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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’v been musing of late, and reached a conclusion regarding what is, in my humble opinion, the best option for a “pick your bad scenario” shotgun. The old single shot... God Himself only knows how many millions have been made, most of em are simple and reliable as can be, with few moving parts to wear or break. Loads for literally anything from birds and bunny, to bear; and everything between. With a black powder adapter, you don’t even have to have cartridges... just 209 primers or percussion caps (I’ve seen both)... just pour your charge, tamp it, wad, pour whatever you have on hand down the barrel, wad; then have at it.


Anyways... I’m fond of the platform in general, if it isn’t obvious. Any fellow single shot lovers on here ?
 

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I'm waiting for a good frost and then knock some squirrels out of the tree tops. 22 works great too and much cheaper to shoot. 410 and 20 gauge ammo is not available around here so kind of hate to use them .
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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There are lots of good quality single shot shotguns but it could never be my choice as a TEOTWAWKI shotgun. I'd pick a good pump before I chose a single shot but even better are some of the modern semi-auto shotguns. Very reliable while holding several rounds. If a roving band of zombies is headed my way I don't think I want to ask them to wait a sec while I reload. But that's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are lots of good quality single shot shotguns but it could never be my choice as a TEOTWAWKI shotgun. I'd pick a good pump before I chose a single shot but even better are some of the modern semi-auto shotguns. Very reliable while holding several rounds. If a roving band of zombies is headed my way I don't think I want to ask them to wait a sec while I reload. But that's just me.
I’d be willing to bet that not a one of em will run black powder for long
 

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As a SHTF gun…… Only if Im staying home. Shotgun Ammo is too heavy and too bulky to carry on missions. I’d take a .22 lr over an shotgun. Just my opinion.
Yup. After many years of considering which gun I'd carry into a bug out situation, I've decided on the .22LR (25 round, semi-auto) with noise reduction equipment. ;):cool:
 

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James Reeves did a test of the Maverick shotgun, ran 500 rounds with no pauses, it worked perfectly.
He also tested the Black Aces tactical semi auto. Not so good.

Point being, you’ll spend more getting a reliable semi auto. $100 for a break action, $200 for a pump, $300 for a semi that might work....
I have a semi shotgun, and I like it. But I shoot the pump guns more. Maverick Security 8 and an Ithaca Model 37. My 2 break guns get loaned to kids when we take a few to the range, I rarely shoot them.
 

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Definitely not the best for run and gun. But that's why everyone owns more than one type of gun. If every time you look for or buy a gun you think it needs to be used in a gun battle to kill people, it's easy to come to different conclusions then hunting or running a trap line.

For hunting it forces you to shoot better because you likely don't get a second shot. The best teaching tool for learning to hit things consistently is something that slows you down and gives you no follow up.

They break down rather compact too.
 

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I have a box lock SxS with two triggers. As I understand it, even if one side breaks, the other side of the lock would work. I don't shoot it a whole lot because it kicks like a mule, but if anything is likely to still work pretty much forever, this thing probably will.

The muzzleloading adaptors are interesting. I may have to pick up a pair.
 

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The limitation of the shotgun is the weight and cube of its ammunition. Twelve-gage rounds are 9 rounds to the pound. If resupply is a great distance away you must make a box or so of ammunition last as long as possible. Fifty 12-ga. shells weigh about 5 pounds. That establishes a realistic limit so as not to impair your ability to carry other kit. Likewise a short-barrel, break-open single-shot gun also weighs about 5 pounds. You will probably want a recoil pad unless your gun is a 20-ga. or smaller.

A single barrel shotgun aiming with the bead sight only on a plain barrel can place a slug about as accurately as a non-expert can shoot a service pistol or revolver using an improvised rest at the same distance. Reality is hitting a soup can at 50 feet, a quart oil can at 50 yards and a gallon water jug at 100 yards. Adding rifle sights to your single-barrel shotgun doesn’t improve its inherent accuracy, but only lets you “zero” the gun so that it will “hit where it points.”

Putting sights on short-barrelled, open-choked shotguns is over-rated. Rifle-sighted, single-barrel "survival" shotguns are usually choked improved cylinder and have short barrels or 20 inches or so. They are handier to take apart to stow in a rucksack, but produce patterns much thinner than a modified or full choke, so effective game range is greatly reduced. If accurate slug shooting beyond 40 yards is important, you should carry a rifle instead. Is it not worth giving up 10-15 yards of effective game range, limiting you to about 30 yards with a 12-ga. Improved cylinder gun, to get a short length and rifle sights whose benefit is mostly mental?

A common sporting gun with 26 inch barrel and modified choke is best for general use. Full choke guns are more common and work well if you pattern them and select ammunition carefully. As a "basic load" of shotgun ammunition I would store a 250-round "flat" of No.8 shot "dove and quail" loads, and another of No.6 shot "duck and pheasant" rounds, then buy 50 rounds each of buckshot not smaller than No.1, and slugs.

