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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In 2008 as Hurricane Ike was approaching the gulf coast, a buddy of mine (and a member of this forum) heard the news of the storm surge, heeded the warnings and decided to evacuate. He called me and asked if he could stay with my family, I told him "of course."

When he loaded up his truck, he did not bring a lot of his preps or gear. Just about all of his firearms were left behind, just about all of his canned food stocks were left behind. The reason everything was left - because he did not think that the storm surge was going to reach his house. As far as anyone knew, the area where he lived had never flooded.

When we reached his house (2 days after Hurricane Ike passed through), his house had received about 2 - 3 feet of flood water. This was not fresh water, this was muddy salt water from the local marshes.

As Hurricane Ike was approaching Houston, my parents kept hearing the warnings of a deadly storm surge. Nothing had happened during Hurricane Rita, so they almost stayed during Hurricane Ike. Good thing they evacuated, their house got 9 feet of storm surge flood water.

2 of my kids were with their mother (my ex-wife) in Houston, Texas when Ike made landfall. Later on my kids told me how unprepared they were - they did not have any working flashlights, no way to cook their food without electricity. Even though they had an outdoor grill, they did not have any propane or charcoal for it. For food, they had to make trips to the local food line - which was demoralizing.

It was something like 4 days after Hurricane Ike passed through, my ex-wife called and asked if I could get the kids. Power had already been restored at my house, so everything was starting to return back to normal. But even if power had not been restored to my house, I had ways to cook hot meals and the kids were out of Houston.

Just about everyone that I had talked to, had underestimated the power of Hurricane Ike - mainly because they had been through various disasters and nothing bad had ever happened before. Since nothing had happened in the previous hurricanes, there was no need in worrying about it now.


In the above examples we have focused on Hurricanes. But its not "only" hurricanes that we need to pay attention to. For years the World Health Organization has been watching the Bird Flu. Then all of a sudden the Swine Flu shows up on the scene. Even though a lot of people died from the Swine Flu, it was not the killer that the health officials said it was going to be.

Just because the bird flu has failed to make its appearance, and the swine flu turn out to be less deadly then excepted, that is no reason to let your guard down.

It is impossible to stay in a constant state of readiness. But it is not impossible to pay attention to the news, and take the situation seriously. When the news warns of a new flu (or disease), or a hurricane, or a flood, we need to pay attention and heed those warnings.

If you take the easy way out and say "nothing is going to happen." You might have to spend a lot more time rebuilding after the fact.

And its not just physical action, its also financial action. Even though you may not live in a flood plain, do you live close to a stream or river that could ever flood. Some floods are called "100 year floods" - meaning it only floods once per 100 years. But when the next flood happens, will it be your turn?

If some kind of natural (or man made) disaster happens, will you have the financial coverage to rebuild?
 

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Bird flu is still percolating in SE Asia. It hasn't made the leap to easy human to human transmissability, and hopefully it never will, but it's something to keep an eye on.

Now would be a VERY bad time for it to mutate into a human pandemic, because people are so burned out / dismissive because of Swine flu, they wouldn't react to Bird flu until victims were packing hospitals and dying in the streets...
 

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Profiling... it works.
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So true...

I had four families staying here during and after Ike..... everyone of them
lost their house, from an area that had never flooded. Be aware, be prepared.:thumb:
 

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i live in a "100 year flood" area. thankfully, the city council actually recognized this and took steps to prepare for the possibility of the "100 year flood" coming. it was the first i heard of the term, and when they were doing whatever they did to prepare for it, it made me rather pleased.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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We had our 100-year flood two years ago.

It was good to see and learn how high our river can really rise.

Our road flooded, our basement flooded, and we lost a lot of chickens [our chicken coops were underwater].

Now we feel that we are much better prepared.
 

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i live in an area where a freak tornado could possibly strike, and where a freak earthquake may occur. these are the two things that worry more than anything; i live in the second story of a two story condo.
i've prepped as best i can until i can sell and get to a ground level that would be more stable in these scenarios.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hurricane Ike

I had four families staying here during and after Ike..... everyone of them
lost their house, from an area that had never flooded. Be aware, be prepared.:thumb:
You must be talking about Bridge City.
 

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I travel light
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We don´t underestimate the danger of a sudden violence burst, given the fact of Colombian paramilitary trying to make attempts inside our frontiers. We´re organizing even a few surprises for the groups of thugs involved in this kind of things.

Power to the people.
 

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Prep to LIVE a good life!
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Great post Kev.

In every aspect of life my Dad always taught us that you can never underestimate your NEXT opponent.

You may have beaten the last 20 guys who picked a fight with you, or gotten through the last few tornados, fires, or economic hardships by luck or a littel preparation, but it only takes one situation you're not prepared for and you can lose the life you've worked so hard for.
 

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They don't "think it's going to happen" is what it always comes down to. It's really easy to be blindsided with that mindset.

Speaking of floods, I've had the prepper mindset for a long time, yet I was blindsided by a flood. We simply don't get floods here...ever. Apparently we have a 500 year flood cycle though. Back in 2006 we just about got washed off the face of the earth. I "didn't think it was going to happen" and it did. Luckily it didn't take out my house. But I had to grab bug out gear and bail. I spent a couple days camped in the desert, uphill from the valley I live in. I had no flood plan, so all I could do was put everything of value, guns, guitars, etc., up as high in the house as I could and hope for the best.
 

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Good post, Kev. Don't forget that's it's oh so much easier to assume the worst won't happen than to go to the effort of preparing. This is the mindset that a lot of folk have, and as your story shows, it extends to those of us who do prepare, too.
 

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Looks like rain to me.
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Great post Kev,

The thinking here applies to almost any event. I'm suceptable to fire or snowstorms. Same thing, the power of nature applies.


"If you want to hear God laugh, tell him your plans."
 

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Good post Kev.

I also want to make a comment, or perhaps add to Kev's post that most people will underestimate, or outright miss, the speed with which a situation can deteriorate. Reaction time is very critical when an "event" happens and thinking clearly and thinking for yourself has never been more important.

If I am okay, it is not because some government official told me so. If I am in danger, it is not because some government official told me so.

Think for yourself and react. Although doing nothing is certainly an option and in many cases a viable one, it can mean the difference between life and death. Think WTC on 9/11.

The speed with which a situation can deteriorate is not to be underestimated.
 

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The QLD east coast has just had a Cyclone cross, causing widespread damage, mainly to infrastructure.

The warnings had been there for at least three days, yet people were caught short of fuel, water, and cash (auto tellers) when the power grid failed.

Reportedly, some back packers short of money to buy food were foraging food from super market dumpsters.

I spoke to friend in the effected area, eventually, he had lost power, his cordless phone system failed, mobile/cell phone services were effected.

Yet again, this shows how unprepared, or complacent people are despite repeated warnings in an area which is reknowned for these seasonal wheather events.
 
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