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Looking ahead
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Discussion Starter #1
Here's how your employer being unprepared can affect you. Here's my situation from several years ago at a nursing home of about 120 beds which was prone to power outages.

Starting off a 3p-11p shift I can hear the emergency generator running in the back where I park. Inside the place is a mess with people not knowing what to do (yeah after all this time they still have no plan). Apparently the power has been out for most of the day.

Throughout the hallways there are red emergency power receptacles which the generator supplies the power for. The receptacles are used for electric O2 generators the many beds that use special air mattresses (they help prevent skin breakdown) and some other essential equipment.

Currently the DON has sent someone from maintenance to the Home Depot to buy extension cords, flash lights and a few other things that I don't understand why we didn't already have. All we had were about a half dozen extension cords and the same amount of cheap DOLLAR STORE flash lights :eek: with of course dead batteries!

Well an hour or so later the power comes back on and no joke the DON rushes to the phone and calls the guys from maintenance and tells him to cancel the purchase!!! The guy from maintenance later told me he was literally at the register about to swipe the credit card when he had to tell the clerk he wouldn't be able to purchase the goods after all. Like were never EVER going to lose power again and may need those things :rolleyes:. I wonder what the night shift should do if the power goes out and theres no stores open.


Well fast forward several weeks to around the 10p hour and the impossible:rolleyes: happens, we lose power. Same lack of power cords, same dead cheap flashlights and now no sunlight or open stores either. Luckily I had about three really good lights in my car including a headlamp thats worth its weight in gold. Theres just some things (like most things) that you just can't do while holding a flashlight with one hand. Wish I could say I saved the day but that wasn't really possible. I pretty much made the best use of the equipment available. Got people out of bed who had mattresses that ran on electric (they deflate rather quickly) and changed people on O2 to the cylinder tanks to get by till the power came back. Once I felt the residents were taken care of I left for the night.

I'm so glad I don't work at that place anymore.
 

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Scandinavian survivor
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4,106 Posts
Ten days ago we had a meeting where I brought up the the preparedness level at my work place. Needless to say, working in a european city, it´s next to nothing. I was listened to and was given the responsability to get my work place a decent crisis management plan. As I work with sick and disabled people a major power cut was my biggest concern but the weather is also a factor, living in Scandinavia as I am.
The day after I was away at a doctors appointment with a patient when my phone rings. A co-worker tells me the power has been out for an hour. No working elevators, no working beds or airmattresses, no light. I guess I could suggest just about any measure to be taken now...
 

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hej in sweden and my girlfriend linnea is from helsingborg and has been living in new york for 5 years.and as a doctor with invaluable skills,you are lucky as everyone will be helping you in any survival situation.
 

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In most work places your not going to find emergency response plans other than your basic fire drill and quick evacuation plan.
Years ago I worked at a local fish processing plant , they did have their sh*t together.
A bunch of us were sent to advanced 1 st aid classes, firefighting and chemical response classes.
We had lockers through the plant with "Scott packs" breathing units , like fire fighters use. To get into area's where there could be a chemical or gas leak.
Wish other employers would be that concerned for their employees.
 

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25 Or 6 to 4
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8,006 Posts
We have arks hidden at each facility. They contain enough to keep core staff or 1/3 at work and fed and watered for about 10 days if they can not go home or a full staff for the usual 72 hrs. In the Arks are stored other business related diagnostic equipment and tools and things to keep going or repair our systems, as well as a full compliment of sat gear, for comms and sat network comms.

yes all my idea and planning. its just a matter of convincing other people (the sheep in charge) that they thought of it first. ;-)
 

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I'm lucky that I'm the guy in charge of my unit where I work. We keep 10 days worth of bottled water on hand plus we have several live wells on location. For food we have about 30 cases of MRE's. Every employee is responsible for ten days worth of food and water for all dependents that they bring to the site in case of emergency. Our generators have enough fuel for two weeks. We have several forms of communication including sat phones. We are all First Aid/CPR certified and have been supplied with extensive first aid bags for each vehicle and each manned structure. There are still several items I'd like to get but I feel we would be fine in an emergency. We've gone through several hurricanes with no problems due to supplies.
 

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Looking ahead
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2,178 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Wow, some of the jobs you guys work at really have their act together!

Breathing units, 30 cases of MRE's, AN ARK :eek:! I can't believe this. Those plans make every job I've ever worked at sound like leaky tin roof shacks. Good for you guys!

Though the job I work at now is much better I have learned to rely on myself due to the non-existent preparedness of my former employers. It's also another reason I don't put tacticool swat ninja clothes in my BOB. You never know when you may just want a plain change of clothes plus blending in helps. My BOB lives inside my cars trunk because I'm away from the home more than half of my day so odds are if I need some items I'll need them while I'm not home.

I have tried to learn from the experiences both good and bad, and if someone else can learn something from my experiences then thats even better.
 

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I work for a 400 bed hospital. If there were ever fuel shortages and food shortages this place would be ****ed. They rely so much on trucked in food to feed the patients i.e. Sysco services etc. I've often thought about bringing up an emergency food storage program up. This is CA and even without that, just an earthquake would disrupt this entire hospital. If I was in charge we'd have a huge storage locker or a few cargo containers on the property with MRE's, freeze dried, canned food to feed several thousand people for atleast a month. My hospital is still a very profitable hospital and has the money to do it.
 

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veldskoen no socks
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2,715 Posts
Alaskan is right, most companies only have an evacuation plan for a fire alarm.
I can see the importance of a more detailed plan of attack from places where most or all the staff are inside during normal working hours, hospitals, offices, banks etc but if you are like myself where you are out and about, sometimes for a portion of your day inside ,then you only have to think about your own saftey, easily done but nothing but blind panic for those in darkened or smoke filled rooms.
Like most places it takes more than one incident before buildings get their $hit together only to find when the gear is needed, no body has maintained it or even knows where it is.
 

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Watchin tha world go by
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8,151 Posts
we only have one emergency plan at work --- hit tha kill switches and run like hell.
in event of emergency ya wont need flashlights to see at night.

but then i work on a gas drillin rig.
 

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cute is not always enough
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2,232 Posts
Every time we would get a bad snow storm HR at my previous employer would send out the same e-mail, "show up for work or you do not get paid". It was really sad. Only about 10% of the staff had to be physically at their desks to do their work. Everybody had laptop computers that they took home with them. Encouraging people to drive through miserable dangerous weather was not very responsible, IMHO.
 
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