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Observer
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Survival situations require shelter as one of the big THREE!

Shelter is not always easy to come by especially after being forced to hike into the darkness. Would a useful bug out/ survival kit piece be an ultralite tent?

All those who may say that it is easier to whack up a quick tarp shelter may be 100% correct but tents offer more in some cases such as windproofing and insulation on top of that of your sleeping bag.

What do you think??
 

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Retrofitted Sheeple
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Well like everything else, there are trade-offs. I really wanted(and still do) an ultralight tent, but a decent one is extremely expensive. Whereas a siltarp is even lighter, packs even smaller and costs considerably less for a decent one. But it's somewhat less effective. Still, It's amazing how effective a mere windbreak can be in combination with a nice fire and a warm sleeping bag.
 

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wage slave
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If you're talking strictly for a survival kit, a sheet of plastic or a tarp will do. But if you are already out backpacking or bugging out, chances are you'll have some sort of a formal shelter like a tent or the back of your truck or something.
 

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a large camo poncho with grommets along the bottom edges does double duty as raingear and shelter.
space blankets and bivys are compact.
 

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Scandinavian survivor
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It must be nice to have bug out plans for temperate climate. Here in Sweden, a round the year bug out plan with a tarp could kill you.
 

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It must be nice to have bug out plans for temperate climate. Here in Sweden, a round the year bug out plan with a tarp could kill you.
well could and does is 2 diffrent things... ive slept out side in winter with nothing more then an artic sleeping bag it was 6 layers and water proof.. I just went to sleep under a bush for warmth.. and that was enough for -15.. A tent isnt a good insulator all the time.. some are but they use reflective panels to collect heat from the sun.. haveing a good mat to sleep on and a sleeping bag something to keep you dry.. will keep you alive.. Sleeping in the artic with enough sleeping bags will keep you alive.. even with wind if the sleeping bag can protect you from it any exposed skin can get frost bite though..
 

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Maximus
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As touched upon up above, it depends on your climate.

In Florida, I like having a tent because it keeps mosquitos at bay. Yes I know there are nets, but it is much easier and helpful to have a tent.

Also I remconed a lightweight DOME tent. Not a bivey or tunnel type. At night, you may need to sit up and want to work on your preps, firearms, etc and having the room to sit up is needed.
 

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for me, first choice is house, second choice is tent, third choice is tarp, after that it's whatever i can find. if i can't be in a hard site, i'll have my tent with me. if something happens and i cant have a tent, i'll have a tarp. i prefer a tent to stay dry and warm and a tad more comfortable than a tarp, but a tarp is better than nothing. the groundcloth for my tent is a tarp, so i'll always have one.
 

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High Concept
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Get an aussie swag, its fast to roll out, and roll up and is good for all weathers, from snow, desert, jungle, tropics. You name it.

Australians have swagged it in all weather conditions, the swag is the synthesis of 100 million man years of experience.

Bug out with a swag, you won't regret it, trust me.

See this configuration shows the tough mosquito/ midgie/sandfly grade net underneath, this is for tropical jungle. It allows air to move about you but lets no insects in that would eat you alive.

The desert configuration would only show the window at your feet to be quarter open. It gets very cold in the desert and ice on your swag is all to common.

Alpine config: would have everything closed in the canvas, with just the vent hole at the top of the swag open.

The storm config: The vent holes closed and everything else.

The swag doubles as a backpack, and you can roll all your food and water up in it, and bug out in a minute flat.



Swags make sense.
 

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Good while it lasted!
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i've got the coleman tyl x2 tent. light and pretty cheap. good tent but not real rugged. i also have german flectarn shelter halves for light camping and as backup to the tent. btw the swag looks good.
 

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High Concept
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i've got the coleman tyl x2 tent. light and pretty cheap. good tent but not real rugged. i also have german flectarn shelter halves for light camping and as backup to the tent. btw the swag looks good.
Swags look good, but they are fast to set up, and hold all my gear.

I have been in all weathers with my swag, for 8 week swings doing exploration.

The Swag is the second home.

Many aussies take their swags to with them to parties, in case they over drink. They just set up the swag 20 seconds, and fall into a deep comfortable sleep, safe from all weather or insects.



Swags on lawns are are common site the morning after a huge party. The next thing you see is steam rising from the swags, as people start brewing their first one.



Swags are very low profile as well, whereas tents stand out like dogs balls.
 

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Maximus
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Swags look good, but they are fast to set up, and hold all my gear.

I have been in all weathers with my swag, for 8 week swings doing exploration.
...
Swags are very low profile as well, whereas tents stand out like dogs balls.
I only like these designs when up on mountains where the wind is tearing at your tent. Also I can see it being helpful when concealibility is an issue. But I have had the problem with not being able to sit up inside these coffins and doing things. I know you can work outside the tents, but at night or in the rain/mosquitoes it got old fast to have to do everything on my belly or back.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Survival situations require shelter as one of the big THREE!

Shelter is not always easy to come by especially after being forced to hike into the darkness. Would a useful bug out/ survival kit piece be an ultralite tent?

All those who may say that it is easier to whack up a quick tarp shelter may be 100% correct but tents offer more in some cases such as windproofing and insulation on top of that of your sleeping bag.

What do you think??
Until you have a lot of experience with camping in your area I strongly suggest buying a dome tent. I would not spend all that much yet.

Once you have 30 nights out to base your decision you might want to change to:
a) A real high quality mountaineering tent.
b) A real outfitters hunting tent with wood stove.
c) A low profile military tent.
d) A tarp.

I don't think anyone here can make that decision for you. Only experience will.
 

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While I have a swag, and it is insanely comfortably, and warm, it is quite heavy and bulky for the amount of sheltered area you get.

While I think swags are great if your going out for a day or two and can fit all your stuff, and they are great for "car camping", I dont think I would recommend one for a BOB...
 

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I've got a bivanorak bivvy bag.it looks like a below the ankles anorak and is bulky enough to fit over a mummy bag.you can also wear it as rain gear if you roll up the hem.it's a swedish air force survival kit item.
 

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A $30 heavy tarp from the general store works just as good and anything else for me 12x20. folds up nice enough i can store in B.O.B. or my back pack for camping. like it has been said, wind break works nice plus a roof over your head. small fire with a fire wall then you're set.
 

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Of course it would. Get one of those self erecting tents you just toss out and it puts itself up. Alternately, get a bivvy sac. Why would you want to waste time stringing out tarp lines or threading tent poles in a survival situation? It might be raining and cold and windy. The less effort shelter takes, the better. It doesn't have to look pretty or demonstrate your engineering skills. It just needs to keep the rain off, separate you from the dampness of the ground and hold some heat in.
 

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I think It depends on what the conditions are, am I traveling by foot or car? On foot with a pack there is only so much I could carry. If it was late spring, summer, or early fall in decent weather a good tarp would work. High winds, rain, or snow, I would want a good 4 season tent. Long term survival in the outdoors living off the land I would want a tent as well.
 
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