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I think a bug-out bag or get-home-bag should be relatively light. For example 30 pounds for an average healthy adult man, and less for most women and children.

There are government regulations for maximum carrying weight, to prevent chronic damage to the spine. These regulations can be found on the websites of NIOSH, OSHA, CDC, etc.

There is a big difference between the weight that you are allowed to wear incidentally for short periods of time, and the weight that you are allowed to wear for days.

During evacuation you could add a second bag in a small cart. Or you could use a bicycle to carry some extra weight.

That means you need the equipment used for ultra-light backpack camping, including an ultra-light tent and sleeping bag in a cold climate, plus a small survival kit and a small folding saw.

Then there is no weight capacity left for extras, such as a monocular, radio transceiver, playing cards, climbing rope, axe, handcuffs, camp shovel, bulletproof vest, heavy tools, child toys, etc.

It is important to train to camp regularly for a few days with just your bug-out bag, in all types of weather.

This can be done on a terrace in a garden, or on a balcony, or in an open car garage, if you want to protect yourself against dangerous tick bites. Or it can be done in winter in an unheated attic, with the windows open.

You can train in long-distance walking, while carrying the weight on your back. For this you can use an old backpack, filled with cheap and faulty material.

This way you can keep your high quality emergency equipment undamaged for a real disaster. Moreover there is no risk of your real bug-out bag being incomplete, if you need it for a real emergency.
 

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For pack weight, about one-third of your body weight is a good general guide. Preferably less. You can carry more but it will injure or tire you.
Some of the Brit soldiers in the Falklands War carried ridiculous weights overland. But they were fit and highly trained (and, I think, pretty tired afterwards).
Heavy boots also tire you out. Lightweight is better but reliability is the number one consideration.

Using belt order, webbing or vests can help spread the load so you can have a smaller pack.
 

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I think a bug-out bag or get-home-bag should be relatively light. For example 30 pounds for an average healthy adult man, and less for most women and children.
Great.

I think you may be missing the point of a bugout bag though and likewise a get home bag.

Here is the thing you probably havn't considered but probably should consider.

It needs to do its job. Having survival bags is about keeping you alive, generally life comes before injury, so if you get injured as a result of saving your life it is generally viewed as better than not saving your life.

Hopefully you are putting together a bug out bag with a bug out location in mind. Some type of plan you've put together. From that plan you should be able to put together what you need to execute that plan. Some bug out plans may be much easier going to get to than others. The weight of your bag should be dependant upon what the unique needs are based upon the given bugout you will be undertaking with the bag. Key considerations are how long will it take you to get there, and what envrionment are you in while getting there.

The same general principles can be applied to a get home bag but generally speaking a bug out bag is for when you need to leave your primary domicile while a get home bag is generally due to a breakdown of regular transportation methods that got you from your home in the first place and there being no viable alternatives other than going on foot. However the range of a GHB may vary, generally a GHB deals with shorter distances and thus timeframes but may have more extreme environments as generally a bug out should happen before things go bad while a GHB may be required when there is a sudden unexpected event. BOBS can also plan for an unexpected event but imo normally these situations will require bugging in because it is not practicle to be mobile while most scenarios requiring a bugout are active.















Then there is no weight capacity left for extras, such as a monocular, radio transceiver, playing cards, climbing rope, axe, handcuffs, camp shovel, bulletproof vest, heavy tools, child toys, etc.
While I don't totally agree, I do think that you should stick to essentials. If you are bugging out with children a toy may actually do a lot to keep your child funcitoning enough to keep them mobile.


It is important to train to camp regularly for a few days with just your bug-out bag, in all types of weather.
I don't totally agree with this either. Once you have done it is more of the same. There is a point when there really isn't a reason to train but rather you want to go out and do it, because you arn't going to be learning anything new once you get the basics down. What would matter though is being in different enviornments, differnt seaons, different terrains. It isn't just weather though, that is the imprtant take away, it is location. Sleeping in a swamp is not the same as sleeping in a forest is not the same as sleeping in a snow field is not the same as sleeping in a cold storage unit, is not the same as sleeping in an attic in summer. Every location is going to be a little different. Weather imo isn't as important as how that weather effects your sleeping conditions or ability to sleep. Weather itself is all solved by the same thing, good clothing and footwear.



