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Hi everyone, this is my first post to this forum.

i have an idea for urban farming where the land holder would have enough produce grown on site to achieve farm tax status (not sure how that works everywhere), and can opt to have others grow the foods, and distribute through various outlets such as farmers markets, restaurants, churches, home delivery, etc.

I have been searching out technology that i think would be efficient enough to make this work. i am in canada and the farm tax thing is pretty simple from what i have learned so far. if you have over a hectare then you have to produce $2,500, and if you have less then 1 hectare then the activity needs to be 10K or more.

in vancouver bc 70% of pre tax income goes to housing expenses, don't ask me how they manage that, in toronto its 40%

i have found some technology that i believe will be able to produce the 10k a year within the size of a single car garage, and im just talking about growing lettuce and basil etc.

not all of us are going to be able to head for the hills when the **** hits the fan, nor do i think that its such a good idea even for those who are able to do so.

this is growing money while at the same time reducing the tax burden for urban property holders, and i know of many cases where retirees have to give up the homes that they have lived in for many years just because the home values rose so much that they where no longer able to afford the land taxes.
 

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10k worth of produce grown in a garage sized area seems like a bit of an ambitious goal. What is this technology you speak of?
 

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Here's my safety Sir
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I would be interested to hear what this technology is also.
 

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I've seen southeast Asian immigrants farm small plots of land they're given by grant or government programs, and I suspect that some people discretely farm public open spaces that are not well-traveled. Just figure out what is most hardy, low-maintenance, etc. for a particular soil and hardiness zone and lay in a bunch of seed.
 
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