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Where I live sassafras does not grow wild, nor does sweet birch or spice wood. I did a trip a few years ago and got some bushes of each and planted them in a similar habitat to what they had in their natural home and now I have some nice standings of each of these. While wild leeks (ramps) grow here I didn't have any on my land so I dug some up and planted them down at the edge of the swamp. I've got a pretty good stand right now but it will be a couple more years before I begin harvesting them. I cut down all the lilac bushes around my house and planted elderberry in it's place so I didn't have to go so far to collect for my medicinals and berries for pies and wine.

I was thinking of trying wild rice in the ponds created by trillium creek. With the running shallow water emptying into the ponds it may be the perfect place for it to grow.

Does anyone else transplant wild edibles for survival purposes? What kind and where? Thanks

Tury
 

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you could be asking for trouble in a lot of ways. there are laws against transporting plants especially out of their native areas. plants and animals live in a specific area for a reason, if they become dominate they could push out something else you might want.
 

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I have transplanted many wilds to my yard and done away with grass. Since all of them are native there is no legal issue with what I moved. The odd thing about the elderberries is they move, about a foot a year, to the north. Of course the real issue is I am the only one without decapitated grass for a front yard and that has caused some legal issues which I have won so far. Unlike my neighbors I use no pesticides (not contaminating the water supply) nor have to water (conserving resources) and I have food and a lot of birds et cetera. The yard of the past and the future. The list of weeds in my yard would be long.... drymaria, sonchus, lactuca, stellaria, oxalis, plantago, tradescantia, commelina, sambuca, taraxacum, monarda, momordica, digitaria, opuntia, melothria plus standard Florida stuff like bananas and fruit trees. Then again, that is what my website is all about. Click on my blog.
 

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I transplant many wild edibles to places I can get to them easily. I have brought up sassafras too, just because I love to make root beer. Indians have done this for ages and many of what we think of now as natural plants in a certain area were actually brought in by Indians. It makes sense to do it just to make life easier to get the wild leeks out the back door instead of walking all the way out the the wild patch. Then there is seldom a meal I cook that doesn't have wild edibles in it so I like an easy to get to source.

Gillian
 

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so I didn't have to go so far to collect for my medicinals and berries for pies and wine.
And this way if the bullets ever start flying you won't have to go far from the house...

Does anyone else transplant wild edibles for survival purposes? What kind and where?
Absolutely. In my mind it is the perfect extension of gardening...

I've dug up Chickweed before from the garden & moved it into the sunroom in January where it takes off strong. I don't nornally eat this, but after TEOTWAWKI it I will be doing it consistently. Adding vitamins & minerals to the rice & beans...

Also have transplanted Raspberries, Blackberries & Jerusalem Artichokes in & around the garden. All these grow wild here in SW Missouri, but were not on my property in abundance when we built our house.
 
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