This way you can keep your high quality emergency equipment undamaged for a real disaster. Moreover there is no risk of your real bug-out bag being incomplete, if you need it for a real emergency.
Train with what you use. You don't want to keep something in a wrapper only to find out it doesn't perrform the way you thought it would in the field.



None the less at the end of the day it comes down to essentials. Food water, clothing.

Everything else is operational.


Cost can be a concern... however generally speaking most essential kit is not expended when used.

Costs may end up going up when trade with china is ruined more. Get what you can. Its a money thing not a best practice thing. As the years roll by, small things here and there can add up... but if you don't actually try it in the field, you may be suprised when you try it. I'd instead suggest get two of anything that is going to be expended... test it out and keep the other for use in emergency.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
For pack weight, about one-third of your body weight is a good general guide.
I think that is too heavy for most people, to carry safely for days. And that rule of one-third does certainly not apply if you are overweight.
 

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Having survival bags is about keeping you alive, generally life comes before injury, so if you get injured as a result of saving your life it is generally viewed as better than not saving your life.
Bugging out on foot with a spinal injury sounds to me like a recipe for failure, hurting yourself and your familiy.
 

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Bugging out on foot with a spinal injury sounds to me like a recipe for failure, hurting yourself and your familiy.
I think you are missing the point again.

Being a lazy person who isn't willing to train enough with weight to handle the weight comfortably then trying to save their ego by making up nonsense about someone carrying a bag once to escape death permanently debilitating them is not a selling point of your postion.

I can jog 20 miles with a 30lb pack, you know what the same is largely true for a 31lbs pack too.

You had standard loads being well in excess of that people arn't walking around with walkers and canes now either.

Obviously you only want to carry what you need to but 30lbs is damn light. Obviously you need to get use to those weights however a healthy person should have no issue carrying a 60lb backpack that is properly adjusted and supported by the HIPS.

The fact you are citing spinal damage says to me you don't even know how to properly wear a backpack.

The other issue is you need a backpack capable of carrying the weight appropirately.

I recently ran into this issue with my ozark trail backpack vs. military rucksacks. The ozark trail stictiching was being stressed with 35L of water in the bag that is about 80lbs or so. Was it able to be walked with comfortably, yes, did I trust the backpack and would I want to walk long distance with it no. It is rated a 46L bag but I would trust the bag to hold 46L of water and hike with it. I would trust my ACU rucksack with that weight because the weight wears much better with that bags load distribution strapping.

Much the same as my custom chest harnessess for my ruck sacks, they transfer weight off the shoulders and put it into the core. The load bareing system matters far more than the weight itself.

Again I am thinking you are inexperienced and really don't know what you are talking about from what you are saying.

None the less, you are entited to your opinion.

None the less a bug out should involve mapping out travel and resupply points so you should be able to leverage weight for a variety of resupply points, but you still need to cover essentials. For instance if you have locations for spring water you may not need to carry as much water. Forr food if you have food and water storers prepositioned you don't need to take that with you.

Its just nonsensical to say I won't carry as much cause I don't want to get hurt to save my life.

People who are fit wouldn't even bother making a post like yours.

The problem is overtrainng and repetitive stress. Occupationally is not the same as that one time you need to carry a bag to save your life situation. What you arn't getting is that occupational stanards are there to prevent regular use injuries. While you may train weekly with hiking etc.. its not something you should be doing daily anyway. A bugout etc.. is suppose to be a short duration event. If your bugout takes you across the country I think you may be setting your bar a little high on a reasonable bugout where you travel quickly over as short a distance as is possible to escape whatever emergeny situation requires you to escape your home.

I think you are making this more but I get the sense you just are very weak and not even approaching bad health.

Frankly I am not super healthy and I have no issues handling weights in excess of what you are rercommending. Frankly the problem is people are pathetically weak and lazy these days. They are in horrible health, the exact same reason people are keeling from things like covid. They just arer unhealthy.