A common “sporting” single-shot, break-open 12-ga. is legal in most places which prohibit civilians from possessing a handgun or center-fire rifle. If self-defense is more important to you than putting game meat in the pot, an automatic ejector gun is needed which can be accessibly carried, concealed when necessary, which handles easily and can be quickly grabbed, instinctively pointed and fired instantly. Only a short, ejector gun of no longer than 36 inches meets this requirement and can be laid on the floor of your vehicle for discreet transport and easy access.

WW2 experience determined that fewer than three pellet hits of 00 buckshot did not produce instant incapacitation, unless vital areas of the head, neck, or chest were struck. Presuming a random distribution of as few as three pellet hits on a silhouette fired from a cylinder bore at 30 yards, hitting a vital spot depends on luck and random variations of chance.

Three pellet hits with 00 buck approximate the kinetic energy of a single round of .45 cal. M1911 Ball or 9mm NATO M882 ammunition fired from the service pistol. More than three hits of 00, when their combined effect is distributed over the body, produce greater shock to nervous, vascular systems and organs than a single projectile of the same kinetic energy.

For law enforcement and military purposes 4 hits of 00 buckshot is considered "adequate," producing a high probability of instant incapacitation. Any shotgun reliably producing 5 hits with 00 at combat range from 25 to 30 yards is said to provide "good" performance. More than 5 hits is considered "outstanding." The common Remington Express 9-pellet buffered load of 00 buck with no shot sleeve, as fired from an Remington 870 cylinder bore 20" riot gun averages 7 hits on an “E” silhouette at 25 yards. This falls off to 3 hits at 40 yards.

Any single-shot gun can be consider only as a “shoot and scoot” weapon used to provide an opportunity to break contact and escape. When limited to a shotgun for defense, an opponent who knows that you are so-armed will change the battlefield conditions to his advantage. In an extended fight an adversary will undermine your use of the shotgun by staying outside its limited range and plink away at you. He fire from behind substantial cover capable of stopping buckshot, and expose little of himself, being difficult to hit with a slug beyond pistol range. He will then rush while you are reloading or extend the time of battle until you run out of ammunition.

When using a single-barrel shotgun, you must quickly end the fight at close range. Exploit your shotgun’s strengths, surprising the bad guy who didn’t expect you to be armed, while you escape the killing field before an opponent can take advantage of your weapon’s limitations. With practice you can learn to reload and fire an automatic ejector gun far more rapidly than most people would expect, especially if you carry spare ammo on an elastic carrier on the butt.
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I’m not a big shotgun guy, I have had a few 12 gauges and they more or less always felt underpowered compared to what you saw in the movies or see on YouTube. I know they’re not actually but they just never clicked with me. A 12 gauge single shot with a 3.5” chamber has been something I’ve been looking at lately.
 

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I keep an old Stevens 20ga as a knock about forager, had it for many years countless shells through it. Contrary to popular belief they do break, mine has the front trigger guard breach latch broke the whole assembly once and the hammer spur another time not even sure how but it was rolling around under the jumpseat in the truck like always and when i drug it out wah la it was broke... I welded the spur and bought the trigger guard and breech latch from Gun Parts & Firearm Accessories | Numrich Gun Parts

So if your going to seriously use one of these simple but rugged long arms have more than one (y)
 

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I’v been musing of late, and reached a conclusion regarding what is, in my humble opinion, the best option for a “pick your bad scenario” shotgun. The old single shot... God Himself only knows how many millions have been made, most of em are simple and reliable as can be, with few moving parts to wear or break. Loads for literally anything from birds and bunny, to bear; and everything between. With a black powder adapter, you don’t even have to have cartridges... just 209 primers or percussion caps (I’ve seen both)... just pour your charge, tamp it, wad, pour whatever you have on hand down the barrel, wad; then have at it.


Anyways... I’m fond of the platform in general, if it isn’t obvious. Any fellow single shot lovers on here ?
I've never quite understood the obsession with single-shot firearms, myself. If I had to choose only one gun for survival in the bush, and was looking for simple and reliable, it would be Baikal IZH-94 TAIGA in 12GA over .308. Why settle for one barrel when you can have two? Sadly, the ban on Russian imports has made them scarcer than hens teeth.
 

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I've never quite understood the obsession with single-shot firearms, myself. If I had to choose only one gun for survival in the bush, and was looking for simple and reliable, it would be Baikal IZH-94 TAIGA in 12GA over .308. Why settle for one barrel when you can have two? Sadly, the ban on Russian imports has made them scarcer than hens teeth. It's a shame they don't make them in 12GA over 7.62x39, judging by the cost of .308 ammo these days.
Its shocking how much Baikal stuff is going for. They are simple and solidly made, but hardly very sophisticated or refined. Always seem to go bang, though.
 
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