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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A few days ago I was walking along the creek that is the property line between my land and the timber company land. Not only does the timber company grow timber on their land, they also lease the land out to hunters. It is not unusual to see an influx of urban dwellers into rural areas starting a couple of months before hunting season. Most of the people who lease property in rural areas are good people. They just want to get out of the city, do some hunting, get a deer or hog and pass the tradition of hunting to the next generation.

With hunters there is an unspoken code of respect. You do not touch my trail cameras, stands and feeders and I do not touch yours.

Then there are the people who do not care about respect. They will knock your feeders and stands over and steal the trail cameras. These are the vandals and thieves that screw up life for everyone else. For people who visit their lease only a few times a year the vandals are not that big of an issue. All that gets screwed up is a few items such as the deer blind and feeders. For those of us who live in rural areas next to hunting leasing, the vandals can screw with us year round.


A few years ago a shed on the property was broke into. Some hand tools and a stihl chainsaw was stolen.

What concerns me about people scouting the property line is they may hear my chickens, see my crops, see fruit trees, see a shed and wonder whats in it,,, etc.

Let's say some kind of long term SHTF / TEOTWAWKI situation happens. Food starts to run short. I would would not put it past anyone to help themselves to some eggs, maybe take a chicken, figs, peaches,,, take whatever they can.

Even though I live in a rural area with just a few neighbors, I have to accept the reality there may be people out there who know the layout of my farm and I have no idea who they are.

I live here, but I provide a bug out location for friends and family members. Providing a safe harbor for those friends and family members is an important part of my overall long term SHTF survival plans. Every egg taken from my chicken house is an egg taken from my family.

Picture of the footprints.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Feed them some high velocity lead first
I was thinking of putting some no trespassing sings out with my phone number.

If they call we can meet, introduce ourselves, talk about safe directions to shoot for them.
 

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You said this is timber company land that is being leased, correct?

First, you need to take photogaphs and if you can get them on trail cam stills, print them. You can get information from the county clerk, but it may take a little work to find out what corp. owns the land so you'll need either a plat or physical/street address to find out. When you have the address of what corp. owns the land (Temple Inland is a big one in east Tx, for example) call and find out who manages the leased land.

Call that person as well as writing a letter and including photos of trespass. Make it clear that they have been onto your property, and that your property is posted, so they are trespassing illegally.

If the lessor tries to fluff you off, get ****ed and go over his head to whatever regional or division manager is next up the ladder. But hopefully the lessor/lease manager will contact whoever entered into the lease agreement with the timber company and tell them to keep their deer lease members off other people's land or face prosecution for trespass.

BTDT. That's the first step. Next step would be contacting the TPWD or see if you can find your local game warden and tell him what's going on. This is the time of year they start making their rounds of deer leases to 'visit' and check things out. He may be persuaded, especially if you have photographic proof that they are coming onto your property, to pay that lease a visit one Friday or Saturday evening, or a bright, early Sunday morning.

BTDT too.

Good luck, those are the two steps I took first. It took a while to curb the problem but it finally did. You don't want some idiot shooting into your property or shooting a deer on their side and pursuing it onto yours without your permission.
 

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I would print up some signs that say, "Private Property. Trespassers will be shot on sight". Don't hang them up yet, but if things ever get bad, hang them up along the river and all along the rest of the property boarder.

For now, try planting more trees, vines and shrubs in the woods to block the view between the river and your shed, chicken coop, house, etc. On the other side of the river bank, plant thorny bushes. Not just adjacent to your property, but further up and down the river bank in both directions.
 

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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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You have to accept that you prob/have been scouted already.I dont know your routine or how much time you can spend in interdiction efforts but could you check into watching where the land users park so you would know when someone "is out there" and intercept them?Maybe put private property signs along the creek.Most folks like that ignore No Tresspassing signs but Private Property along a defined boundry(creek) seems to get their attention better...some you may just have to meet up with while armed to get their attention
 

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I would print up some signs that say, "Private Property. Trespassers will be shot on sight". Don't hang them up yet, but if things ever get bad, hang them up along the river and all along the rest of the property boarder.

