Malaria
Chikungunya
Dog Heartworm
Yellow Fever
Eastern Equine Encephalitis
St. Louis Encephalitis
LaCrosse Encephalitis
Western Equine Encephalitis
West Nile Virus
Zika Virus

Gators, snakes, snakes, snakes, and more snakes, giant rats, fish with big sharp teeth.
 
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