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Grog
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Discussion Starter #1
Have friends who need a wee bit of where to start?
Here is an attempt for just that:
How to assemble an Emergency / DisasterKit and Supplies for you and your family.
Sources:
American Red Cross,
http://www.redcross.org
Federal Emergency Management Agency & Ready.Gov
http://www.fema.gov
Http://www.ready.gov
Disasters
•Natural , Earthquake, Flood, Fire, Hurricane, (Florida 2004, Thailand 2004, Katrina 2005)
•Manmade, Fire, Chemical Spill
•(Chernboyl ,Russia, Bophal ,India)
Many people were without protection or
resources before, during and after these
events.
Why Supply yourself?
•Article Published: Tuesday, September 28, 2004 Long lines for food, water, generators forming in Florida.
•4th hurricane in 6 weeks brings FEMA's biggest relief effort By Mike Schneider The Associated Press.
•Asia, Dec 26 2004Over 100,000 people were caught in Tsunami.
( The Pacific Ocean has better warning systems)
•Texas and Louisiana, hurricanes, relief delayed up to 3 weeks (21 days)
Earth Quake
FLOOD
FIRE, FOREST, WILD LANDS
Storm or Hurricane
Surviving a Disaster Your Family Disaster Supplies Kit, your plan and special considerations
•Assemble supplies
•Inventory special needs (special medications, foods, needs for family members with mobility concerns, hearing or vision issues)
•Preparing for known hazards (e.g. cold weather, earthquakes, floods, SARS type events, Bird Flu, Tornados , there was 1 in 2008 in Vancouver, Washington)
•Preparing for evacuation, or sheltering in place, home, work, children in schools.
•Other events, failing infrastructures, bridges out, etc.
•Power and or water outages
•Rising cost of fuels = higher food costs
•Loss of employment = Personalized Disaster
Creating a Disaster Kit
Learning Objective
Creating a Disaster kit for you and your
family in order to survive for at least 72
hours , Ideally longer in case of natural or
man made disaster or emergency.
Or …. Why wait in a line, when you can avoid waiting in line, for a while?
The BasicsEnabling Learning Objective 1
•Identify what you need
•How to pack it in case of evacuation
•Special needs for you or a family member or neighbor
3 Day Kit / 72 hours
•Assemble your kit into containers or packs for all family members
•Ensure kits are easy to get to, and to transport if evacuation is necessary
•Each kit contains only those items needed
•( More on special needs later)
•NOTE if special medical needs are an issue even in a 72 hour kit take 7 days worth of medicines.
Obtaining a re supply could be a while.
Kit continued
Needles, thread, Medicine dropper, Shut-off wrench, to turn off
household gas and water, Whistle, Plastic sheeting, Map of the area (for locating shelters)
Sanitation
Toilet paper, towelettes*, Soap, liquid detergent*, Feminine supplies* Personal hygiene items* Plastic garbage bag, ties (for personal sanitation)
Plastic bucket with tight lid, Disinfectant Household chlorine bleach , Mess kits, or paper cups, plates and plastic utensils*
Emergency preparedness manual*
Battery operated radio and extra batteries* Flashlight and extra bulbs, batteries* Cash or traveler’s checks, change* Non-electric can opener, utility knife*, Fire extinguisher: small canister ABC type, Tube tent, Pliers/,Tape, Compass, Matches in a waterproof container, Aluminum foil, Plastic storage containers
Informational check
•A basic Kit should have the following;
•Your 6 Basic groups:
•Water, Food, Clothing and Bedding,
•Tools, Supplies, First Aid Kit
•Those items that are not covered by the Kit, that you need, Walkers, additional support items, Bee sting kits, all items are situation based.
•Hold you for at least 72 hours.
•Be portable.
6 Basic Parts to your kit
1. Water, Minimum 1 Gallon Per person per day,
(Suggestion 2 gallons/person/day)
2. Food (pots, plates, flatware, etc.)
3. First aid supplies, (Special Medications)
4. Clothing and bedding, (remember weather conditions)
5. Tools and emergency supplies
6. Special items
Kit part 2
•Clothing suitable for local conditions
•Sleeping bags and or sheets and blankets
•Pets may NOT be allowed in a shelter if you have to evacuate, see pets section later in the presentation.
Additional Items in your kit
Can opener, heating equipment for food or drink, (e.g. Sterno and stove, heat tabs, MREs with heaters etc.)
Trash bags for waste, garbage, Toilet Paper and diaper wipes, soap, hand sanitizers, sealable container with lid or “porta potty” ( for extended use) First aid Kit, Flashlight with batteries and spare bulbs. Spare change ( $20.00 in coins, for payphones, and prepaid calling card) Addresses and phone numbers of relatives or friends to contact, use a source for family communications A friend can get the calls you can not, and inform other members of where you are and who has called ( Great for when you must evacuate)
Hygiene items, toothbrush, dental floss, toothpaste, soap,
tampons/MAXI PADS, shampoo, razors, lotion if needed.
Preparing your kit……….
One way to prepare is by assembling a Disaster Supplies Kit. Once disaster
hits, you won’t have time to shop or search for supplies. But if you’ve
gathered supplies in advance, your family can endure an evacuation or home
confinement.
•To prepare your kit
•Review the checklist.
•Gather the supplies that are listed. You may need them if your family is confined at home.
•Place the supplies you’d most likely need for an evacuation in
•an easy-to-carry container. These supplies are listed with an asterisk (*).
Kit Continued
•Water
•Store water in plastic containers such as soft drink bottles. Avoid using
•containers that will decompose or break, such as milk cartons or glass bottles.
