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As the old saying goes, "It's not what you know, it's who you know". Although in our situation, I believe that both are true.

I know that this subject has been touched on before, but I thought I would just mention a few things again to keep people thinking about it.

As I was trying to decide how much hard red wheat I was going to get and from where, I realized how important it is to know who grows the wheat locally. How many farmers within a day of me grow wheat? How many grow oats? How many grow anything that I don't grow, but might need?

In a SHTF scenario, would I know where to go to fill a few bags or barrels of anything I need? I am pretty well stocked up, but for how long? Besides it is way cheaper to go fill your bag up from the farmer himself. Do I know these farmers personally? would they be willing to help me out? Probably not in many situations. Luckily I come from ranching family and we know a lot of farmers and ranchers that would be willing to help out. But for the average joe schmo that has never made an effort to get to know these guys, I don't know.

This goes the same for doctors, dentists, vets, police officers, etc. I have good friends in all of these professions that I know I could go to if I needed their help.

I read somewhere that you should know everyone withing a days walk of your house that you may need to get help from. How many doctors live near you? Do you know them personally? Who owns a gun shop near you? Would they sell ammo to me in a SHTF situation? Who has a milk cow I'd be able to buy? Chickens to sell? Rabbits? Milk goats? etc.

Basically, without getting too long winded, it is important to get to know people on a personal level. Especially people that may be vital to your survival later. And know how to find them if you don't have internet or phone service.
 

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They used to be called neighbors and damn right it is good to know them. Get to know the professionals in your area if you can, but know the neighbor next door also. It is good to know who will be watching your back when the time comes. There will come a time when the more people you have contacts with, the better the value of life will be. Most of these folks won't be running Phone Book adds if things get too bad, and many will be working out of their homes to be able to afford a home. Next as you say find out where your local produce comes from and make a friend of your local farmer and rancher if you can, might offer to trade manual labor for supplies if they are short handed. You might be surprised how much wisdom they have and are willing to share.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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probably the most important preparation- contacts and friends. no one can do it all. and the more people you have that can work well together- the better your chances of not only surviving, but thriving in a pocket community
 
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