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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do not know if this is the proper place to post so please move if necessary.

Survivalists like our selves generally carry a bit more gear everyday than the average person. So, how many of you have tried exercising in what you normally wear everyday with the gear you carry everyday? I do not mean anything in regards to a full strenuous workout, but more along the lines of testing mobility and your stamina while carrying your usual stuff.

I have practiced sprinting and sustaining a jog to see how easy I can do it with my EDC gear. You can do this while walking your dog to avoid some weird looks. I have also practiced jumping fences and tried climbing to test the flexibility of my normal clothing. Doing these exercises have taught me a lot about removing excess weight and maintaining retention of important items like my wallet while moving quickly.

The reason I am bringing this topic up is because when the SHTF you’re probably not going to be wearing your 5.11 tuxedo or track suit at the grocery store or wherever you may be (At least I hope you’re not wearing that). Think of a situation like the Los Angeles riots in which you might need to haul *** in order to get to safety or reach your vehicle.

Have you tested your EDC system in the likely chance you might need to seriously move?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Does cyclocross trainging count for being shtf shape?
I had to look up cyclocross and it looks pretty interesting. If you do that you are probably in better shape than most of the urban population. It looks like it would help you out if you had to carry something like a BOB as well.

From my OP I am asking more along the lines of how one’s mobility is with their EDC, and not particularly if there in shape. Though, being in shape would help tremendously during a SHTF scenario.

I made this post because I found out what I used to carry was comfortable while walking or sitting around, but impeded my mobility when I had to move quickly. Because of this I downsized my pocket knife and flashlight. I know there are some people who carry loads of stuff, which is perfectly fine if they like it. However, in some situations it may be better to move than stand one’s ground.
 

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I'm a great big fan of your question! All of my gear, EDC and INCH, have been tested in a variety of extreme situations, as have all of my weapon choices. And the testing has modified my choices ... as is expected.
 

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Demon of the Midwest
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My work is exercising, Im in construction mostly HVAC but I do it all. I carry my revolver on the front of my right hip. I bend and flex all day and only occasionally need to re adjust for comfort. but for most of the day it all sits fine. The wallet gets irritating if I'm sweating good, but I just throw it in the truck if it does.bugs me.

As for using it in a fight, I train shooting from concealed in different ways, on my back, seated, ect. I also train drawing and shooting from my vehicle a lot to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The wallet issue was something I was struggling with. It seems like it would be a simple task to remove some weight and bulk in that area, but women love a guy with a big… wallet.
 

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I get the distinct impression that for many, preparedness = owning things. Thank you for reminding us that its probably a good idea to actually test them out before the crisis hits that we're preparing for that drove us to buy them in the first place.
 

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Mobility is of great importance to me. When you live in your usual environment and conditions change little day to day it is easy to get carried away and buy just more and more stuff. I think about this topic alot. I know how big my bag that i carry daily is, and if i put one item inside another might not fit in or make it too heavy to be practical to go a long distance on foot or by bicycle. I think long hikes are especially useful for seeing what is useful and what isn't. For example, once when on a two day hike, i really wondered how someone would feel about carrying a large rifle on top of the bag that already eats into ones shoulders with only clothes, food and water, and some other small objects.

I was watching a TV show the other day where a guy from our military (not US) mentioned that you should never have more than 22 pounds on you (our country has a lot of hills and mountains, he was referring to weight that would be carried by people in excellent physical shape). While it is true that you could discard extra objects along the way, you will probably be only tempted to do so after you are exhausted, caught in bad weather conditions and/or injured. More so if the items were expensive to start with. Why not just avoid the hassle and keep a limit on bag weight as a part of preparedness and have the amount of energy and strength left that you would use up carrying items you know you will not need in 99%, and when you do need them it will only be an inconvenience, not a life or death situation? Im thinking large books and luxuries of the like.

I said it before, a SHTF situation would be one where your gear will not be the center of your attention, so good gear, but gear that you can actually find and assemble in a short amount of time is essential. A pile of expensive stuff that is not organized has the same value as a pile of trash, since both will be useless if you either cant take it with you or don't know where it is.

Also some people that usually carry little with them are travelers. If you see a traveler with a huge bag, you can know right away that he did not come very far or only traveled in luxurious ways.

Apart from that i think i read somewhere about a Buddhist monk replying on how to determine which possessions he keeps (since they all have very little and are not allowed to have gold or money). He said something along the lines "If you carry something for 10 miles by foot you know exactly whether to keep it or not".
 

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I think many people on here are hunters. Now depending on how you hunt, that can be the perfect situation to practice.

Depending on what I'm doing, I've sometimes chosen to "overpack" and pack for a few days of survival. Not a bad idea if I'm in a new area, alone, with bad weather (potential to get lost). Hiking around in heavy gear (cold winter hunting at high elevation) with your rifle and pack really tests your abilities.
My elk hunting gear is very similar to my BOB gear, mainly just a different rifle. So its a great way to discover what's really important, and what's dead weight.
 

