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Information is Ammunition
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On December 17, 1944, the Japanese army sent a twenty-three year old soldier named Hiroo Onoda to the Philippines to join the Sugi Brigade. He was stationed on the small island of Lubang, approximately seventy-five miles southwest of Manila in the Philippines, and his orders were to lead the Lubang Garrison in guerrilla warfare.

http://www.damninteresting.com/the-soldier-who-wouldnt-quit/
 

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Less law not more prisons
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That's damn interesting!

On a side note, that man is a TRUE survivor. He would make ALL of us look like amateurs.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
back when we all actually had FAITH in ours
 
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Silent Bob
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On December 17, 1944, the Japanese army sent a twenty-three year old soldier named Hiroo Onoda to the Philippines to join the Sugi Brigade. He was stationed on the small island of Lubang, approximately seventy-five miles southwest of Manila in the Philippines, and his orders were to lead the Lubang Garrison in guerrilla warfare.

http://www.damninteresting.com/the-soldier-who-wouldnt-quit/
Guys like this is why we had to nuke Japan.
 

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The Maker
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anyone know ANYBODY with this kind of conviction? japan should have given him a castle and some servants and a life time supply of money money monaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyy! wonderful article. id like to read his book.
 

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Retired Army
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He wrote a book. Great reading even though he was kind of a fanatical idiot. (Loyal to a Fault maybe) Tells how he stored ammo, trapped rats and many other things.
Anyway, it is well worth the read.

Al
 

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Retired Army
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Bumping the Thread.

I just re-read the book again over the weekend. I would like to add to what everyone else has said about this guys loyalty.

What a lot of people do not realize is that:

1. He was specifically trained to lead soldiers behind enemy lines in guerilla activities. This was his job. He was not just some soldier who decided not to surrender.
2. He was told, by a Lieutenant General, that Japan would come back and get him.
3. Because of the secret nature of his mission, he could only take orders from someone in his chain of command.
4. His being trained to be deceitful made him suspicious of any attempt to get him to come out of the mountains.
5. When he finally came down out of the mountains, in spite of being 52 years old, he was still the 23 year old Lieutenant that had gone up into the mountains. This immaturity probably had a lot to do with his poor decisions to stay in Lubang for so long.

Anyway, still a good book. I only wish that it went into more specifics about "how" they did, the things they did, to survive. The bushcraft for an example.

Al
 

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Retired Army
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Al, is that "No Surrender. My Thirty Year War?"
Also good is "The Last Samuri" by Oba. I believe he was on Saipan, I don't really recall.
That is the one RPD.

I have read some other stuff about some of the others but, Onoda was the one that lasted the longest.

Al
 
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Old Soldier
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Home from work and checking the ol' bookshelf shows the book I had in mind - "Oba The Last Samurai" by Don Jones. On Saipan, 1944-1945, Capt Oba and a small band held out for over 18 months against over 100,000 Marines and soldiers, until 3 months after the surrender ceremony on the deck of the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. He surrendered on his own terms.
The author was a Marine who fought on Saipan and survived an ambush by Oba's band.
Presidio Press, 1986.
 

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Preparing since 1972
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I remember reading something back in the 70's about a Japanese soldier like this i wonder if it was him or another....
 

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Retired Army
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I remember reading something back in the 70's about a Japanese soldier like this i wonder if it was him or another....
If it was in the 70's it could have been Onoda or his buddy that was killed. I think his buddy Kazuka was killed in 1972 and then he, Onoda, surrendered in 1974.

Al
 
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Looks like rain to me.
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I read the story about this soldier back when he came out of the woods. He had ammo cached all over the jungle, his clothes were shredded but his resolve never waivered.

A true soldier.
 
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