For now, try planting more trees, vines and shrubs in the woods to block the view between the river and your shed, chicken coop, house, etc. On the other side of the river bank, plant thorny bushes. Not just adjacent to your property, but further up and down the river bank in both directions.
Definitely. Time to get help from nature.

Hawthorn, blackberry, raspberry, gooseberry, limeberry, kei apple, natal plum, goji berry, jujube, prickly pear, and nettles all do a good job at both barrier protection and food production.

Osage can be woven with time to create a truly sturdy barrier that is sharp and strong, plus the wood is awesome for tool handle and bow production.

Bamboo can be grown to being almost impenetrable, and becomes a very renewable building material source.

Certain holly bushes are both a decent barrier and a potent caffeine source.

A nice mixed hedge of these plants at the top of the river bank would be difficult to surmount from soft river bank ground from below.

If you want some trees to mix in then the honey locust is a perfect choice. A dense hardwood that makes lovely lumber, is hard to kill once started and tolerates a variety of difficult soil areas, has a minor food production ability from the pulp inside their seed pods, and those thorns! Those thorns are like nails. No fooling, you could use those thorns to nail soft woods if you had to. As supports and anchors for a hedge system they are truly formidable.

A spiny hedge is on duty 24 hours a day and doesn't put you at liability for making traps.

As for the other side of the river you might try your hand at some guerrilla gardening with poison oak, ivy, or sumac so that people on the other side decide that one trip down to the creek is enough entertainment. Or try Pyracantha, or firethorn for their side of the creek. A scratch and rub from the thorns will ruin your whole week, but the blossoms and mini-berries are lovely and wildly popular with honey bees and birds. Add an apiary to your home program and your neighbors will see that creek as a nasty mix of stingers, thorns, and burning plants, while you know how to navigate it.
 

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"As for the other side of the river you might try your hand at some guerrilla gardening with poison oak, ivy, or sumac so that people on the other side decide that one trip down to the creek is enough entertainment. Or try Pyracantha, or firethorn for their side of the creek. A scratch and rub from the thorns will ruin your whole week, but the blossoms and mini-berries are lovely and wildly popular with honey bees and birds. Add an apiary to your home program and your neighbors will see that creek as a nasty mix of stingers, thorns, and burning plants, while you know how to navigate it."

I like the way you think👍😎
 

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Kev, you brought up a very important issue with this.
At least until the gasoline runs out, rural does not necessarily mean private or protected.
A friend of mine lives out in the countryside, with homes separated by several acres of wild land. Some enterprising crooks took it upon themselves to drive up the country road, home to home, and just fill their truck with whatever they could get away with. Chainsaws, tool boxes, fishing and camping gear, all went missing. If they went to a property with a barking dog they just moved on. Easy pickings.

In SHTF it's a surety that desperate city dwellers will flow out into the countryside, eating and taking whatever they can. Everyone remember the Argentina guy who became popular several years back with his stories of surviving their economic collapse? Here's his experience of those in the country:

After all these years I learned that even though the person that lives out in the country is safer when it comes to small time robberies, that same person is more exposed to extremely violent home robberies. Criminals know that they are isolated and their feeling of invulnerability is boosted. When they assault a country home or farm, they will usually stay there for hours or days torturing the owners. I heard it all: women and children getting raped, people tied to the beds and tortured with electricity, beatings, burned with acetylene torches. Big cities aren’t much safer for the survivalist that decides to stay in the city. He will have to face express kidnappings, robberies, and pretty much risking getting shot for what’s in his pockets or even his clothes.

That said, I still think living in the country is better and more secure. Cities even now are a gong show.
 

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:

After all these years I learned that even though the person that lives out in the country is safer when it comes to small time robberies, that same person is more exposed to extremely violent home robberies. Criminals know that they are isolated and their feeling of invulnerability is boosted. When they assault a country home or farm, they will usually stay there for hours or days torturing the owners. I heard it all: women and children getting raped, people tied to the beds and tortured with electricity, beatings, burned with acetylene torches. Big cities aren’t much safer for the survivalist that decides to stay in the city. He will have to face express kidnappings, robberies, and pretty much risking getting shot for what’s in his pockets or even his clothes.