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Cyclocross is 30-60 min of pure pain! Actually, that is probably a good sport for preparing for an urban escape via bike. I have my old cyclocross bike fitted up with some slightly larger tires and will carry it in my Ex when I get it finished. It is a great approach to getting out of town and moving at speed across any terrain. A 29'er MTB with thin tires might be better depending on the area.

As to the original question, this brings up the issue of training specificity. When I was racing regularly and coaching other racers, we tried to focus on doing that level of effort that would be required in competition. The idea of training/practicing with your daily gear is important. Not just exercise, but effective use of tools, weapons, and supplies.
 

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I do not know if this is the proper place to post so please move if necessary.

Survivalists like our selves generally carry a bit more gear everyday than the average person. So, how many of you have tried exercising in what you normally wear everyday with the gear you carry everyday? I do not mean anything in regards to a full strenuous workout, but more along the lines of testing mobility and your stamina while carrying your usual stuff.

I have practiced sprinting and sustaining a jog to see how easy I can do it with my EDC gear. You can do this while walking your dog to avoid some weird looks. I have also practiced jumping fences and tried climbing to test the flexibility of my normal clothing. Doing these exercises have taught me a lot about removing excess weight and maintaining retention of important items like my wallet while moving quickly.

The reason I am bringing this topic up is because when the SHTF you’re probably not going to be wearing your 5.11 tuxedo or track suit at the grocery store or wherever you may be (At least I hope you’re not wearing that). Think of a situation like the Los Angeles riots in which you might need to haul *** in order to get to safety or reach your vehicle.

Have you tested your EDC system in the likely chance you might need to seriously move?
My EDC is light. A concealed glock 21 with two extra mags, small zippered pouch of first aid/misc supplies, lighter, 5" folding blade north of the extra mags but on the outside of the belt, 3 or 5 watt really bright LED flashlight. It's easier to hide b/c I work in a suit or sports jacket at the office but if it weren't for that the flashlight would be bulky in my front pocket and the only thing really noticeable.

So really, I can do all of the physical requirements stuff with my Every Day Carry that I can do as if I weren't carrying.
 

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a EDC shouldn't be much. Mine consists of a 10-20 pound backpack i use every day (varies depending on what i am using it...school, work, exercising, etc). I chose my backpack because it isn't restricting, lightweight, and very roomy.

Unless you're in the marines or just feel safe packing a m82 on your back it should be lightweight.

My EDC bag came to fruition when i went to the amazon and the flight had a very strict weight requirements. it basically became a bare bones camping bag that didn't leave much latitude for convenient items. Walking around for 8-12 hours a day would wear you out after repeated occurrences, so the heaviest things in the bag was the water. Like the guy with the Buddhist monk comment, you really learn what you want to have after a nice long walk
 

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Im a cat3 cross and road racer. I carry a edc pack with me to work via foot,skateboard, or my bike. I have a trail thats five miles long twenty min walk from my place. I use it for hiking. I go camping mostly in fhe winter when the shop slows down. Almost all of my fitness comes from my training though.four-five days a week on the bike and core/strength trainngg the otherdays. Im pretty comfortable with my hr at 175 either on my bike or carrying my packs.
 

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What would Mal do
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ok.. I'll jump in with a different perspective... I'm edging up on 55 yrs old..and the cardio is more and more of a battle as each year passes regardless of what I do.
I own a biz that requires a lot of physical..heavy lifting, long days on my feet, up and down steps, outdoors in the heat a lot, etc...most of the time I'm hanging in there with guys half my age but that doesn't mean I'm ready to strap on my 45lb big BOB and go jogging through the woods.

I actually have both that larger BOB and a small EDC grab bag.

the large BOB is more designed for that quick grab in the middle of the night if I wake up to a house fire or the nuke plant siren goes off, etc. I only need to get that bag down the steps and tossed into the truck and leave.

my EDC bag is more reasonable and more of a get home bag or a rush to the hospital to sit in the lobby bag.
minimal clothes, toiletries, etc. and that EDC bag relies on me already having my small pistol and spare mag on my person, knife, etc..so only a couple spare mags of 380 on the small bag compared to what's in the BOB.

I have a mountain bike/hybrid that I enjoy on the trails on my property and when we go camping in the mountains...but I wouldn't want to either hike an aggressive 10 miles nor ride my bike all afternoon with a 45lb pack on my back...and no.. I don't practice that either.
When I do ride, I usually do have a backpack on me that is comparable to my EDC

so for you young studs...you make an excellent point..being in shape can be a huge issue for bugging out.
my wife, for example can not begin to keep up with me, doesn't ride a bike and I'd have to abandon any bug out action beyond a walk pace with stops along the way if it were in the hills...
 

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I can't say I've specifically tested my EDC setup, but what I wear for some other activities is not terribly far from my daily setup. Well, except for the ar15, body armor, 210 rounds of 5.56, water bladder, med kit, radio, well, you get the idea.

That said when using the above, I have found the same things the OP has regarding keeping bulk down, retention of important items, and trying to maintain physical flexibility. Nothing sucks worse than having to take a knee and finding out that you left some sort of object in your thigh cargo pocket such as a keychain full of keys...
 
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