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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Tick Removal With Tweezers​

Every field first aid kit should have a pair of fine pointed tweezers. These special tweezers serve a dual purpose roll - they are good for removing small splinters and for tick removal.

It is very important that the tick not be crushed while being removed. If the tick is crushed, there is a chance that the fluids from the tick will be injected under the persons skin. This is one of the primary causes of infection, is when the ticks guts and bodily fluids are injected into the tissue of the victim.

When the person sees the tick, one of their first instincts is to grab the tick and pull it off. If a member of your family or hiking / camping group yells tick, or they have a tick - take control of the situation at once. Instruct the person not to grab the tick, tell them to stop and someone will remove the tick for them. Talk to the victim in a calm, clear voice. If the tick is attached, waiting a few more minutes for proper removal is not going to hurt anything. Consider this, how long has the tick been attached? It could have been there for hours, especially if it was under the persons clothes. So a few more minutes is not going to hurt anything.

While on a recent hiking trip, my nephew found a tick on his chest while he was swimming. We had been hiking for about 3 - 4 hours. So we had no idea how long the tick had been attached.

This picture is of my nephews chest with a lone star tick attached just above the nipple.


Have the victim sit down, or get in a position where they will not be moving during the tick removal.

Use the fine pointed tweezers, grab the tick where the body of the tick comes in contact with the victim and slowly pull. The tick should detach. If too much pressure is applied, the head of the tick might break away from the body. If the tick is pulled from the victim too fast, the head of the tick might detach. Do not just grab the tick with the tweezers and yank real fast. And do not grab the tick by the body. Place the tweezers between the ticks head and body and gently pull the tick away from the victim.

In this real life situation, the tick was safely removed with the head intact.


Some people say to use oil, or use a match and burn the tick off. I have not tried either of these methods, nor do I plan on it.

After the tick is removed, treat the bite area with some type of antibiotic ointment. In this case iodine was used.

The tick that was removed is a Lone Star Tick. This type of tick is aggressive in seeking out its victim. Unlike a lot of ticks, the Lone Star Tick can "sense" when a person or animal is near by. The tick will then try to find its victim and attach itself. The adult females have a distinct white spot on their back and males have white markings around the outside of their back. This tick species can transmit ehrlichiosis, Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and tularemia.

Once a tick is removed, check the site of the bite for a rash, or any kind of discoloration every few hours, then at 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours and a week later. If a circle rash appears, contact a doctor or emergency room at once.

24 hours after the removal of the tick my nephew, he showed no signs of infection, nor did his skin display any redness.

Notice the white speck on the body of the tick, this is an example of a Lone Star Tick.


My nephew did not want to video the actual removal of the tick. I can respect his wishes on that. So the tick was removed, head intact, and then my son filmed the video.


Some states have health departments that will test the ticks for diseases, but the tick must be shipped alive and in a sealed container. Most of the time only ticks that were removed from a human can be sent in for testing. Check the Department of State Health Services of your state for instructions on tick testing.

For more information see the Texas Tick website - http://www.ticktexas.org/
 

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Don't forget if you find a tick that isn't attached to someone, make sure you kill it so it doesn't breed more ticks or bite someone later on.
 

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Deo VIndice
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Notice the white speck on the body of the tick, this is an example of a Lone Star Tick.

Well Kev, if that is the case, you best pack yer bags and a lunch, cuz there's tons of them running around South Ga. and we would LOVE for you to have them back! :D
 
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tick removal

Kev,

You posted a video about this back in late April 2008, to which I had some comments.

That thread can be found here: http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=11849

Suffice it to say, I don't think the tweezers is the best method. The TICKED OFF spoon that I talk about in the above thread and which you can see in the pictures below is much more effective and doesn't carry with it the risk of rupturing the tick or leaving its head in the skin.

I have attached these pictures in an attempt to illustrate how it works. They're not the best quality, but they should be good enough.

The dog in the picture is named "Lily".

-Herschel
 

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*** Forgives, I don't
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We call them critters "deer ticks" and I have used a match to remove many of them. Blow the match out, touch it to the tick and it will back out and drop off for easy killing. If you use tweezers and are not careful you can pull its head off, this is where the "uh oh" factor comes in.
 

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Any method of pulling a tick has a high risk level. Pretty much anything can be put on them to make them let go safely. Carmex, KY, sunblock, bug spray, cooking oil, ect. The match works well too. I would advise aganst pulling under pretty much any situation.
Quick story about some of these myths. My ex wifes second husband pulled a tick off my daughter then killed it with a match. Dumb inbred hick. He was leaps and bouds ahead of hubbys #3 and 4 thou....
 

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I have found that liquid soap works the best for me!
Put some on a cotton ball cover tick for a few minutes an it will release on its own and will be on the cotton ball when u remove it.
 

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This is the best tool for the job that I've found, I wouldn't recommend gripping a tick between the head and body as this could sever the head and leave it attached to you

http://www.otom.com/homepage.htm

These are a small plastic prybar that easily lifts and removes all the biting parts, cheap, quick and simple.

Cheers

:thumb:
 

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Any method that involves pulling the tick may leave behind jaw pieces and cause an infection or worse. Serious folks, just put something, anything oily over them and they will let loose without leaving anything behind in just a couple of minutes.
 

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I also have used the match trick. Working on a farm growing up, looking for ticks was routine. I have also tried using liquid soap. I find that it works better with young children.
 
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