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Lux in Tenebris
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I came across this and was instantly fascinated by it..how long in a SHTF scenerio would this place be occupied by....


The pics are gerat/creepy....

http://www.lovethesepics.com/2011/0...r-of-abandoned-six-flags-new-orleans-75-pics/



How long after civilization collapses will it take for our infrastructure to crumble into a rusting, weed-choked hellscape? With the help of some flooding, just a few years, if the current state of Six Flags New Orleans is any indication. Pump systems failed after Hurricane Katrina, leaving the site in up to seven feet of brackish water for about a month, corroding the rides and wrecking everything else. The park site is now property of the city of New Orleans after Six Flags declared it a total loss, collecting insurance and moving a few salvageable rides to other parks. The front gate is open, and the city already has enough problems and can't pay for 24-hour security. That means local teens and roving urban explorers have found their way in to show us all the carnage.
 

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Noob-Lite
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Granted I'm just a dumb woman, when it comes to certain things, but I'm thinking that's a LOT of metal for recycling prices?
Yes and no. Some of those roller coasters could be dismantled and re-assembled else where. Others would only be good for scrap, but after you get done with the demolition and hauling it off, wages and fuel prices would kill any profit.


hick
 

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This is a good example of what could happen nation wide if society and the economy worsen. That park might well represent what major cities will look like when there are no monies to fix roads, buildings, bridges, and other infrastructure. When electricity and water are not running it takes only a few weeks for things to begin crumbling, rusting, and looking like a ghost town. This is a peek of what things can look like on a much larger scale.
 

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Bleach blonde on fire :p
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Yes and no. Some of those roller coasters could be dismantled and re-assembled else where. Others would only be good for scrap, but after you get done with the demolition and hauling it off, wages and fuel prices would kill any profit.


hick
BS....DH Griffin out of Greensboro NC has done tons of demo and recycling for many places including some abandoned parks and other places that others wouldn't touch ..... your looking at some MAJOR metal there and with prices rising it is worth it ..... there are dozens of companies that would take that job and make some cash ..... DH not only recycles the metal they also recycle the building materials and fixtures.



There is a abandoned city not too far away from me....creepy indeed but was a cool place when it was new.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soul_City,_North_Carolina




 

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This is a good example of what could happen nation wide if society and the economy worsen. That park might well represent what major cities will look like when there are no monies to fix roads, buildings, bridges, and other infrastructure. When electricity and water are not running it takes only a few weeks for things to begin crumbling, rusting, and looking like a ghost town. This is a peek of what things can look like on a much larger scale.
I think that the massive cities America built in deserts, such as Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Los Angeles, will eventually be abandoned. Let's face it, a desert is a bad place for a city of 4 million people, as Phoenix was in 2007. Once the water runs dry, life cannot exist there. There was an article in the High Country News in 2007 about the Hohokam Native American society that once existed on the site of Phoenix, and how it was destroyed by drought. The article suggested that modern Phoenix would suffer the same fate. If you google "Phoenix Falling" it used to be at the bottom of the first page of search results. Much of North America is uninhabitable in the traditional sense without massive infrastructure. Virtually every civilization that arose in NAm-the Mound Builders, the great civilizations of the Southwest-eventually disappeared, having exhausted the land. When whites arrived we found Stone Age levels of society.
 

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BS....DH Griffin out of Greensboro NC has done tons of demo and recycling for many places including some abandoned parks and other places that others wouldn't touch ..... your looking at some MAJOR metal there and with prices rising it is worth it ..... there are dozens of companies that would take that job and make some cash ..... DH not only recycles the metal they also recycle the building materials and fixtures.



There is a abandoned city not too far away from me....creepy indeed but was a cool place when it was new.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soul_City,_North_Carolina
I am a ghost town buff, and watched the video in hopes that they'd have more photos of Soul City, only to be disappointed. I have found the same problem with the ghost town of Salton City, California, which was built as a speculative boom community during the 1950s housing bubble-few photos. I sometimes wonder if these "new ghost towns" hit too close to home for Americans for them to be greatly documented in the same way that Goldfield, Nevada (1904-19) is, for example. When the gypsum mining town of Empire, Nevada (1922-2010) was abandoned, an MSNBC story took photos of practically everything BUT the town.

Soul City is not on my 2010 Rand McNally atlas page of NC, but its likely location-in a remote area near the town of Macon-is not conducive to being a viable community. The wiki page says that money meant to go to the building of Soul City was "misappropriated", ie stolen, which is likely why the place never got off the ground, that and the remote setting.

The industrial building that became a prison is telling-states generally locate prisons in remote areas with few residents, so that escapees may be easily captured, and to limit the damage they can do if they do get out. Also, such areas usually have few objections to a prison. If urbanization takes hold of an area somehow, the preferred response is to move the prison, which is what Nevada did with the Silver Springs Women's Facility when "ranchettes" started lapping at its borders.
 

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Google up "Urban Exploring" to find a bunch of this kind of stuff. I have done some myself and have scouted out a perfect temporary bug out location this way.
 

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Those were the days....
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Ever seen "Life After People" on the History channel? They documented an abandoned amusment park just down the road from me. Looked just like that. Guess they did their homework.
 

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Not just the metal, but many things in the photos could be recycled/reused. NYC dwellers would pay big bucks for some of those items.
I find it hard to believe that, as the captions stated, that place is too expensive to demolish/scrap. I'm sure that all that steel could be used by the Chinese. To let something like that simply disintegrate because nobody will pay for demolition is just stupid imo. Sell it to the feds, let them turn it back into a swamp, uh I mean a "protected wetland". The low lying areas of NOLA will never be inhabited again, so why not remove the levees (instead of rebuilding them) and turn it into what God meant it to be, a swamp? Build a levee around the French Quarter, and turn the rest into swampland. That would also protect the parts of the city in the west side that didn't flood.
 
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