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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read that there are two foods that should be avoided if these were eaten in large numbers and they were each the "single" food source. Rabbit eaten entirely alone, and corn eaten entirely alone. What are the opinions. Has my leg been pulled? or is there some truth in this. I understand the odds are unlikely any of these has to be injested alone but am curious as to the reasoning if factual. Thanks
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Rabbit if it is your only meat will kill you. It does not have the right kinds of fats in it.

Corn [maize] must be limed to become a human food source. You can eat it anyway, but not as a major part of your diet. Raw corn does not have much in terms of nutrition for humans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How to stay alive in the woods

Thanks, I got the rabbit information in "How to stay alive in the woods" by Bradford Angier. I do not question what was written by this author, as all seems well written and accurate. However, the release date in my book says copyright 1956 and as much time has past I was wondering if it had been overturned. I do recommend this book as it is easy to read and was written prior to the new tech. we have all become accustomed to. Especially when this may not be available or desired. The second part "corn" came from a source I would like to remain anonymous as the actions this was used for is less than honorable. Wasn't questioning anyone, but wanted an unbiased opinion. Thanks for the answers.
 

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Patient Zero of WWZ
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Rabbit if it is your only meat will kill you. It does not have the right kinds of fats in it.

Corn [maize] must be limed to become a human food source. You can eat it anyway, but not as a major part of your diet. Raw corn does not have much in terms of nutrition for humans.
If you are worried about the low fat content of rabbit, bread it and fry it.

The lime thing is a myth. Corn is very nutritious and is a staple food worldwide.
 

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My Temperature is Right
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If you are worried about the low fat content of rabbit, bread it and fry it.

The lime thing is a myth. Corn is very nutritious and is a staple food worldwide.
Corn has a lot of calories, but not much real nutrition as a mater of fact a 600 calorie serving has almost no vitamin A or E and no vitamin D which means you will not absorb the vitamin A. and no calcium so you will not absorb the vitamin E.

If you do lots of manual work it's a cheap source of calories though, but you need other veggies to survive.
http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5687/2
 

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The lime thing is a myth. Corn is very nutritious and is a staple food worldwide.
Pellegra is a very serious nutritional deficiency threat when corn isn't grown in a propper manner. Corn is crap for nutrition when grown in most environments by people who don't know what they're doing. In the past, drifting from proven methods caused a period of problems.

I almost posted pictures of sufferers but they're pretty grim. If a person is more interested in niacin and other deficiency related diseases, it's worth checking.
 

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"Rabbit starvation" as it's called is very real, has to do with a diet extremely rich in protein and lacking other nutrients your body needs. It's not necessarily cause by eating rabbit specifically, just happens when your diet consists only of extremely lean meats such as rabbit, squirrel, venison, etc. without other foods to balance out the protein intake.

Never heard of any harm from eating just corn as your only source of food, but I can't imagine it would be good. Nutritionally corn isn't exactly a well-rounded food, makes sense it would cause some health problems if it was the only thing you ate.
 

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Tell the truth, coward.
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I have read that there are two foods that should be avoided if these were eaten in large numbers and they were each the "single" food source. Rabbit eaten entirely alone, and corn eaten entirely alone. What are the opinions. Has my leg been pulled? or is there some truth in this. I understand the odds are unlikely any of these has to be injested alone but am curious as to the reasoning if factual. Thanks
yes, danger. rabbit starvation (no fat, and protein is not easily digested.) and the corn thing is... oh. ask a mexican. Heh.

If you boil it in lye water for a while it unlocks the proteins but otherwise you can get a form of malutrition from it. that's why they eat it with beans, it provides the nutritional counterpart. It is a genuine problem and a bad one. I'll go on a linky hunt...
 

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Aha! a deficiency in Niacin, or B3 if you wish. Cured either by healthy diet, alkilinising the corn or eating brewer's yeast (or obviously, bread). Quote from wiki:

Epidemiology

Pellagra can be common in people who obtain most of their food energy from maize (often called "corn"), notably rural South America where maize is a staple food. If maize is not nixtamalized, it is a poor source of tryptophan as well as niacin. Nixtamalization of the corn corrects the niacin deficiency, and is a common practice in Native American cultures that grow corn. Following the corn cycle, the symptoms usually appear during spring, increase in the summer due to greater sun exposure, and return the following spring. Indeed, pellagra was once endemic in the poorer states of the U.S. South, like Mississippi and Alabama, as well as among the inmates of jails and orphanages as studied by Dr. Joseph Goldberger.

Pellagra is common in Africa, Indonesia, and China. In affluent societies, a majority of patients with clinical pellagra are poor, homeless, alcohol-dependent, or psychiatric patients who refuse food.[13] Pellagra was common among prisoners of Soviet labor camps, the Gulag. It can be found in cases of chronic alcoholism. In addition, pellagra is a micronutrient deficiency disease that frequently affects populations of refugees and other displaced people due to their unique, long-term residential circumstances and dependence on food aid. Refugees typically rely on limited sources of niacin provided to them, such as groundnuts; the instability in the nutritional content and distribution of food aid can be the cause of pellagra in displaced populations.
[edit] Symptoms
The dermatologic features of this disorder include desquamation, erythema, scaling, and keratosis of sun-exposed areas, all of which this patient had.

Pellagra is classically described by "the four D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia and death.[14] A more comprehensive list of symptoms includes:

High sensitivity to sunlight
Aggression
Dermatitis, alopecia, oedema
Smooth, beefy red glossitis
Red skin lesions
Insomnia
Weakness
Mental confusion
Ataxia, paralysis of extremities, peripheral neuritis
Diarrhea
Dilated cardiomyopathy
Eventually dementia



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellagra
 

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I wish I could remember the exact nutrients found/absent in corn, but it's been too many years since I took crop sciences class. I do remember that in most cases if you are able to get corn AND beans, you get nearly all the nutrients you need. that is why corn and beans is such a popular combination in traditional ethnic cooking from all over the world. they complement eachother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I don't want anyone to think I was bashing corn, this is far from the truth. I grow and eat it myself. And certainly all of us eat a diet balanced enough to prevent any adverse effects. I just thought some would be interested in this but wasn't sure on the facts.
 

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Patient Zero of WWZ
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Pellegra is a very serious nutritional deficiency threat when corn isn't grown in a propper manner. Corn is crap for nutrition when grown in most environments by people who don't know what they're doing. In the past, drifting from proven methods caused a period of problems.

I almost posted pictures of sufferers but they're pretty grim. If a person is more interested in niacin and other deficiency related diseases, it's worth checking.

Nutrition content of corn.

Pellagra is a vitamin deficiency disease caused by a chronic lack of niacin (vitamin B3) in the diet.

It's not caused by eating corn, it's cause by not getting enough niacin. Which corn is very lacking in.

If you are counting on corn in your preps add some lime to the shelf and learn to make hominy and traditional masa Harina.

Saying corn is bad or not nutritious because it doesn't have one particular nutrient is a tad short sighted. No single food has all the nutrients we need in the right proportions.

This does however point up the need to add a good multivitamin to your long term preps, and being sure to vary your diet whenever possible.


Quoted from http://www.nutritional-supplements-health-guide.com/foods-containing-niacin.html
Niacin foods include all lean red meat, fish, organ meats (kidney, liver), prawns, pork, as well as milk and other dairy products. Other niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat products, beans, rice bran, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.
So Lean red meat. :) Turns out rabbit is the perfect complement to corn in your diet. Kind of ironic considering how this thread started out.
 
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