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AKA The Dragon
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UK records first swine flu death
Posted 30 minutes ago
Updated 7 minutes ago


Swine flu has so far infected almost 30,000 people in 74 countries since it was first detected in Mexico. (AAP: Paul Miller, file photo)

Related Story: Lacrosse team in swine flu lockdown A patient suffering from swine flu has died in hospital in Scotland, authorities say.

It is the first death of someone with the virus outside the Americas.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/06/15/2597830.htm
 

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Pantomime Villain
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"The Scottish government says the victim had other underlying health problems."

So this could have been an elderly person with a poor immune system that could have succumbed to pretty much any illness above the mild end of the scale.

I'm not buying into this mass panic - flu is a seasonal thing and it happens every year and along the same lines of scale. The experts and the media love to big up this sort of thing for their own ends. The Government are making rather more of it than usual to distract us from their dismal failure in pretty much every arena - it's about the one thing that they can't be blamed for.
 

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"The Scottish government says the victim had other underlying health problems."

So this could have been an elderly person with a poor immune system that could have succumbed to pretty much any illness above the mild end of the scale.

I'm not buying into this mass panic - flu is a seasonal thing and it happens every year and along the same lines of scale. The experts and the media love to big up this sort of thing for their own ends. The Government are making rather more of it than usual to distract us from their dismal failure in pretty much every arena - it's about the one thing that they can't be blamed for.
We don't get the flu in the summer. This is different. This is a new virus justy like the one in 1918.

If anything the .gov is downplaying this to prevent panicked people from flooding over crowded hospitals when they say people that have died from this had a 'pre-existing' condition because it makes it sound like they were the walking dead.

There was initial media coverage in the beginning of the outbreak in Mexico but it has fallen off since no one cares anymore since its not affecting them. I've had to dig for news stories about all the deaths everywhere. Usually find stories in local news outlets or the foreign press (like China). If they were trying to whip up hysteria they would have every death (already 60 something here in the US) on the national front pages every time someone died.
 

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Scottish mother first UK swine flu death

Swine flu has claimed its first victim in the UK with the death of a Scottish mother - days after she gave birth to a baby prematurely.

The 38-year-old woman from Glasgow, named locally as Jacqui Fleming, is the first person to die of the virus outside the Americas.

The woman had been under intensive care at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley since last month. Officials said she had been suffering from underlying health conditions.

Her baby, who was born around 11 weeks early, was being treated at Yorkhill hospital in Glasgow but is understood to have tested clear for the virus. The death is the first in Europe from the H1N1 virus and brings the worldwide death toll to 146. Nearly 500 people in Scotland have now tested positive for swine flu.
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Scotland remains one of the worst-hit nations relative to population size in the global pandemic, with more than one-third of the UK's total of 1226 confirmed infections.

Official predictions are that between 25% and 35% of the Scottish population is expected to contract the virus - the equivalent of 1.7 million people.

However, so far the vast majority of cases have only displayed mild symptoms.

Professor Hugh Pennington, a bacteriologist at Aberdeen University, said underlying health problems were likely to have been a "significant factor".

He said: "It's very sad but with the number of cases we have seen it is really something which was always going to happen sooner or later. Unfortunately it is to be expected. This is what the authorities have been saying will happen for a long time.

"It does not point to the virus getting nastier. All the evidence to date suggests the virus is not changing at all. This is a flu virus, it is in no way different from an ordinary winter flu virus, so if there are enough cases some people will have to be admitted to hospital and some will die."

Neighbours in the Carnwadric area of south-west Glasgow said last night that the victim had a teenage son and a younger boy, who was still in primary school.

A resident of her block of flats, who did not wish to be named, said that the family wanted to be left alone to come to terms with the tragedy.

Another teenage neighbour, who said he had known her son from his time at a local secondary school, said the woman had previously suffered from strokes or seizures and had been critically ill in hospital for a significant period of time before her death.

News of Mrs Fleming's passing spread quickly through the close-knit community, and neighbours stood in silence at the fence outside her home.

The block of flats where she lived is yards away from St Vincent Primary School. One pupil there has already contracted the virus. The P5/6 composite class were sent home last Thursday but are due to return on Friday.

A 23-year-old nurse who treated the woman at the Southern General Hospital has also tested positive for swine flu but is not thought to be seriously ill.

Earlier yesterday, officials confirmed 35 new cases in Scotland, taking the total number to 498.

