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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an urban survival situation, its important for units to be self supportive. This includes being able to do basic repairs to the home or structure the people are staying in and growing a home garden. This is where the hand tools come into the picture.

Hammers



Unlike an air powered nail gun, or an electric powered nail gun, this amazing device only works with the swing of an arm. You hold it in your hand, grasp firmly and swing.

Every urban survivalist should have several good quality hammers on hand. Do not try to get off cheap. Go ahead, spend the money and get a quality product.

It has been my (Kevin) personal experience that hammers made in the USA are of better quality then those made in China. Also, buying made in USA products helps keep the factories here in the states. That keeps the jobs local which means less people on government assistance. So, buy American and keep your neighbors with a job. Or pay higher taxes and buy your neighbors food stamps, its your choice.

Be sure to include framing hammers for fixing walls and roofs, 4 pound hammers and 8 pound hammers in your collection.


Nails



To go with the nails. To use the hammer and the nails together – hold the nail between the thumb and pointer finger of your non-dominate hand and the hammer in your dominate hand. Strike the nail firmly in the top. It helps to if your wearing safety glasses, because sometimes the nail can go flying and may strike you in the eye.

For those of you that have never used a hammer and nail, its the way that boards are held together.

The romans used to have nails long enough that they would go through both boards. Once the nail is sticking out of the other side, the extra metal would be bent over. This would prevent the boards from pulling loose.

Number 10 and number 1 nails are a good all around size. With number 12 maybe being the better choice. If you buy nails in bulk, they come in a nice plastic storage tub which can be stacked neatly in a garage or storage building.


Chains



Used for pulling logs out of the roads or for towing cars and trucks that have broken down.

After a hurricane of tornado has passed through the area, it will be time to break out the chainsaws and start cutting up the fallen trees.

To save time and fuel, cut the tree up into sections that are big enough to where they can be pulled by a truck or car. This is where the chains and tow straps come into play.

Instead of cutting the trunk of the tree into sections 2 – 3 feet long, cut them into 8 – 10 foot sections and pull them out of road. Without a chain or a tow strap, there is no way to pull the trees out of the road.


Hand Tools



Basic hand tools are a must have for urban survivalist. You never know when your going to have to work on the car, truck, chainsaw or something else around the house. Examples include – sockets and ratchet, pliers, vise grips, files, wire cutters, channel locks, crescent wrench, pry bar, various metric and domestic wrenches.

Keep the tools on hand to be able to do back work on the car or truck. This includes replacing the fan belts, changing the tires, replacing the radiator hose, replacing the u-joints on the drive shaft,,,,, the list goes on and on.

If your concerned about the price of hand tools, shop around at the local pawn shops and keep an eye on the sales papers. Sometimes good buys can be found at pawn shops or flea markets.

Sometimes stores like Sears will run sales on package deals of their tools.


Chainsaws



Are an under valued tool in Hurricane and Tornado country. If you live an an area that is prone to Hurricanes or Tornadoes (wind storms) – you should have a good quality chainsaw.

After a wind storm has passed through, its common to see fallen trees on houses and blocking roads. The chains mentioned earlier and the chainsaws work together – along with some hard work and sweat – to clear a path back home.

This is one of the worst tools where you can try to get off cheap. Where there is a red oak, 3 feet in diameter laying across the road that you need to get through in order to get home, some cheap piece of crap aint gonna cut it. Invest into a good quality Stihl or Husqvarna. This makes sure that when you want to get home, you can. Regardless if its a pine tree, red oak, water oak or anything else. Get a chainsaw that will get the job done.

Most chainsaws require a gasoline and oil mixture and oil for the chain. Make sure you have plenty of those supplies on hand.



Axes



Excellent for helping to clear fallen trees after a wind storm and for chopping up fire wood. When the the chainsaws run out of gas and oil, the good ole axe will still be going strong.

For those of us that have a wood burning fire place, wood stove, or a bar-b-q pit that uses wood, a good quality axe is a must have. This is another item that should not be on the cheap list. Go ahead and spend the money to get a good axe and a few spare handles. Be sure to include some files for sharpening the axe after it gets dull.

Some of the newer axes have a fiberglass handles and require a special fiberglass repair kit. So when buying an axe, take the replacement handles into consideration.

Besides an axe, a splitting maul should be included in the urban survivalist tool kit.



Gardening Tools


During extended disasters, such as war, famine, disease outbreaks such as the plague, civil war, home food production of be a very, very important topic. To have an effective home garden, the proper tools are required. These include but are not limited to – hoe, shovel wheel barrel, rakes – some way to break up the soil and plant the seeds.
shovels




The food supply lines that keep the grocery stores stocked are very fragile. Factors such as the price of gas can have an impact on how expensive the food is and how much it cost to be shipped.

During times of civil unrest or out breaks of disease, its very likely that truckers will turn around and go home to be with their families. Taking whatever supplies that are in the truck with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You forgot crowbars!
Crowbars, good for everything. Including knocking zombies in the head. If it was good enough for Gordon Freeman, its good enough for me.

There was a grand opening for a hardware store in Beaumont, Texas weekend before last. So I walked around and took a bunch of stock pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don't forget the ever faithful (and useful) crosscut handsaw.