That said, I still think living in the country is better and more secure. Cities even now are a gong show.

More people need to carry at home.

I hear everyone coming (1/2 mile driveway) and typically walk outside to see who it is. (Has yet to be someone not intending to get here) but I suspect the Glock 23 on my hip would help to keep things civil.
 

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Agreed, in addition to situational awareness around the home.
An easily workable communications system with others, security systems and selecting a quality man's-best-friend are also imperative.
 

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I've been considering buying some remote property to build a cabin as sort of a vacation/ bug out location. The concern of theft has caused me to have second thoughts.
 

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More people need to carry at home.

I hear everyone coming (1/2 mile driveway) and typically walk outside to see who it is. (Has yet to be someone not intending to get here) but I suspect the Glock 23 on my hip would help to keep things civil.
Agreed, I work at home (IT project manager for a government contractor). It's a rural, safe, quiet area. Still, my routine in the AM is to send the wife off to work, put my son on the school bus, strap on my p226, and get crackin'. The dog alerts me if someone comes down my long driveway....and believe me, I go check to see who it is.
 

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You could post some official looking toxic waste/bio hazard signs on your property line. Just let the game wardens know they are BS
Living near an Army post, I've seen stupid people ignore signs all the time, even with the MPs and game wardens patrolling the area. Best one was a guy (civilian) who decided to go 4-wheeling one night and got his brand new Jeep stuck in the mud in an artillery range impact area. With unexploded ordnance in the ground everywhere, no one would even try to get it out of there. It did make an excellent target though...while it lasted.

Another idiot (civilian) decided to go after a huge buck that hung out near a helicopter airfield in a posted "no hunting" zone. One night he got all cammo'd up and went crawling into the area with his bow, looking for that buck. The one mistake he made was forgetting that every one of those helos flying in and out of that airport had FLIR, and he was lit up bright as day. A quick radio call to the MPs brought an end to his hunting trip and some serious Federal charges.

I've often thought about posting my own place with signs that read: "This Property Protected by a Guy With a .308 and a Backhoe. Trespass At Your Own Risk".
 

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my routine in the AM is to send the wife off to work, put my son on the school bus, strap on my p226, and get crackin'.
That's a sexy awesome lifestyle. Can we trade?
 

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Kev, you brought up a very important issue with this.
At least until the gasoline runs out, rural does not necessarily mean private or protected.
A friend of mine lives out in the countryside, with homes separated by several acres of wild land. Some enterprising crooks took it upon themselves to drive up the country road, home to home, and just fill their truck with whatever they could get away with. Chainsaws, tool boxes, fishing and camping gear, all went missing. If they went to a property with a barking dog they just moved on. Easy pickings.

In SHTF it's a surety that desperate city dwellers will flow out into the countryside, eating and taking whatever they can. Everyone remember the Argentina guy who became popular several years back with his stories of surviving their economic collapse? Here's his experience of those in the country:

After all these years I learned that even though the person that lives out in the country is safer when it comes to small time robberies, that same person is more exposed to extremely violent home robberies. Criminals know that they are isolated and their feeling of invulnerability is boosted. When they assault a country home or farm, they will usually stay there for hours or days torturing the owners. I heard it all: women and children getting raped, people tied to the beds and tortured with electricity, beatings, burned with acetylene torches. Big cities aren’t much safer for the survivalist that decides to stay in the city. He will have to face express kidnappings, robberies, and pretty much risking getting shot for what’s in his pockets or even his clothes.

That said, I still think living in the country is better and more secure. Cities even now are a gong show.
He lived in a much smaller country than the US. The Rural areas there were significantly closer to the cities than ours are.

In the US, you have city, then miles and miles and miles of Suburbs. THEN you have miles and miles and miles and miles of commercial farming. THEN you have small towns and rural areas.

In Argentina, you have small cities (Compared to the US), almost non existent suburbs, and then right into rural areas. It's not as hard to get to the victims there.

Also, in the US the majority of rural places are armed to the teeth and then some. I really don't think Argentina was like that. Down there, it was easy pickings. In the US, criminal gangs like that will mysteriously "go missing", without a trace of what happened to them.
 
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