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Discussion Starter #1
So I know we miss alot of foods here especially native foods that have been long overlooked. It would be nice if we could have a thread where all of these foods are discussed in the thread. Please avoid any comments to this thread unless you are adding a different food or giving relevant information on a posted food. That way it is easier to scroll and read.


Acorns were a staple of the native american diet and the trees are everywhere these days.


http://youtu.be/wcXdK0FUiA8

http://honest-food.net/2010/01/14/acorn-pasta-and-the-mechanics-of-eating-acorns/

Uses: Flour, Pasta, pancakes

Acorns must first be leached of the tannic acids they contain. To do this they are shelled and placed in water to be boiled. The water must be emptied and replaced several times until it remains clear. The acorns are then dried and ground into flour. Acorn flour is high in protein, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and niacin.
 

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Cactus

http://youtu.be/mGzvJbDI404

http://www.foodreference.com/html/art-cactus.html


The blooms, fruit, seed, and entire plant of the pricklypear can be eaten. In the summer the blooms and pads can be eaten raw, cooked, or dried. Both are high in calcium, and the blooms are high in vitamin C. In the fall the fruits and seeds as well as the pads can be used. The fruits are high in potassium and the seeds are a good source for vitamin C.
 

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Papershell pecans...I am always on the lookout for a Papershell Pecan Tree. The local insurance agent had one in the yard in front of the office...AND CUT IT DOWN!!!!!!!!!!! Very mature tree too. Lost my business:mad:

Great for pies, fried pies and quick and healthy snacks.
 

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The one thing to keep in mind is that for those who depended on "native food", 40 was old age. Even with that being said, no one could deny the need to know the "native" food in the area you live or plan to travel through.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Insects

Example nutritional information

---------------- Crickets-- Mealworms-- Waxworms-- Superworms--Fly Larva--- leanbeef 1oz

Protein---------- 20.72---- 18.65------- 15.40-------- 18.92---------- 15.32-------- 6g
Fat--------------- 5.74---- 13.64 ------- 20.12-------- 15.07------------ 5.96-------- 3g
Carbohydrates- 3.06---- 3.62------- 2.54------------ 5.81------------- 8.46--------- 0g
mg/100g Calc.-- 21.53---- 3.28------ 13.14------- 10.80 -------------- 17.73---------0
mg/kg Vit. C----- 105.90-- 38.10----- 23.60--------- 9.80-------------- 9.80-----------0
Dietary Fiber---- 2.80------ 2.00------ 1.60--------- 2.20-------------- 2.70---------- 0g
Calories/Fat ---- 51.66---- 122.76---- 181.08----- 135.63----------- 53.64-------- 49
 

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Survival needs aside, the lime is totally overlooked as a food. It's like the drunk college girl of fruits; sure, it's great for some tequila and a good time, but nobody sticks around to see what's underneath and all the great attributes about it otherwise. Definitely underrated :D:
 

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So I know we miss alot of foods here especially native foods that have been long overlooked. It would be nice if we could have a thread where all of these foods are discussed in the thread. Please avoid any comments to this thread unless you are adding a different food or giving relevant information on a posted food. That way it is easier to scroll and read.


Acorns were a staple of the native american diet and the trees are everywhere these days.


http://youtu.be/wcXdK0FUiA8

http://honest-food.net/2010/01/14/acorn-pasta-and-the-mechanics-of-eating-acorns/

Uses: Flour, Pasta, pancakes
thats a great idea. i have been studying usable plants in my area for a few years now.not just eatable but also medicinal. i have also been planting things in wild areas to increase the density of wild foods.just plant things like avocado,asparagus,garlic,onions,peanuts,potatoes,sage,rosemary,mint, thyme .fruits,nuts. and a whole lot more and make a map of the area so you can go out and find food when you need it. most people will starve to death in a garden of plenty because they don't know what food looks like without a wrapper. i just named a few. there are many more foods you can get established in the wild areas near you for future use. just plant one or two things every chance you get. not only will it feed you but it will help feed the wild animal population that will also feed you.
 

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Black Walnuts

walnuts supply omega-3 fat (a “good fat”)
essential minerals
antioxidants
protein and fiber

Can be added to cookies and other baked goods or eaten as-is.

black walnuts may lower cholesterol and lower stress
 

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Javelina Rodent

Javelina is the deer of the next decades. Deer were once considered a nuisance that farmers where grateful to have gone. It now is a multi-billion dollar sporting industry. All because someone decided shooting bambis dad with a super scoped rifle was somehow an accomplishment. As the deer populations in many areas have met their demise at the hands of Rambo Javelinas have migrated to take their place. A true nuisance Javelinas breed like rabbits and are experts at surviving.

Sorry I am not anti-hunting just anti super hunter that feeds, waters and trains the deer on property with feeders and then thinks he is something he is not. The only deer hunting I support is bow, black powder, low income rural families that need the supplement and kids learning.

Javelina is known as not edible because of musk glands and a reputation of being dirty. It is in fact very edible especially immature Javelina that do not have fully developed musk glands.
 

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The one thing to keep in mind is that for those who depended on "native food", 40 was old age. Even with that being said, no one could deny the need to know the "native" food in the area you live or plan to travel through.
Living primitively is a hard life. Living exclusively on a hunter-gatherer lifestyle no doubt would cause some malnutrition issues long-term. All the long-lived cultures I know of are agricultural. However....that doesn't mean the food is unhealthy or otherwise bad for you. Just that maybe it doesn't have as much "to it" as a commercially grown vegetable. Including the bad stuff....
 

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The one thing to keep in mind is that for those who depended on "native food", 40 was old age. Even with that being said, no one could deny the need to know the "native" food in the area you live or plan to travel through.
I would think the total lack of knowledge of germs and lack of medical care would have far more to do with mortality than native food diets.
 

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Here in AZ the hearts of mature Agave is what is used to make Tequila. It is edible and is used to make agave nectar. Kind of like a giant desert artichoke heart. Also aloe grows easily and has many medicinal and nutritional uses. Dandelions make great salad greens, the flowers and roots are useful and edible as well (and man do they grow like crazy here after a rain!) Javelinas (bush pigs) are becoming more prevalent (they ate my pumpkins off my doorstep during Halloween) They are one of those animals that may always be around like feral hogs. I will add some more as the ideas come to me.
 
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