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Dog bites - Owner shoots
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Upon thinking of things that would go first, this would seem like something many people may overlook. What is the shelf life of it and what other uses could we make of it? lubrication, fuel and cooking ... can anyone think of more?
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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Coconut oil has the best shelf life and I think it is good for you (that opinion is not shared but I like the work of Professor Mary Ineg.) Extra virgin olive oil well sealed will last several years. Pork fat (non-hydrogenated lard is also good for shelf life.) As you can see I am a contrarian when it comes to oils, avoiding corn oil, soybean oil, and canola.
 

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We purchased a huge jug of canola oil at one of those wholesale stores many years ago and we are just now nearing the end of it. This thing was stored, not in a cool cellar, but in the kitchen. Seems fine to me and the wife has no complaints (about the oil, anyways). Maybe I will buy several smaller containers for storage next time. That big jug was a pain. I must check out Razors suggestion of coconut oil. It sounds much more appetizing.
 

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Displaced Texan
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We purchased a huge jug of canola oil at one of those wholesale stores many years ago and we are just now nearing the end of it. This thing was stored, not in a cool cellar, but in the kitchen. Seems fine to me and the wife has no complaints (about the oil, anyways). Maybe I will buy several smaller containers for storage next time. That big jug was a pain. I must check out Razors suggestion of coconut oil. It sounds much more appetizing.
We've never invested in large quantity gallons of oil. That's because it goes bad quickly here. Olive oil does well in dark glass- so does vegetable oil. We just don't use a lot of it. Somewhere, here on this forum....I read that someone stores their olive oil in the bottom of their chest freezer. Wouldn't that change the molecular structure of the oil completely?

oh and Scruggs...
"Bring us some fresh wine! The freshest you've got.......this year! No more of this old stuff! What do you think I am, some kind of a jerk or something?"
 

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texjen - I am assuming you are from Texas. I am myself a displaced Texan. Back when I was still living in the Lake Texoma area, I bought a very large jug of extra virgin olive oil from Sam’s Club. I left it sitting right next to the stove on the counter top, and it lasted over a year, and I had no problem with spoilage. In fact, I moved, and gave a third of the bottle away to a friend’s family.
 

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Displaced Texan
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assumption correct. However I'm in Las Vegas for now- the heat gets to nearly everything. And rancid oil is a common affliction. I would like to build up a surplus of olive oil, if it were possible. I'd drop a benjamin on three or four gallons of it- but it just wouldn't be prudent to invest due to spoilage. We sacrifice a lot of things with regards to the heat.
 

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We've never invested in large quantity gallons of oil. That's because it goes bad quickly here. Olive oil does well in dark glass- so does vegetable oil. We just don't use a lot of it. Somewhere, here on this forum....I read that someone stores their olive oil in the bottom of their chest freezer. Wouldn't that change the molecular structure of the oil completely?

oh and Scruggs...
"Bring us some fresh wine! The freshest you've got.......this year! No more of this old stuff! What do you think I am, some kind of a jerk or something?"

LOL. You have a great memory. As a matter of survival - even if the cooking oil had turned rancid, there is no way I am going to tell my wife that what she cooked tastes like crap. +1 on not buying gallons at one time.

Do they dig cellars for houses in Nevada? I know they don't down south but I don't know if a cellar is common in Nevada or not.
 

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Gold memba-золот&#10
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Coconut oil has the best shelf life and I think it is good for you (that opinion is not shared but I like the work of Professor Mary Ineg.) Extra virgin olive oil well sealed will last several years. Pork fat (non-hydrogenated lard is also good for shelf life.) As you can see I am a contrarian when it comes to oils, avoiding corn oil, soybean oil, and canola.

May I ask the reason why are you avoiding corn, soybean and canola oils? I 've heard before that corn and sunflower oils have high content of saturated fat in it and trying to stay away from those. Curious what is your reasoning. Coconut is high in saturated fat as well, if you do care:) Sometimes I think it is all blown out of proportion though when it comes to saturated fat in this country, I dunno.

As far as olive oil, that's the best stuff in my opinion. But the most expensive as well. Hey, you get what you pay for. I think you 've heard that one before. When shopping for olive oil try to look if it says on the bottle "first cold press". That stuff is the best of the best. That oil was extracted the very first time from that particular batch of olives and has the highest nutritional value as well as other merits. Price difference isn't big enough to not justify getting it.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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We purchased a huge jug of canola oil at one of those wholesale stores many years ago and we are just now nearing the end of it. This thing was stored, not in a cool cellar, but in the kitchen. Seems fine to me and the wife has no complaints (about the oil, anyways). Maybe I will buy several smaller containers for storage next time. That big jug was a pain. I must check out Razors suggestion of coconut oil. It sounds much more appetizing.
Coconut oil is a short-chain saturated fat. That means two things. One, it has no place for an oxygen molecule to grab on, so it does not oxidize. Next, though saturated, the body sees it like sugar and uses it immediately, not processing it through the liver as fat. Thus it does not have the lipid behavior of fat. In short, it is very good for you. It is also very hated by the oil/medical industry.

