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Possum Lover
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15,309 Posts
Well, we don't have guns anyway. If you don't know why a long timer will probably tell you.

Anyway, with what I have heard of it for chronic pain I would LOVE to see my husband on it. However, right now it would violate his contract with the pain doctor.

I have considered getting the oil (100% legal, I am told) and using that for my headaches.
 

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Hubris begets Nemesis
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Did you read the proposed bill?

This is NOT a legalization of recreational pot.

Its a farm bill that would allow farmers to grow industrial hemp, an product that has essentially no THC, the active ingredient of pot.

Its also controversial because the bill, as proposed now, excludes anyone who has a prior pot conviction from participating in this industry.

Presumably, if someone convicted of a pot crime has served their time, they've paid their debut to society. But this bill would exclude these people.
 

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Last year Wisconsin allowed growing of hemp for CBD oil production. The farmers had to jump through a bunch of hoops to get the permit to grow it. But once they were okayed to grow it there was a lawsuit saying growing hemp was fine but it couldn't be processed into CBD oil which pretty well took away any reason to grow the crop. I am not sure how it ended up but I know at least several of the farmers decided not to plant it until things were more stable.
 

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Retired kafir
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17,205 Posts
Did you read the proposed bill?

This is NOT a legalization of recreational pot.

Its a farm bill that would allow farmers to grow industrial hemp, an product that has essentially no THC, the active ingredient of pot.

Its also controversial because the bill, as proposed now, excludes anyone who has a prior pot conviction from participating in this industry.

Presumably, if someone convicted of a pot crime has served their time, they've paid their debut to society. But this bill would exclude these people.
Industrial hemp as in fabric, rope etc.

However the ban on felons participating is considered racist.

Critics point to the unintentional racial effect of such a ban. Given that the War on Drugs has disproportionately affected African Americans and communities of color, banning those with felony drug convictions may disproportionately shut-out these groups from the hemp industry. Industry leaders and activists, like Morris Beegle and Rick Trojan, point to the fact those convicted of a felony have already paid their debt to society, and this amendment is, quite simply, “terrible.”
EVERYTHING is racist, especially hemp rope.
 

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Proud American Patriot
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2,378 Posts
They problem they could have is people hiding marijuana in the hemp fields. That could be why they don't want former drug dealers and users involved.
This might be an excuse but it isn't a valid one. To get decent smoking pot it's necessary to get rid of the male plants before their flowers open, because once that happens the females go to seed, and all of the plant's energy goes to making seeds, which do not get you high, so the crop is either no good or not much good, and since the pollen came from the non-smoking varieties the seeds wouldn't be any good to plant. Pot grown right is called sinsemilla, which means seedless.

Commercial hemp grown for other purposes values the seeds. So it just would not be practical to have the two types growing anywhere close to each other. In fact a commercial field could lead to contamination of somebody else's hidden recreational crop somewhere else, if wind currents carried the pollen far enough.

Milton Friedman told us a long time ago that these laws would lead nowhere good. We should have listened to him. And by my reading of the 10th Amendment, the federal government never had the authority to outlaw this substance in the first place. States have the authority, but not the feds. But I guess the Constitution is barely worth the paper it's written on anymore.
 

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Dog Lives Matter
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6,145 Posts
I'm torn on this issue.

On one side, I don't see anything wrong with occasional recreational use. That's not much different than having a couple of beers on a Friday night.

On the other side, if anyone can smoke pot any time they wish and without restrictions, that is the best way to kill productivity that I can think of.

I have not messed with marijuana since the 1960s, but I had a couple of potheads working for me for a while. They did their jobs fine in the morning, but they partied every day at lunchtime and were completely worthless all afternoon. They were so useless and unintelligible that they were ****ing off the other people on their team.

There needs to be some type of restrictions, such as there are with alcohol. If someone is coming to work stoned, they need to be fired. Public intoxication should be handled the same for both. I see this as something that will eventually be protected by the Democrats.

Ask yourself if you want to be on the highway with Cheech and Chong in a car in oncoming traffic.

Do you want to work on a construction site with someone stoned running a crane with a pallet load of heavy materials swaying over your head?

Just as with alcohol, there are too many irresponsible people who will take this to extremes. Those people become dangerous to others around them.

How are issues like these handled in states that have legalized recreational use of marijuana?

What about kids? Is there an age restriction like there is with alcohol?

Forbes: Study Shows Heavy Adolescent Pot Use Permanently Lowers IQ

Science daily: Early marijuana use associated with abnormal brain function, lower IQ

We have legalized medical marijuana use in Arizona. On the first day the law went into effect, 130,000 people had applied for permits.

Ask any cop on the street about marijuana and they will tell you that 75% of marijuana they confiscate from kids is sold to them by people holding medical marijuana cards.
 

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Dios y Tejas
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6,660 Posts
OK having left the doper life behind when I was 15 or 16, It is my understanding that Hemp contains minimal amounts of THC and therefore your lungs would collapse before getting even a buzz on, much less a high. While Grass contains significant amounts of THC and will continue to be the go-to drug for dopers. Am I wrong? If not, WTH is the big deal on whether Hemp is legal or not? I am obviously missing something. Enlighten me please
 

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Registered
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OK having left the doper life behind when I was 15 or 16, It is my understanding that Hemp contains minimal amounts of THC and therefore your lungs would collapse before getting even a buzz on, much less a high. While Grass contains significant amounts of THC and will continue to be the go-to drug for dopers. Am I wrong? If not, WTH is the big deal on whether Hemp is legal or not? I am obviously missing something. Enlighten me please
Sure, no problem.

Hemp was banned in the U.S. because it was a threat and competitor to the movement towards large corporate interest. They couldn't beat hemp out of the market place, so they had it banned.

Hemp, while related to marijuana, isn't the same thing. Hemp being compared to marijuana was all corporate propaganda that many people fell for.

Comparing hemp to marijuana is as ridiculous as comparing: broccoli to cauliflower, turnips to radishes, bok choy to kale, brussels spouts to cabbage, or arugula or horseradish to any of my aforementioned crops; simply because all these plants are in the Brassica family.

Hemp was used since Antiquity in place of steel, wood, cotton, oil, food, medicine, plastic, etc.

Hemp was commonly used to make paper products; Henry Ford built a car that was made of almost all hemp and the car ran on hemp oil; clothing can be made from hemp; hemp has medicinal purposes and was often an ingredient in many of the old time home remedies, etc.

Hemp was one of our nation's cash crops until it was banned along with marijuana. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp on their plantations. Jefferson even referred to hemp as our nation's most important crop.

HTH
 

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Premium Member
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2,460 Posts
I feel complete liberty to use pot.

If it's truly liberty, I'm also free not to use pot.

I didn't care what anyone said when I used and it was illegal. I don't care what anyone says now that it's legal and I don't use.

Does every damned waking minute of your ****ing lives have to be guided by what the government says you can't and can do?

It's a wonder people are able to wipe their asses without first checking to make sure the government approves.
 

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Possum Lover
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15,309 Posts
Caffeine has me blocked, otherwise I would remind him they can forfeit your assets if they catch you using drugs. Good reason to say no. That's why my husband abstains. That and the contract with the pain doctor.

I did a survey online about 20 years ago. A poll. "If you could use pot, would you drink less?" 90% of them said yes, they would drink less. You can bet Big Alcohol has done that study and knows they will hemorrhage cash. For alcohol industry, it is literal survival - if pot comes to town they will be severely wounded.

I am sure even hemp makes them nervous.

That said, I believe pot will become legal, there is too much demand. My husband made the point that if Trump lets this happen it will be a certain reelection in 2020.
 
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