•A normally active person needs to drink at least two quarts of water each day. ( note I personally recommend doubling this per person per day.)
•Hot environments and intense physical activity can double that amount.
•Children, nursing mothers and ill people will need more.
•here are six basics you should stock in your home:
•water, food, first aid supplies, clothing and bedding, tools and emergency supplies and special items.
•Keep the items that you would most likely need
•during an evacuation in an easy-to-carry container—
•suggested items are marked with an asterisk (*).
•Possible containers include a large, covered trash container,
•camping backpack, or a duffle bag.
•Store one gallon of water per person per day (two quarts for drinking, two
quarts for food preparation/sanitation)* (Note Double These Amounts)
•Keep at least a three-day supply of water for each person in your household.
More on Supplies
•Food *
•Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food. Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking and little or no water. If you must heat food, pack a can of sterno. Select food items that are compact and lightweight. (bring a small pot to cook in)
•*Include a selection of the following foods in your Disaster Supplies Kit:
Vitamins , Foods for infants, elderly persons or persons on special diets
•Comfort/stress foods —cookies, hard candy, sweetened cereals lollipops, instant coffee, tea bags.
A first aid kit* should include:
•Sterile adhesive bandages in assorted sizes
•2-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6)
•4-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6)
•Hypoallergenic adhesive tape
•Triangular bandages (3)
•2-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls)
•3-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls)
•Scissors
•Tweezers
•Needle
•Moistened towelettes
•Antiseptic
•Thermometer
•Tongue blades (2)
•Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant
•Additional medications as needed by family members (babies, elderly)
First Aid Kit part 2
•Assorted sizes of safety pins
•Sterile adhesive bandages in assorted sizes, 2-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6) , 4-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6) , Hypoallergenic adhesive tape , Triangular bandages (3) 2-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls) , 3-inch sterile roller bandages (3 rolls) , Scissors , Tweezers , Needle Moistened towelettes, Antiseptic , Thermometer , Tongue blades (2) , Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant .
Assorted sizes of safety pins , Cleansing agent/soap , Latex gloves (2 pair) , Sunscreen ,Non-prescription drugs Aspirin or non aspirin pain reliever, Anti-diarrhea medication , Antacid (for stomach upset) Syrup of Ipecac (use to induce vomiting if advised by the Poison Control Center) ,Laxative ,Activated charcoal (use if advised by the Poison Control Center)
•Optional additions :
•Portable Ice packs, Heat packs, SAM Splint, Space Blanket
•NOTE check any and all medications for expiration dates, check the kit and re stock when used or every 6 months minimum!
Special Needs part 1
•For Babies *:
•Formula
•Diapers
•Bottles
•Powdered milk
•Medications
•(Note Remember these are basics)
Special Needs part 2
For Adults *:
•Heart and high blood pressure medication
•Insulin
•Prescription drugs
•Denture needs
•Contact lenses and supplies
•Extra eye glasses
•(NOTE THESE ARE BASICS, Ask your physician or pharmacist about storing prescription medications. )
And of course………………
•Entertainment, Games and books
•Important Family Documents
•Keep these records in a waterproof, portable container:
–Will, insurance policies, contracts deeds, stocks and bonds
–Passports, social security cards, immunization records
–Bank account numbers
–Credit card account numbers and companies
•Inventory of valuable household goods, important telephone numbers
•Family records (birth, marriage, death certificates)
•Store your kit in a convenient place known to all family members. Keep a smaller version of the Disaster Supplies Kit in the trunk of your car.
•Keep items in airtight plastic bags. Change your stored water supply every six months so it stays fresh. Replace your stored food every six months. Re-think your kit and family needs at least once a year. Replace batteries, update clothes, etc.
•Ask your physician or pharmacist about storing prescription medications.
Examination
•How many parts to a disaster kit?
•How long should the kit last per person?
•How much water per person per day should be in your kit?
•If it applies, are special medical needs part of your family disaster kit?
•If it applies, does the section on people with disabilities have significance in your plan or kit?
•Do you have an existing plan?
•When putting food into your kit, what items should you include?
•What are two sources of information about emergency and disaster supplies and kits?
•How often should you check your supplies?
Answers
•How many parts to a disaster kit? 6
•How long should the kit last per person? 72 hours
•How much water per person per day should be in your kit? 1 gallon/person/day
•If it applies, are special medical needs part of your family disaster kit ?(yes/no)
•If it applies, does the section on people with disabilities have significance in your plan or kit?
•(yes/no)
•Do you have an existing plan? (yes/no)
•When putting food into your kit, what items should you include? ( Hint Slide 23)
•What are two sources of information about emergency and disaster supplies and kits?
HTTP://WWW.FEMA.GOV, Http://WWW.REDCROSS.ORG
•How often should you check your supplies? ( every 6months MINIMUM)
 