The oil industry wanted soybean oil to replace coconut oil as the main vegetable oil and did so by bad-mouthing coconut oil, wrongly. Soybean oil is not good for you because of the excessive amounts of Omega 9s it causes, leading to heart disease. So canola was invented, it is purified rape seed oil, which like soybean oil, was until after WWII not considered fit for human consumption.

The problem with canola is that it has to be purified with chemical cleaners and heat to make it edible. This leaves chemicals and trans fats that they do not put on the label.

I use coconut oil, avocado oil, olive oil, sesame oil, and occasional pumpkin seed oil and macadamia nut oil...
 

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Displaced Texan
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.....Do they dig cellars for houses in Nevada? I know they don't down south but I don't know if a cellar is common in Nevada or not.
Yes they do. Not a typical tract-house development perk- but more for the custom home floorplans. Or you could simply have one installed. We're fairly close to "wine country" being next door to Califonia- there are a lot of wine connoisseurs here that have them intalled. However- the below ground temperatures here in the desert are much higher than those say....in Utah, for instance. Most of the basement wine cellars I have seen myself here in Las Vegas have to be temperature-regulated to remain at the typical 71 degrees. Or whatever the temp. It doesn't occur naturally. The crust of the earth warms here as it can reach upwards of 122 degrees on some days. There are nights that stay above 100 degrees in July/August. For several days (even weeks) at a time- not joking. When you see the news and the weatherman says "Vegas had a high of 118 today!"......just add another 5 degrees on top of it. Because that temperature comes from ONE reading at McCarran Airport. There are dips and dales across the floor of Vegas valley....ambiant heat, accompanied with asphalt & carbon monoxide omissions will brings temperature up even higher.
And Phoenix is always a couple degrees higher than us!:eek:

I've seen wine cellars here that are as big as a three car garage. I've seen built in humidors and cold storage for furs...and nuke bunkers that put Trump's penthouse to shame.

You can pretty much dig down as far as you need to here- the water table is far from the surface in most cases. I realize I ramble on...I rant & gripe about this hellish oven! But that, in a nutshell, is why food goes bad quickly here if you do not have the bucks to own a cellar.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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May I ask the reason why are you avoiding corn, soybean and canola oils? I 've heard before that corn and sunflower oils have high content of saturated fat in it and trying to stay away from those. Curious what is your reasoning. Coconut is high in saturated fat as well, if you do care:) Sometimes I think it is all blown out of proportion though when it comes to saturated fat in this country, I dunno. As far as olive oil, that's the best stuff in my opinion.
Corn oil is fine in corn. But corn oil is essentially cancer fuel. Cancer is unregulated cell growth. We get it every day of our lives and our immune system takes care of it. If the immune system does not the cancer continues to grow. Like every living thing it needs fuel. Not all cancers are alike. Some cancers can be controlled by a low carb diet, some can be control by a diet low in this or that fat. Corn oil is the preferred food of choice of many common cancers. A woman with breast cancer should avoid corn oil for her life. In fact, some studies are using coconut oil to fight breast cancer. If you are healthy and young corn oil is probably not an issue, but it can be.

Soybean oil throws the Omega 3's and 6's way out of balance. In our great grandparent's day, their ratio of omega 3's and 6's were one to one. Today they are one to nine. A century ago the only heart disease was congenital. Prior to WWII heart disease was uncommon. But right after WWII a way was found to make soybean oil edible and it was heavily promoted and turned into hydrogenated oil, a transfat. Our parents heart disease was caused by soybean oil and subsequent transfats, which is essentially a plastic in our bloodsteam we can get rid of, and it lasts for many years.

Unhealthy soybean oil consumption was reduce and canola was phased in. Canoal has to be bleached, deodorized and heated in the process to make it edible (otherwise it is a known cause of lung cancer. ) So the canoal oil in the store has several chemical residues and transfats from the heating. Indeed, there are no human studies that show canola is bad for you because they were never done. Convenient. However, several animal studies show canola to not be compatible with life.

Coconut oil has gotten a bad rap. It is dogma to diss it. A long time ago I read a statement by Mary Ineg, a lipid researcher. She said you can read a study on coconut oil in which the data shows it very safe but the conclusion of the study will say avoid it. I thought that silly until I read a meta study by the University of Michigan. It looked at 22 studies, 21 said coconut oil was great, one was neither good not bad. The conclusion of the meta study? Coconut oil is bad for you. Tis the politics of medicine.

Olive oil is good. It is the mainstay of the Cretan diet, and the Cretans even live longer than the Japanese (who by the way do not eat much soybean oil or unfermented soy products. )
 

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I'll never look at cooking oil the same way I did before all this great information. The local Walmart has no coconut oil so I guess it will have to be olive oil. Will check for "first cold press".
 
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