I do agree though most people shouldn't need a bag in excess of 30lbs for a bugout. It is better to travel lighter. The issue however is saying this is due to risk of injury.. it really isn't it is due to efficiency. While there is a risk frankly the issues start cropping up above 60lbs... they can happen lower but if you are in the gym commonly working loads in excess of 200lbs for hours.. 60lbs of stress on a back you are doing exercises in excess of 400lbs of extensions on isn't very stressing.

As with other fitness activities, it is about doing it with the proper form and using the property equipment.
 

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How many people over or under fifty in the US could walk a mile with a thirty pound pack? I haven't seen many. How many people in the US buy riding mowers because pushing one for an hour is beyond them?
If you maintain a good fitness regime and eat sensibly, you'll increase your capabilities, but even better you'll be much healthier. It's a win, win scenario.
 

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How many people over or under fifty in the US could walk a mile with a thirty pound pack? I haven't seen many. How many people in the US buy riding mowers because pushing one for an hour is beyond them?
If you maintain a good fitness regime and eat sensibly, you'll increase your capabilities, but even better you'll be much healthier. It's a win, win scenario.
I think most people under 60 can walk a mile with 30 pounds.

The really silly thing about the GHB/BOB weight threads that continually pop up is that who is planning on walking ? I mean Walking is always plan B or C for me. And I am pretty sure I can take things OUT of my pack if I have a 30 mile walk and want to lighten the load.

Should you have heavy coat in your GHB ? Maybe. Can you leave that coat in the car if it’s 99 degrees outside and save the weight , yes.

If you can walk a 1/4 mile with 30 pounds you can walk a mile
Or even 10 miles. It just may take a while.

I workout and walking is a little as part of my workout ( treadmill inclined most of the time ) to keep in BO shape a little.

But I don’t plan to walk Very far when SHTF unless my other plans fail.
 

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If for example I wanted a bug out bag in case of say a bushfire. By the time I packed overalls, boots gloves, mask and goggles I would probably be over the 30lb limit.

But that isn't to get me miles on foot. That is to get me to shelter.

Bug out bags are very generic and so one size doesn't fit all.

I tend to go heavy with bug out bags. But I also plan to not have to go very far with them.
 

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The really silly thing about the GHB/BOB weight threads that continually pop up is that who is planning on walking ? I mean Walking is always plan B or C for me. And I am pretty sure I can take things OUT of my pack if I have a 30 mile walk and want to lighten the load.
The idea got really popular as 'the thing' that defined a prepper at some point and everyone jumped on it.....I'm not sure everyone really thought it through all the way. There is a reason we don't talk about them very much anymore. Most people who thought about it very long realized that bugging out meant bugging out somewhere better than you started, through something so terrible that you had to leave your home and everything you had..and once you think about that very long most people see that they really don't have any place to go and decide to pour more effort into bugging in....and so the BOBs turned more into GHBs and INCHs.

Of course the BOB concept is not totally invalid but it has to be more than just "general stuff I run for my life with" and more...."My safe house is fifty miles up the side of this hill and this is what I need to get there with if the roads are blocked.

And once you get to THAT point a specific weight limit is less of a thing and its more like what you need for the mission.
 

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Ask anyone that has spent any extended period of time with a plate carrier on as part of their vocation.

I know men that are strong as an ox in every part of their body but the connective tissue in their lower back or c-spine is gone

Yes, a heavy BOB will destroy you especially if you're training with it, not to mention cause you to burn massive amounts of extras calories
 

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BOB ang GHB are totally different though in the scenarios I would expect to need them. I would expect for my family and I to be using a vehicle Of some type in most BOB situations and be on foot in most GHB situations. As mentioned above the GHB can be evaluated at the time of need and resources increases or decreased based on distance and climate.

I have items in my vehicle that are not in the bag that may be added. I also have items in the bag that may be removed
 

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Bugging out on foot with a spinal injury sounds to me like a recipe for failure, hurting yourself and your familiy.
I think you are missing the point again.

