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Zombie Exterminator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I would start a thread about all the uncommon stuff you can use in a first aid kit to save money or deal with specific problems. Mine is feminine hygiene products...

Tampons in the applicator are easily inserted into the chest cavity in the event of a GSW or other type of "sucking chest wound" which is any wound to the chest that causes negative pressure between the chest wall and the lungs to draw air in... it actually makes a sucking sound thus the name. They can plug the hole and you can apply one without losing it thanks to the string on the end.

Maxi pads -- cheap, super absorbent, and very compact, better than any 5 x 9 ABD pad I've used on a call.

Hope this is helpful
 

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In my time as an LEO, I got into the habit of keeping several white towels in the trunk. If there was an accident or an assault of some type where folks were bleeding but conscious. I could just hand them the towel and let them clean themselves up or hold pressure until EMS arrived, without me having to dive into my medical kit. It was simple but effective.
 

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Thought I would start a thread about all the uncommon stuff you can use in a first aid kit to save money or deal with specific problems. Mine is feminine hygiene products...

Tampons in the applicator are easily inserted into the chest cavity in the event of a GSW or other type of "sucking chest wound" which is any wound to the chest that causes negative pressure between the chest wall and the lungs to draw air in... it actually makes a sucking sound thus the name. They can plug the hole and you can apply one without losing it thanks to the string on the end.

Maxi pads -- cheap, super absorbent, and very compact, better than any 5 x 9 ABD pad I've used on a call.

Hope this is helpful
I'm no medic, but wouldn't that cause damage to take it out? ... In the way that the tissue would sort of bond to the cotton?

I just wonder because I've used gauze to cover burns/etc in the woods, and upon taking it off it takes a bunch of flesh and pretty much re-opens the wound. Not in all cases, but some.
 

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This is my new thing for my kit. Probably the first thing I have thought was important enough to add in about 6 years or so.

Activated charcoal !!! Starting to love this stuff the more I do with it and learn about it. Treats almost everything in some way or another.

I have a very extensive medical experience resume and I can tell you that I used to think this stuff was just for the ODs. Soooooo not true.
 

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I dont know how unusual, but got reading glasses in mine. Arms aren't long enough to reach the patient without them these days.
 

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Maybe not in my bag, but def with me. A Camera. There are some things that I may not see again for years. So its good to be able to document what I saw, what I did, what worked and what didnt. This way im more prepared the next time something similar comes along.
 

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I keep 25 feet of 1/4 inck copper pipe and a steel bottle with a threaded cap , and a large cork that fits into said cap.
Although not neccesarily a first aid item , it will make a quick simple still for making straight alchol for sterilising , or for distilling drinking water .
an ounce of prevention right ?
 

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1209
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Never put anything into a wound. Over, but not in.'


Just my opinion.
Jerry's da man.

In my life, duct tape (splinting, etc) and superglue. I've had better results with regular superglue than I've ever had from whatever "we won't stitch that, we'll glue it" product the local ER uses.

That blasted stuff was leaking bad before I even got back to my vehicle. Went home and took care of it myself.

Next time, my hide's getting stitched if I have to do it myself. Don't glue cuts that squirt with enough pressure to measure it in feet, no matter how small it is.
 

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Zombie Exterminator
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Never put anything into a wound. Over, but not in.'
If there is an open hole in the chest, plugging the hole is the first thing that even an EMT is taught. True it's not ideal but more effective than nothing. Combat medics have been using tampons in their trauma kits for a long time now with great success. The trick to sucking chest wounds is air cannot continue to get in. The best option is to use an occlusive dressing taped down on 3 sides to allow air out but not in. However, it's hard to do that to yourself so a tampon would be easiest to temporarily plug the hole until an occlusive dressing can be fashioned.
 

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If there is an open hole in the chest, plugging the hole is the first thing that even an EMT is taught. True it's not ideal but more effective than nothing. Combat medics have been using tampons in their trauma kits for a long time now with great success. The trick to sucking chest wounds is air cannot continue to get in. The best option is to use an occlusive dressing taped down on 3 sides to allow air out but not in. However, it's hard to do that to yourself so a tampon would be easiest to temporarily plug the hole until an occlusive dressing can be fashioned.
I was taught otherwise. And still believe surface bleeding to be a minor aspect of penetrating wounds and that inserting something into a deep wound has more risks than benefits. Perhaps as a very last ditch option. But I'm not a medical person. I will continue to do as I was taught but will keep it to myself after this.
 

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I had EMT Basic class 5 years ago, so not too out of date. We were taught not to insert anything into a wound, not even a sucking chest wound. (Now for the obvious bad humor, all chest wounds suck, if properly inflicted.) If you're alone and attempting to self-treat via ditch medicine, you're only risking yourself, go for it.

If I work on someone else, I'm going for the occlusive dessing, not sticking an expanding cotton plug into the chest wall in the hopes that it will saturate enough to act like an occlusive dressing. Cotton can let plenty of air through. Also, most of them really aren't as sterile as you might hope.
 

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Zombie Exterminator
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I guess I'm just saying that combat medicine is not like what I do with $75,000 worth advanced medical supplies in the back of a truck. Most people don't have the ability to do needle chest decompression in the field to relieve pressure that will eventually collapse the lungs and put too much pressure on the heart for it to beat. Bottom line is seconds counts because chest wounds can kill you fast. But it doesn't just have to be open pneumothorax other GSW also are well packed with these guys. More info here:

http://willowhavenoutdoor.com/featured-wilderness-survival-blog-entries/yes-thats-a-tampon-in-my-mouth-the-swiss-army-survival-tampon-7-survival-uses/

http://www.snopes.com/military/tampon.asp

http://iowatrooppantry.blogspot.com/2011/12/combat-first-aid-tampons-and-super-glue.html
 

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do not shove tampons into gunshot wounds. ever. they expand causing more harm and do nothing but soak up blood. soaked up is as good as blood poured out on the ground. you want to stop the blood leaving the vessels.
wound packing, use celox. at worst, use gauze. dont neglect direct pressure. lots-of.
sucking chest wounds are not as common as hollywood will have you believe. you need a bit of plastic and tape to rig up a one way valve dressing, or use asherman (or whatever the new fancy one is) seal if you have Gucci kit.
needle decompression is possible in the field with correct training.

my vital medic kit list is: duct tape, cling film, (saran wrap) duct tape, cloth, duct tape, sugar, and more duct tape. that, and plenty of medical training.
 

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Duct tape wins, instead of using a "spare" (LMAO, yeah, right) set of AED pads to remove hair as taught in classroom settings, the duct tape can take it off.
 

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Military MOM
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If there is an open hole in the chest, plugging the hole is the first thing that even an EMT is taught. True it's not ideal but more effective than nothing. Combat medics have been using tampons in their trauma kits for a long time now with great success. The trick to sucking chest wounds is air cannot continue to get in. The best option is to use an occlusive dressing taped down on 3 sides to allow air out but not in. However, it's hard to do that to yourself so a tampon would be easiest to temporarily plug the hole until an occlusive dressing can be fashioned.
I'm a former paramedic and firefighter and vet. DO NOT put anything IN the open wound! If it is a sucking chest wound, put cling film or a plastic that can stick and seal the wound! Panty liners pads are really great to put over a wound that is bleeding (you usually don't need the full maxi pad), and regular flour can also stop the bleeding of a wound.
 
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