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Those of you with larger trucks and slightly larger aggressive tires (or at least the typical 265/70R17's for newer Ford's), do you run your tires at the factory stated level, or higher or lower? I had some tires with very thin sidewalls on my F-150 then got BF Goodrich 265/70R17 all terrains which is slightly larger than the normal offering in 2004. The shop literally aired them up to 50 psi even while cold, warning me to not go below that, especially in the front. Which, is a bunch of crap, I might as well of had tires made out of wood. Even 40 (when hot) is very rough. Even 37 shakes the cab more than I’d like.

The best ride is at 35 psi, which is the manufacturer’s stated pressure on the door, but when I do that the front tires look pretty low, but it seems that this is pretty common for those tires. Plus that is way lower than what the shop said... which is to not go below 50 on the front and 40 on the rear, and here I am running 35 on the front. Guess my question is whether 35 psi is the magic number or if that’s going to shred these things and make them wear quickly, which would suck since they cost $1,100. I know there’s the traditional chalk or water test for off-road tires, but the tread is touching all the way across from 35 to 50 psi so that doesn’t help much.

Just seems like 35 psi as printed on the door and judging by the ride quality is best, but the shop's recommendation and slightly sagging front tires has got me scared since they are so expensive.
 

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Well standard tires have a max psi rating of 44. Class E range tires for bigger trucks have a max of 80 psi. These are obviously maximums. Different tires will feel differently. Pop open your door and look at the vehicle manufacturer's recommended pressure. Going above may help with gas mileage at the cost of tire life. Too low will give you smooth ride but once again your tread will wear unevenly.

Unless you went to a tired much wider than stock, I'd keep with the sticker. My new tires on the truck were a bit wider so I had backed off a bit.

Hope you get it figured out. Let me know your results.
 

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So far, I just go w what the tire specifies , maybe a bit less than max air pressure... or I check the door jam sticker if its stock tires... ::shrug::
 

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I have 35" MTR Kevlars... I keep them at the spec 33psi. If you go lower than recommended you run the risk of uneven wear patterns on the tread - and when the tires cost $250 each you dont want that. Stick to the manufacturers spec... air them down as needed for the terrain. I cant think of any reason to put more psi than what the tire is rated for.
 

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how do u find the manufactures spec?.... I mean when u run a non-stock tire, where the door jam sticker wouldnt apply.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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The tire shop is likely recommending a pressure to maximize tire wear, not ride quality. Running your tires under inflated will cause wear on the outside and mushy handling.

I run most of my pickup tires at fairly high pressures, (65 psi) for 16 inch load range E tire, but then again I am towing trailers most of the time.
 

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Right now Im following the sticker on the door jam....

But I may change to a A/t tire.

Not sure what Ill do then.
 

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Those of you with larger trucks and slightly larger aggressive tires (or at least the typical 265/70R17's for newer Ford's), do you run your tires at the factory stated level, or higher or lower? I had some tires with very thin sidewalls on my F-150 then got BF Goodrich 265/70R17 all terrains which is slightly larger than the normal offering in 2004. The shop literally aired them up to 50 psi even while cold, warning me to not go below that, especially in the front. Which, is a bunch of crap, I might as well of had tires made out of wood. Even 40 (when hot) is very rough. Even 37 shakes the cab more than I’d like.

The best ride is at 35 psi, which is the manufacturer’s stated pressure on the door, but when I do that the front tires look pretty low, but it seems that this is pretty common for those tires. Plus that is way lower than what the shop said... which is to not go below 50 on the front and 40 on the rear, and here I am running 35 on the front. Guess my question is whether 35 psi is the magic number or if that’s going to shred these things and make them wear quickly, which would suck since they cost $1,100. I know there’s the traditional chalk or water test for off-road tires, but the tread is touching all the way across from 35 to 50 psi so that doesn’t help much.

Just seems like 35 psi as printed on the door and judging by the ride quality is best, but the shop's recommendation and slightly sagging front tires has got me scared since they are so expensive.
Factories cheat with tires for federal MPG ratings. You will find that any aggressive tire will ride rough, be noisy, and get crap for mpg since they have the rolling resistance of four boat anchors with a wear life of tissue paper.

That said, tires with aggressive tread may look neat but they are dumber than a 9 pound rock on the roads & highways.

Best, and safest, thing to do is look at the tire sidewall for max/min tire psi for that tire. Inflate to 5 psi less than max psi cold for best performance with those tires.