Being a lazy person who isn't willing to train enough with weight to handle the weight comfortably then trying to save their ego by making up nonsense about someone carrying a bag once to escape death permanently debilitating them is not a selling point of your postion.

I can jog 20 miles with a 30lb pack, you know what the same is largely true for a 31lbs pack too.

You had standard loads being well in excess of that people arn't walking around with walkers and canes now either.

Obviously you only want to carry what you need to but 30lbs is damn light. Obviously you need to get use to those weights however a healthy person should have no issue carrying a 60lb backpack that is properly adjusted and supported by the HIPS.

The fact you are citing spinal damage says to me you don't even know how to properly wear a backpack.

The other issue is you need a backpack capable of carrying the weight appropirately.

I recently ran into this issue with my ozark trail backpack vs. military rucksacks. The ozark trail stictiching was being stressed with 35L of water in the bag that is about 80lbs or so. Was it able to be walked with comfortably, yes, did I trust the backpack and would I want to walk long distance with it no. It is rated a 46L bag but I would trust the bag to hold 46L of water and hike with it. I would trust my ACU rucksack with that weight because the weight wears much better with that bags load distribution strapping.

Much the same as my custom chest harnessess for my ruck sacks, they transfer weight off the shoulders and put it into the core. The load bareing system matters far more than the weight itself.

Again I am thinking you are inexperienced and really don't know what you are talking about from what you are saying.

None the less, you are entited to your opinion.

None the less a bug out should involve mapping out travel and resupply points so you should be able to leverage weight for a variety of resupply points, but you still need to cover essentials. For instance if you have locations for spring water you may not need to carry as much water. Forr food if you have food and water storers prepositioned you don't need to take that with you.

Its just nonsensical to say I won't carry as much cause I don't want to get hurt to save my life.

People who are fit wouldn't even bother making a post like yours.

The problem is overtrainng and repetitive stress. Occupationally is not the same as that one time you need to carry a bag to save your life situation. What you arn't getting is that occupational stanards are there to prevent regular use injuries. While you may train weekly with hiking etc.. its not something you should be doing daily anyway. A bugout etc.. is suppose to be a short duration event. If your bugout takes you across the country I think you may be setting your bar a little high on a reasonable bugout where you travel quickly over as short a distance as is possible to escape whatever emergeny situation requires you to escape your home.

I think you are making this more but I get the sense you just are very weak and not even approaching bad health.

Frankly I am not super healthy and I have no issues handling weights in excess of what you are rercommending. Frankly the problem is people are pathetically weak and lazy these days. They are in horrible health, the exact same reason people are keeling from things like covid. They just arer unhealthy.


I do agree though most people shouldn't need a bag in excess of 30lbs for a bugout. It is better to travel lighter. The issue however is saying this is due to risk of injury.. it really isn't it is due to efficiency. While there is a risk frankly the issues start cropping up above 60lbs... they can happen lower but if you are in the gym commonly working loads in excess of 200lbs for hours.. 60lbs of stress on a back you are doing exercises in excess of 400lbs of extensions on isn't very stressing.

As with other fitness activities, it is about doing it with the proper form and using the property equipment.
Well if you can jog a distance equal to the length of your post then you have nothing to worry about
 

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Tell that to the military. I carried 100 lb packs many miles with no ill effects. That was almost 2/3s my body weight. Im 63 and still carry a 50 lb pack in the bush.Ibush.I dont run like Mr Ashley though.
 

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I agree with the 30 pound rule, but I also need you to tell my company commander about the back damage with heavier packs. Lol. Last time I did a ruck I weighed my pack in at 52 pounds. It was super heavy, super sucked, and I was super slow.

35-40 is probably about max poundage for most people who don't ruck often, and even that will suck pretty dang bad.
 

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Choose your gear based on the mission, then find a way to carry or cache it.
Limiting your gear to 30 lbs does not make sense if you need to carry a winter tent and bag, or a weeks worth of food and water.
If you are looking to assemble a bag with no real shelter, no food, and no water, I don't believe I can help you much.
 
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