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Victory Loves Preparation
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really would like input here regarding a TDP. I plan to use a medium Alice pack with frame as my bag. I plan to keep this bag in my vehicle. So it will be exposed to summer heat and winter cold. Summer heat here is mid to upper 90's and winters get in the low 40's and sometimes freezing, but that is mostly overnight, when car would be in garage. I work 14 miles by roadway from my home, 40 minutes sometimes, depending on traffic. I'm about 8 miles, 20 minutes from my second planned rally point, by roadway, where I plan to stash a larger bag.

I have read the thread here about the best B.O.B. Ever and made notes and have started to purchased items to put in a bag, but that would be a really BIG BAG!

My TDP says it all. Three Days. Three days to get from work to home. Three days to get from home to next RP. Keeping in mind, planning on not being able to travel, any other way, than by foot.

I'm just getting a brain block on what to pack. Ideally, what I would need to to handle the three days, keeping in mind, once home, I can restock, hopefully, and then strike out again for the next RP.

Please offer comments of suggestions. PS - I plan to build this bag and go hiking or camping with it as a test once the weather cools a bit. That should be fun and offer all kinds of ideas on adding and or removing items.
 

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First... Don't we have enough names for BOBs/72hrKits/INCH Bags already?

Second, living 14 miles from work, it's likely you could cover that in one day (assuming you're in good health). Water, some food, a heating method, some heavier clothes (for winter) and some self defense should do the trick.

For a general BoB, the list would be much more extensive.
 

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Victory Loves Preparation
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Prag, I will give you that one, but my own acronym works best for me, I'm an old guy LOL. But good advice, Ty!
 

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Victory Loves Preparation
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, just so I can keep it straight, reply is more about sarcasm, than helping me with an answer?
 

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I'm far from an expert on this, but since I don't plan of really bugging out, my bag is a get home bag or any other emergency that may occur where I might need my stuff.

My son is a backpacker/hiker so he gave me good pointers on packing light weight items. I have a pack I got at REI that fits well and has lots of space.

I have some freeze dried food, titanium cookware set, reasonable first aid kit, steri pen water purification, magnesium fire starter and tinder(Strikeforce), as well as matches, emergency poncho and blankets (space blankets), headlamp flashlight (get one that is water proof), lightweight stove, Big Agnes sleeping bag, granola bars, good knife, .22 cal pistol, toiletry set in heavy zip loc bag, toilet paper in zip loc bag, trash bags in zip loc bag, paracord, extra socks and sturdy shoes and several bottles of water. Backpack has a hydration system but I don't keep it filled.

That is all I can think of for now, but concentrate on water, food, shelter first, with self defense being a close second.
 

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Victory Loves Preparation
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you both! Great ideas Dixie and the link page is awesome B, especially the link to " how to pack a bag", thank you both again!!!
 

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I really would like input here regarding a TDP. I plan to use a medium Alice pack with frame as my bag. I plan to keep this bag in my vehicle. So it will be exposed to summer heat and winter cold. Summer heat here is mid to upper 90's and winters get in the low 40's and sometimes freezing, but that is mostly overnight, when car would be in garage. I work 14 miles by roadway from my home, 40 minutes sometimes, depending on traffic. I'm about 8 miles, 20 minutes from my second planned rally point, by roadway, where I plan to stash a larger bag.

I have read the thread here about the best B.O.B. Ever and made notes and have started to purchased items to put in a bag, but that would be a really BIG BAG!

My TDP says it all. Three Days. Three days to get from work to home. Three days to get from home to next RP. Keeping in mind, planning on not being able to travel, any other way, than by foot.

I'm just getting a brain block on what to pack. Ideally, what I would need to to handle the three days, keeping in mind, once home, I can restock, hopefully, and then strike out again for the next RP.

Please offer comments of suggestions. PS - I plan to build this bag and go hiking or camping with it as a test once the weather cools a bit. That should be fun and offer all kinds of ideas on adding and or removing items.
Weight is important to consider

First you need to figure out how much water and food you need to get you home. My “get home bag” is setup as a 24 hour bag. In el paso water is important. I pack food items I can open and eat. Throw in a $10 roll of quarters and some $1 dollar bills in the amount you think might help get you home (taxi, bus, bribe) and you might want to get stuff out of a vending machine. Get a compass or a compass, match, mirror multiple item in one. Get a good multi-tool with a knife and can opener. Get a small bottle (the .5 or 1oz) of hand sanitizer. Get a small medical kit together with Band-Aids, some Neosporin, chap stick, a rubber tourniquet a small amount of any meds you take including Tylenol, antacids, vitamins, something to help you with chaffing of your legs. Get a small tactical high power LED flashlight and get a few light sticks (the kind you bend to light up). Get a map of your city and your state. Get a small 380 pistol or whatever you like that is small. Get a small stick of bug repellant. Put some ear plugs and sun glasses (or other eye protection in the bag). Get a small notebook, I mean very small, and write down all the numbers in your phone and emergency numbers and any other information you might need (think about your electronic devices failing). Get a whistle. Get a walking stick or cane that can smash glass. Get a good hat. Sun tan lotion in a small bottle. Get rain gear and sleeping gear. Fire starting equipment in a sealed container that you can find at any sports store or Wal-Mart. A few disposable respirators (like what doctors use). Toilet paper (half or quarter roll). And most important hike with your bag and use your stuff, that's what I do and I experiment and I try to think of more things I can carry and I consider other things I might remove from the bag based on use. My list is based on real use of the bag that I go out into the city and the mountain with every few days to train. So my list of items above is based on what I've learned in real practice.

