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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm not sure whether this website has been posted before, so here it is again. Essentially it is a huge catalogue of different vegetable varieties with descriptions and reviews by growers. It's really been useful in planning what to try growing in my garden. As you know, seed suppliers aren't always honest in their product descriptions to getting the dirt from people who have actually grown the veg themselves is very helpful. Getting it all on the one page is even more so.

http://vegvariety.cce.cornell.edu/index.php


For a little taster, here is the listing for Sungold tomato:

Sub-Category: Cherry
Early-Season

Description: Early-season, hybrid, cherry tomato. 3- to 5-foot, Indeterminate vines bear sweet, 1 3/8-inch by 7/8-inch, oval to oblong, firm, meaty, clustered, golden-orange fruit with few seeds and free of cracking. For greenhouse or field production. Resistant to tobacco mosaic virus and fusarium race 1. Also known as 'Sun Gold'.
Days To Maturity: 57-60

Rating Summary

Overall: (4.4 Stars)
Taste: (4.5 Stars)
Yield: (4.6 Stars)
Ease/Reliability: (4.6 Stars)

And then it goes into the reviews, which are interesting in themselves. For example:


We have been growing this tomato for 4 years now. In our large garden it is always the first tomato to start producing, the last to give out, and EXCELLENT taste. Makes an excellent drying tomato - we just cut them in half. Also did well when we grew it in a container on our balcony.


I hope you enjoy it as much as I do! :thumb:
 

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That's a good beginning but also check your county Extension Office for the variety list that do well in your area. Also ask at local independent nursies (not so much the box stores) what they pick to sell. It is important to get as much info as you can to make the right choices.

Example: if I try to grow a Beefsteak tomato, I won't be happy with the results. The large variety tomatoes don't have enough time to grow here in Texas before the heat of summer kicks in. The smaller 6 oz and plum tomatoes do much better. The champ is the cherry size because they keep flowering well into the 90 degree temps all the way until the first frost.

:thumb:
 
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