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I've been thinking, and the conclusion is I'm glad that I live in Europe. No earthquakes, hurricanes, foods (in my part of Poland). But still a lot can happen, I should at least think what could I do and where to go in an emergency, a vague plan is better then nothing :)
 

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not meaning to sound trite, but if you really want to help your friends, I would give them the link to this site and some others and tell them to do the research themselves.

that would be the greatest way you could help them, allow them to educate themselves, and you guide them along the way, instead of you doing everything for them.

hell if they need you to make this for them they prolly wont know how to best use half the stuff in there anyways.
 

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not meaning to sound trite, but if you really want to help your friends, I would give them the link to this site and some others and tell them to do the research themselves.

that would be the greatest way you could help them, allow them to educate themselves, and you guide them along the way, instead of you doing everything for them.

hell if they need you to make this for them they prolly wont know how to best use half the stuff in there anyways.
IMO the problem with most people is not that they couldn't figure out how to prepare, its that they don't think they NEED to. That is the biggest hurdle. To figure out what you would need is the easy part.
 

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To be truly prepared I think you have to have a "step up" plan. Kinda like the "defcon" system.

Step One: Acquire the knowledge. This sight and plenty of great books and other sites can help. Its essential to know what dangers are most likely in your area, ingress and egress routes. Location of potable water supplies. Basic first aid. Then expand your learning to include sustainability skills: farming, bushcraft, hunting, engine repair advanced first aid, etc.