No need for items to cook: what’s in your bag can be opened and eaten.
 

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Another thing that would help after getting more experience in the field hiking would be to walk up and down sporting goods and hardware stores and walmart and look at things. I find things to add to my bag that way. But be a good judge because some items are not necessary for a 3 day bag.
 

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Victory Loves Preparation
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice list and great suggestions LAST!!! Thanks!!! I had been planing on using a medium Alice pack, but yesterday I found a VooDoo Level III MOLLE Assault Pack at a thrift store for $5!! I couldn't believe it, I think it was barely used. I packed this today after thinking about the trip Im planning for. For the 1st time packing a pack, I think I did pretty good. I have about 90% of the items you mentioned and made a note for those that I missed. Thanks again for the great reply!
 

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Victory Loves Preparation
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Weight is important to consider

First you need to figure out how much water and food you need to get you home. My “get home bag” is setup as a 24 hour bag. In el paso water is important. I pack food items I can open and eat. Throw in a $10 roll of quarters and some $1 dollar bills in the amount you think might help get you home (taxi, bus, bribe) and you might want to get stuff out of a vending machine. Get a compass or a compass, match, mirror multiple item in one. Get a good multi-tool with a knife and can opener. Get a small bottle (the .5 or 1oz) of hand sanitizer. Get a small medical kit together with Band-Aids, some Neosporin, chap stick, a rubber tourniquet a small amount of any meds you take including Tylenol, antacids, vitamins, something to help you with chaffing of your legs. Get a small tactical high power LED flashlight and get a few light sticks (the kind you bend to light up). Get a map of your city and your state. Get a small 380 pistol or whatever you like that is small. Get a small stick of bug repellant. Put some ear plugs and sun glasses (or other eye protection in the bag). Get a small notebook, I mean very small, and write down all the numbers in your phone and emergency numbers and any other information you might need (think about your electronic devices failing). Get a whistle. Get a walking stick or cane that can smash glass. Get a good hat. Sun tan lotion in a small bottle. Get rain gear and sleeping gear. Fire starting equipment in a sealed container that you can find at any sports store or Wal-Mart. A few disposable respirators (like what doctors use). Toilet paper (half or quarter roll). And most important hike with your bag and use your stuff, that's what I do and I experiment and I try to think of more things I can carry and I consider other things I might remove from the bag based on use. My list is based on real use of the bag that I go out into the city and the mountain with every few days to train. So my list of items above is based on what I've learned in real practice.

No need for items to cook: what’s in your bag can be opened and eaten.
I'm new to this and hiking, trying to learn. Can you give me some examples of open and eat food, that you carry, that do not sub-come to your summer heat?

Thanks !
 

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CLIF bars, 6 of them is enough for 24 hours of sustenance.

For a comparison though, if I was planning on walking 14 miles, I would burn a base of 2200 Kcalories, plus ~200 for every mile walked, meaning that I would burn approximately 5000 calories over that 1 day of travel. I would plan on covering that 14 miles in 6-8 hours, depending on terrain.

Now, 6 clif bars provides about 1200 calories, so you end up with a deficit of 3800 calories. You'll be hungry when you get home, but you should have food available there.
 

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I'm new to this and hiking, trying to learn. Can you give me some examples of open and eat food, that you carry, that do not sub-come to your summer heat?

Thanks !
Lifeboat rations such as Datrex or Mainstay. They tolerate heat very well.
 

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Gone Galt
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Lifeboat rations such as Datrex or Mainstay. They tolerate heat very well.
:thumb:

Its the only thing that survives in my GHB locked in the black metal truck-bed box.

I have two packs - 6 days worth (Like three days if you are actually doing something)
 

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I'm just going to add a little bit to organization.

I backpack a good deal, and the first mistake of most new backpackers is lack of organization.

I have all of my equipment subdivided in my pack according to need. Each bag, or each need is a different color. For instance, my toileries kit is green, my fire kit red, food bag, orange. I use all waterproof bags. I use actual DRY sacs for fire equipment and compression dry sacs for my sleeping gear.

http://www.rei.com/category/40006345

Here is REI's selection of bags, there are a lot, and might seem costly, but these bags are all heavily tested in real world camping, rather than the cheap offering from generic sports stores, or far worse Wal-Mart type gear. Think car camping v backpacking, there is a huge difference in quality. The net is, get good gear and make sure you are well organized.

(Edit - and REI among other places offer classes on HOW to pack a backpack, this is as important, if not moreso, than what is actually in the pack)

I am comfortable walking 10 miles a day at 3-4 MPH, for up to 4-5 days, depending on vertical, with 40 pounds of pack, but few can do that amount. Water, Shelter and food. Depending on your enviroment, a high quality sleeping bag in a dry compression sac, with a potentially a tube tent will make life much more livable, in case you don't get home. At the very least an emergency bivy is a MUST. I carry one in EVERY bag. The bigger point I am trying to make is the amount you put in your bag of various supplies is directly related to the amount you can comfortably carry, at a sufficient clip. This requires exercise and testing from real world exp. This is critical and I don't see enough here talking about testing your own limits so you know how far and how long, with what weight YOU can actually move. That will greatly change what you put in your various bags.

(One final edit - You say you are using an alice pack, I would seriously suggest looking at a quality internal frame pack in the 40-60 CC size. This is extremely important.)
 

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Lifeboat rations such as Datrex or Mainstay. They tolerate heat very well.
These are good for emergecy, and agree they will probably be what you will want to ultimately pack.

You would be a lot happier on a packpacking trip to include some mountain house freeze dry and a pot to boil. (Backpacking Cook kit)
 
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