Next time buy regular normal tread road tires for your truck.
 

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DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCE LISTEN TO THAT DOOR!

Listen to the tire look what psi it says if it says 50 run 50 no less no more.

my family has been in tires for a long time and most tire issues are customers not running the correct psi
 

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DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCE LISTEN TO THAT DOOR!

Listen to the tire look what psi it says if it says 50 run 50 no less no more.

my family has been in tires for a long time and most tire issues are customers not running the correct psi
Yes, this it 110% correct. The tire Psi on the door is where the factory found the best softest ride for that car NOT the best,safest psi for the tires.
 

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I keep 35 in my front tires and 28 in my rear tires on my F150. Keep in mind how light the back of your truck is compared to the front...
 

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Well if your going to cry about ride comfort then why buy a truck ?

The higher Tire pressure will help with Tire Ware like the above said... should you go as high as they said maybe depends on the tire and what your load is like. I keep 40 to 42 in the truck its just a light truck it rides stiffer.... i have better fuel economony and i am not destroying tires as fast. If the weather gets ugly drop it down a 5 psi to 10 psi for more traction. Hell the Army does this for years with the CTI system.
 

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Not every one is worried about squeezing out an extra mile per gallon. I have a truck and I want it to ride like a truck. I have never calculated my miles per gallon except to calculate my range. I have better things to do. Fuel is cheap in the states. I'd rather be able to go where no one can follow. Besides during evacuations historically most people end up in bumper to bumper traffic stranded. I don't want to be one of those people. I'll make my own road else where.

I agree as far as checking the tires. If you changed your tires and suspension the specs on your car are useless. I run 50 PSI on both and if I need to lower it to get through rough terrain. It's obviously easy to do. Another peeve I have about highway non aggressive tires is that they are prone to blowouts or leaks from even things on the roads or pot holes. Yes I am in PA. lol
 

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????? How long do your tires and shocks last being under-inflated like this??
Under inflated?... They're inflated right for my truck. My Maxxis A/T's were only rated for 45 PSI, higher than that you risk bad things happening...

I drive a half ton truck with A/Ts on it. 35PSI is not low, 15 or 20 on the front tires is low UNLESS you're in alot of mud, then it's just right. My last tires lasted 60,000-70,000 miles. I've had the same Rancho shocks on my truck since 1996. There's a big differnce between the right PSI for a 1 ton truck and the right PSI for a 1/2 ton truck. HUGE differnce. My last tires, the rear tires wore out way before the front tires because I had the same PSI all the way around and it made the middles wear out prematurely. So now I keep the rears at a slightly lower PSI. That being said, I still had 10,000 miles left on those tires before they would have gone slick.
 

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For a pretty good method of adjusting your tire pressure to maximize tire life, try the "tire pressure chalk test" (google it). It will get you close to the maximum tire life pressure (but not necessarily the best fuel mileage pressure).

A quick and dirty method of determining if your tires are overheating is to stop and feel them after a bit of highway driving; if they are hot you need to check the pressure as it is likely too low.

Enjoy!
 

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Silent Defender
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Follow what the tire itself recommends. Remember back when Explorers were having blowouts from their Firestone tires? That wasn't Firestone's fault. Ford was recommending a different tire pressure than what Firestone was recommending in order to get desirable road noise and ride quality levels.

Every tire model is different. Even exact same sizes from different manufacturers may require different PSIs. Only the tire manufacturer knows what works best with which tire.
 

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Fisherman
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Have you ever noticed alot of lifted trucks with agressive tread tires are usually worn in the center. Thats because they are aired up too high.

Sure you'll get better milage as thier is less tread touching the ground, but youll wear out those expensive tires.

Theres not really a set psi for a tire on a vehicle. It depends on the type of tire, weight of vehicle, loaded or unloaded, etc.

I run 265/75/16 BFG All Terrain 10 plys on a Tacoma at 30 psi when empty.
When I have the 1200 # camper on, I run 55 in the rear and 45 front.

The best way to get EVEN WEAR out of your tires is to run a chalk line across the tread and drive 20 ft and check the line. If it's gone on the edges that too little air, if it's gone in the center than your psi is too much. Hope this helps.
 

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Unless the load rating on your tires are WAY different from stock or unless you are constantly loaded up heavy, stick to the psi rating on the door. If you are really having questions about it, do a chalk pattern.


hick
 
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