And that essential for construction and repair, the tape measure. Measure twice, cut once.

A level and some clamps are nice to have, too...
And here are some saws.
 

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awesome thread!
Bought a Chainsaw Sthil...paid alot for it but they are the best.When it comes to tools i try and buy the best i can. In canada at Canadain tire i spent 3 years goin to sale after sale to build up my lil workshop and im glad i did becuase its so nice not to borrow things.
 

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There's no "I" in Sheeple
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Hammer recommendation: Estwing 20 oz Straight Claw Hammer (like the one at center right in the first picture of the OP) - they are indestructible and perfectly balanced; carpenters swear by them

Also I recently grabbed a Flatbar for myself (also called a Utility Bar or a "Wonder Bar") - it's a small crowbar with a flat cross-section - incredibly versatile leverage tool

 

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AAAH GET TO ZE CHOPPA!
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Two things to add:

1. You can't beat experience, but the next best thing to have is one of those "for dummies" books on plumbing, home wiring, etc. A crisis is a crummy time to learn stuff on the spot, but having knowledge available in print form is better than saying "I wish I learned how to do xyz."

2. Be careful about keeping certain hand-tools in your car, especially in a city. Tools like SheepDog's flatbar are considered to be "burglary tools" in some of the more legislation-happy States.

Thanks for the post! I am moving into a new apartment and have been making my lists of things to buy.
 
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Bolt-cutters, nylon rope, quality duct tape, 6 mil plastic sheeting, tarps. Also, padlocks (you never know when you'll need those).

Great list, Kev!
 

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There's no "I" in Sheeple
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1. You can't beat experience, but the next best thing to have is one of those "for dummies" books on plumbing, home wiring, etc. A crisis is a crummy time to learn stuff on the spot, but having knowledge available in print form is better than saying "I wish I learned how to do xyz."

2. Be careful about keeping certain hand-tools in your car, especially in a city. Tools like SheepDog's flatbar are considered to be "burglary tools" in some of the more legislation-happy States.
Yeah I've heard that before too about the crowbars, I haven't looked into it just because it amazes and disgusts me that such laws could even exist...

As far as the "Dummies" books for learning skilled trades, I would say anything from the U.S. Military is way, way better... I've mined the internet for these types of e-books; the military courses on things like carpentry, plumbing, and machining put consumer references like the "Dummies" books to shame.
 

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Excellent post Kev. Might I add something?

Ropes! These can also be used for hauling logs out of an area. I don't know if you could haul an 8' section (although I would bet you could), but I do know that you can haul a 2' section by hand with any fibrous rope. Just put it underneath and be amazed by what friction can do!

Otherwise, an excellent guide for those who do not have my garage. The only question I must answer is WHICH chainsaw to use.
 

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Either a VERY big crowbar or one of those firemans multi-bars. Very necessary post-disaster. Or if you left your keys in the house:D:
 

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...
For those of you that have never used a hammer and nail, its the way that boards are held together.
...
That would be funny if it were not true.

Tarps are also a great addition. I found 4'x6' tarps on loss leader for 99¢ and bought ten of them. My parents told me I was being stupid but we used them to destruction over the next few years. Killed grass, covered loads, moved stuff; tarps have a million uses. We never needed to but we could have patched the roof or made a shelter.
 

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Of the tools I am willing to loan, the pipe wrench is the most requested believe it or not.

Amazing how many folks don't have one when they decide to fix the hot water heater or have an emergent toilet/plumbing issue.

Pipe threading tape! Essential for proper gas line repairs, and cheap.



Word to the wise: Unless you honestly don't mind if you ever see it again, never, and I mean never loan anyone your axe! :thumb:
 

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There's no "I" in Sheeple
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Either a VERY big crowbar or one of those firemans multi-bars. Very necessary post-disaster. Or if you left your keys in the house:D:
Hell if you want to go caveman and throw moderation to the wind, check out the offering from Stanley with the tongue-in-cheek name:

Stanley Xtreme FUBAR




It's 8.5 lb, 30" long and has a sledge hammer as well as some massive claws for gripping (and ripping) 2" boards - how you like 'dem apples?
 

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Instead of a pipewrench (stilson wrench) get a good Ford Wrench. The ford wrench is superior to the stilson wrench b/c the lower jaw is the one that adjusts thus locks down much better. The teeth gear on a ford wrench goes all the way down the handle, so it can be opened wider. It is a little harder to find, but worth the trouble.

A Ford wrench is also better than a crescent(monkey) wrench b/c the crescent holds on the end like a standard open end wrench. Ever have an open end wrench slip off? A ford wrench holds at a right angle. When locked down and (pulling into the head) the ford wrench rarely slips off.

p.s. an open end wrench that "ratchets" via cut-outs in its jaws will slip before anything else will.

p.p.s. a set of six-point sockets is commonly known as "the poor man's metric wrench". so instead of buying another set of metric sockets, get your standard sockets in six point. Rarely will you need 12 point sockets, and they slip much less often.


http://www.yardstore.com/browse.cfm/4,4486.html
 
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