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Michigander
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just stumbled upon this PDF for
The Ships Medicine Chest and Medical Aid at Sea

Lots of good info there. About 400 pages if you print it.

edit: Both this AND the Amazon are 2003 edition. Look at their "sample" to show cover listing 2003 even though 2014 is listed on the sale page. Use your own judgement, I can't verify.
 

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Storyteller
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Check the year of publication! Many of the procedures have changed in recent years.

Also, the new printed version is for sale on line - Amazon - The Ship’s Medicine Chest and Medical Aid at Sea: Human Services, U.S. Department of Health and: 9781312782167: Books $35, buy the paperback and save the $$ for printer ink.

History of this FedGov publication and warnings - Ship's Medicine Chest and Medical Aid at Sea (fas.org)

"The need for medical care has been a constant since the day the first merchant ship sailed centuries ago. Concern for the health of merchant mariners has, from the beginning, been a part of our nation’s history. In the 1700’s, legislation mandated that a Medicine Chest be carried on each American Flag vessel of more than 150 tons, provided it had a crew of ten or more. By 1798, a loose network of marine hospitals, mainly in port cities, was established by Congress to care for sick and disabled American merchant seamen. Called the Marine Hospital Service, later the Public Health and Marine Hospital Service, and finally the Public Health Service, these federal entities continued to provide healthcare to merchant seamen until 1981. The Ship’s Medicine Chest and Medical Aid at Sea has been a part of much of this maritime history. This edition has evolved through many previous editions. The Public Health Service published the first Medicine Chest in 1881 under the title, Handbook for the Ship’s Medicine Chest. "

BTW - get professional training!
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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On the boat (US submarine) 80s ... no doctor, no dentist, just an E5 corpsman.
A coffee can of boat candy (tylenol) in the mess decks.
Wisdom teeth pulled prior to service even if no issues
No comms with or electronic references avail. for medical emergencies
-- there was a medical transfer option if deemed serious enough to break patrol
 

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The Lieutenant
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On the boat (US submarine) 80s ... no doctor, no dentist, just an E5 corpsman.
A coffee can of boat candy (tylenol) in the mess decks.
Wisdom teeth pulled prior to service even if no issues
No comms with or electronic references avail. for medical emergencies
-- there was a medical transfer option if deemed serious enough to break patrol
E5 minimum, Independent duty trained to include dentistry. Navy Corpsman were assigned to Marine detachments, often at the platoon level. All were called Doc. We had an E7 Chief on my one sub that would break a leg running if he heard “Corpsman” yelled.
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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I didnt mean any disparages towards corpsman as our doc was a good man as well and I have a friend that ran as a pecker checker in the sand with Marines.

My intent was when 4 knots to nowhere I was glad I was not the one that developed Orchitis and sat in ops lowerlvl for almost a week only able to wear a towel. Then and now things have changed a lot, I assume halfway night is no longer a thing either
 

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Even ashore physician's assistants and nurse practitioner's are becoming more common. They can have their place but I have had them misdiagnose giving the wrong treatment and prefer having a regular doctor. If you're bleeding anybody is good to see and they may have more hands on than a doc.
Tylenol especially but any otc pain killer is pretty easy to overdose and is not for long term use. Pretty common to hand out in military though.
 

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On the boat (US submarine) 80s ... no doctor, no dentist, just an E5 corpsman.
A coffee can of boat candy (tylenol) in the mess decks.
Wisdom teeth pulled prior to service even if no issues
No comms with or electronic references avail. for medical emergencies
-- there was a medical transfer option if deemed serious enough to break patrol
The first guided missile cruiser I was on had a doctor. About 1200 guys. Second cruiser no doctor, but only about 500 guys.
 

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Even ashore physician's assistants and nurse practitioner's are becoming more common. They can have their place but I have had them misdiagnose giving the wrong treatment and prefer having a regular doctor. If you're bleeding anybody is good to see and they may have more hands on than a doc.
Tylenol especially but any otc pain killer is pretty easy to overdose and is not for long term use. Pretty common to hand out in military though.
Clinic Dr. not there. The PA refused to check my chart. Misdiagnosed. (I told her issue)
so next AM see my Dr. who freaks. “Ambulance to major hospital, IV drugs, surgery…”. I had to tell her “calm down. They won’t operate today. You call get stuff ready, tell me when to be there. I will get set up”. They had opening 6am. So I headed in midnight, got there 3am. Saved thousands.
 

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the UK publishes it's own version - used to be free downloadables for earlier editions >>>>>

Note the last version I looked at was downscoped on treatment and diagnosis under the assumption that you had 24/7 satellite communications anywhere in the world ( more or less accurate). When a MD meant a phone patch through WLO in Mobile, AL on HF, there was more information in the book of benefit to the prepper.
 
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