Of the new cases, 32 are in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde area, and the Highland, Forth Valley and Grampian health boards have one new case each. A further 175 cases are under investigation, said the Scottish Government.

A total of 10 people are being treated in hospital. Professor Pennington said it was very difficult to measure death rates from flu, but one death out of more than a thousand cases was "quite unremarkable" and compared favourably to ordinary seasonal flu.

He said anti virals could help make flu easier to manage but they were "not a magic bullet" and worked best if administered very early on in the infection.

"Anti virals damp down the virus but they are not curative, and once symptoms have developed they don't work nearly as well," he said.

The virus develops as pneumonia, attacking cells lining the lungs and preventing the transfer of oxygen.

Scottish Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon said last night: "I'd like to express my condolences to the patient's family and friends. This is a tragedy for those concerned and they have my heartfelt sympathy.

"Tragic though today's death is, I would like to emphasise that the vast majority of those who have H1N1 are suffering from relatively mild symptoms. I would reiterate that the risk to the general public remains low and we can all play our part in slowing the spread of the virus by following simple hygiene procedures."

So far only one person over 65 has been infected in Scotland, compared with 88% of the cases in the under 45s. The reason is believed to be that older people have lived through the flu pandemics of 1957 and 1968. Although these were different strains of flu, older people may have gained some resistance.

Chief Medical Officer Harry Burns predicted last week that the number of cases would peak in mid-June, but authorities now believe around one-third of Scotland's population will contract swine flu.

Health authorities have now given up trying to contain the virus in the hardest-hit area around Glasgow, Argyll, Bute and Paisley, and are preparing themselves to cope with a prolonged outbreak over a wider area.

Anti-viral drugs such as Tamiflu are now only being given out to close contacts of the infected, whereas previously they were dispensed to a wide network of at-risk neighbours and colleagues.

Diagnoses will also be made in doctors' surgeries and hospitals as overstretched laboratories struggle to keep up with the backlog of suspected cases. However, concerns have been raised that frontline medical staff are being put at risk of contracting the virus from patients undergoing treatment.

Two doctors have already been confirmed as victims, and a paper from Health Protection Scotland last week reported that protective masks were not made to fit 50% of staff who used them.

Dr Margaret Chan, director general of the World Health Organisation, said last week the world must "brace" itself to expect further deaths.
 

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Even if the death rate were no different from regular influenza, it will still rack up a MUCH greater toll. Most deaths from regular influenza are in the elderly, very young, and very frail (as it should, unfortunately). But because the swine flu is novel, it's dropping people in the 18-65 range too.

Having a rate in some sub-population is one thing. Having that same rate in the whole general population is quite another. You're literally talking millions of people dead.

The deaths are not very high yet, but that's only because it hasn't penetrated that deeply. <1% of the world infected. It's still very, very early.
 

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The baby just died too... :(

Double loss for swine flu family

The family of the first person in Europe to die after being diagnosed with swine flu has suffered a double tragedy with the death of her baby.

Jacqueline Fleming, 38, from Glasgow, died on Sunday at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley.

Her son Jack, who was born 11 weeks early, died a day later in a special care baby unit at the same hospital.

The baby was not infected with the Influenza A (H1N1) virus. He was two weeks old when he died.

Ms Fleming had been suffering from underlying health problems since the birth of her son.

In a statement, her partner William McCann said it was an extremely distressing and difficult time for the family.

He said: "My beautiful son was born on the first of June 2009, 11 weeks early.

"He suffered from a number of complications and despite his brave fight he passed away earlier this evening at the Special Care Baby Unit at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley."

Ms Fleming lived with her two other children - one aged 18 and one of primary school age - and her long-term partner in the family home in Thornliebank, just south of Glasgow.

William Docherty, who knew Ms Fleming, told BBC Scotland he believed she had been admitted to hospital following a stroke.

A female friend of the family said: "I think they are taking it really badly. She was in hospital for a couple of weeks and there were days she was getting better and days she was taking a turn for the worse.

"They hoped she was going to pull through and it was a shock when she died. The family are really devastated."

She added: "She was a really nice lady, really kind, a quiet woman, just a family person really."

Scotland Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon said: "The death of baby Jack, especially coming so soon after the death of his mother, is a tragedy and I extend my deepest condolences to their family and friends for this unimaginably painful loss."

A further 71 new cases of swine flu have been confirmed by GPs in Scotland , bringing the total to 569. All of the new cases were in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS area. More...
 
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