Step 2: Everyday carry. Face it, the S could hit the fan while you're anywhere. The mall, the football game, the office. I never leave without my button compass and small leatherman. I also have an extremely small first aid kit (meds and band aids) that fits in a small pack that goes in my wallet. When we go on a day hike or something like that we have a small kit in a water bottle. 1st aid, space balnket, cheapo poncho, lighter and matches, meal replacement bar and whistle/compass/signal mirror. You can buy these commercially packed as "Survival in a Bottle" etc. I made mine because I wanted a metal bottle that could be used to boil water.

Step 3: Car Kit. I keep five gallons of ptable water in the truck. (Doesn't freeze too often in Mississippi) along with 12 MREs. There is also a basic auto repair kit including all the essential tools, fix a flat, flash lite, jumpercables etc. This is also the first appearance of weapons in my system. I keep a Glock 9mm with five loaded mags in the truck. (Wife has a .38 with five loads worth of ammo.) The idea with this step is that these items (along with my Get Home Bag described in Step 4) could sustain me and whoever might be with me if we are starnded and don't leave the car. (Obviously also advised to have a car charger for cell phone). I also keep an extra coat for each memebr of the family in the car (The vaccuum seal bags are frikkin awesome) and a pair og hiking boots for myself)

Step 4: Get Home Bag. My GHB is just that. A small pack with a 1 liter camel bak attachment. Inside is a tarp, first aid kit, paracord, a better knife, 1 MRE and a few meal replacement bars, flash lites, lighters and fire steel. There are other essentials but the idea is to keep it light and it is set up for really only about 24 hours. I could go longer by taking the duffel with the car's MREs and lugging the water. I actually changed mine over from a day pack (book bag) to a bird hunting vest. Has pleanty of pockets and two large game pockets that hold everything nicely and I was able to sew in a holster in the inside for the Glock. The entire purpose of this is to make it from the car to the house.

Step 5: Home supply: Stockpile food, meds and other essentials to last you and each member of your family for whatever period of time you feel comfortable. We are almost to six months and will probably keep going from there. I also keep my arsenal here. Along with my hunting guns (shotguns, 22 and my 270 deer rifle), I have 2 sks and an AK (Looking to add an AR or another AK). I like to shoot as a hobby so i keep a good supply of ammo and am always buting more everytime I see a good price. My goal here is to have the supplies I need to kep my family fed and sheltered as well as have the weapons needed to keep them safe if the worst happens.

Step 6 Bug Out Bags: Our Bobs are similar to the GHBs but set up for the classic 72 hours. I have separate duffels for ammo and plenty of rubbermade containers to pack up a lot of our home supplies. I also store atleast 25 gallons of gas and other auto essentials. These are set up to sustain us if we are forced to leave our home.

Step 7 BOL: I have 2. My Dad's place is farther out of town. He has a garden, a water well and plenty of room. The land is family land surrounded by cousins uncles and other relatives. All are hunters, one generation removed from amking their living farming. Their are mechanics, carpenters, nurses and farmers.
My second BOL is much further out, in the deep woods along the Mississippi River. Game and fish abound, water is plentiful and it is large enough that I have hunted there for years and never heard the sounds of civilization. It would be extremely hard to have to relocate the family there but if it is the only way to keep them safe then we'll do what we have to do.


I lived through Katrina. I did it before I was interested in prepping. "Ive stood in FEMA lines for ice and waited for National Gaurdsmen to pass out MREs. I know what it is like to have pockets full of cash but be unable to buy gas.

I won't do it again.
 

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Being Prepared

There are some people that (even some that were in Katrina), that don't want to be prepared for anything, they just think that if you prepare that bad things will happen.
I have a list of items that I keep in my BOB, and since I "Bugged In" for Katrina, the BOB came in handy as well as other things that I had prepared.
I upgraded and added things to my BOB, and some people won't even discuss being prepared.
You would think that they learned from Katrina, but maybe they just want another excuse to act like savages, and become criminals.
I wonder how any of them survived in life, with as stupid as some people can be.
 
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