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This is the majority of this months food preps. I will probably buy some more food stuff, but this is the majority of it.



1 - MOUNTAIN HOUSE Freeze Dried Chili Macaroni #10 can
1 - MOUNTAIN HOUSE Freeze Dried Spaghetti w/ Meat Sauce #10 can
1- MOUNTAIN HOUSE Freeze Dried Hearty Beef Stew #10 can
2 - Diced Broccoli - 19 oz can

20 mylar bags

3 - 1/2 gallon bags of whole oats
6 - 1/2 gallon of quick oats
1 - 1/2 gallon of pinto beans
1 - 1 gallon bags pinto beans
3 - 1 gallon bags of rice (20 pound bag)
3 - 1 gallon mylar bags great value Elbows - macaroni product
3 - 1 gallon bags of mashed potatoes

My current goal:

Focus on #10 cans for freeze dried meat products, and some side dishes such as freeze dried veggies and powdered eggs.

Mylar bags for side dishes, such as beans, rice, potato flakes, and pasta.

Something I am not sure of, which one stores best - whole corn stored in mylar bags, or ground corn? I thought about buying a 50 pound of dried deer corn, and storing it in 1 gallon mylar bags. Then using a grinder to grind the whole corn into corn meal.

With the corn meal I can make tortillas, add powered eggs, cheese, and you have breakfast burritos. For fry the corn tortilla and make chips, taco shells, or tostada shells.

Another question - what is the best wheat to store to grind to make flour? My wife says that flour tortillas are better then corn tortillas for burritos.
 

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I would start with 50% hard red wheat and 50% hard white wheat. The soft white wheat is really only good for cookies and pastries. As your diet gets used to the wheat, you'll find yourself able to grind 100% hard red wheat with satisfaction.
 

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I like the idea of having grains like wheat and oats, but Ive never seen a place up here in the northeast where they sell them. I have my food grade buckets and some mylar bags, but no grains to store in them!:(
I watched one video here and found the prices of grinders for these items to be very expensive too. If I am able to find grain, is there an inexpensive way to grind it up?
 

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Patriot,

The hubby and I found a nice Corona hand-crank flour mill at an antique store for about $25. It's from the 70's, I think, and does an admirable job on whole wheat berries. Today at ebay there's one just like it for $19.99.
 

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I like the idea of having grains like wheat and oats, but Ive never seen a place up here in the northeast where they sell them. I have my food grade buckets and some mylar bags, but no grains to store in them!:(
I watched one video here and found the prices of grinders for these items to be very expensive too. If I am able to find grain, is there an inexpensive way to grind it up?
There are a lot of options in budget priced mills. You don't have to spend a fortune on them. Spend a little time with the search feature and you'll turn up a bunch of posts from people reviewing lower priced mills.

I bought a Country Living, which was quite pricey. It's a good mill, but if I had it to do over again, I would probably have gone with two lower priced mills. That would allow two people to share the work, given me a backup, and probably still ended up saving me some money.
 
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