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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is this fixation on POWER among modern survivalists? Solar, batteries, and generators, and a small trailer's worth of electronics.

Today's reliance on electronics and power is simply complicating things.

Shelter, water, food, medicines, armaments, and simple navigation. (Maps and a compass). As for transport and other technological wonders?

Call it naive, but I remember a light bulb moment I was gifted.
It went: "The nice nice thing about the end of the world as we know it is . . . .
It will still be there afterwards."


Translated into 'no way morally correct' speak?
What you need is out there, you only need to find it and take it.

Like others, I have unfortunately experienced war and natural disaster and know that once no one is around (especially gooberment and their attack dogs).

If you are resourceful and have some form of foraging training, there is always plenty to find.

Unless you deliberately live in the middle of nowhere with nothing within 100 miles of you and 4 flat tires or a broken crankshaft. Even then, and only if your bush craft skills are up to scratch, you just may survive. If you can breath the air and drink the water.
 

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What is this fixation on POWER among modern survivalists? Solar, batteries, and generators, and a small trailer's worth of electronics.

Today's reliance on electronics and power is simply complicating things.

Shelter, water, food, medicines, armaments, and simple navigation. (Maps and a compass). As for transport and other technological wonders?

Call it naive, but I remember a light bulb moment I was gifted.
It went: "The nice nice thing about the end of the world as we know it is . . . .
It will still be there afterwards."


Translated into 'no way morally correct' speak?
What you need is out there, you only need to find it and take it.

Like others, I have unfortunately experienced war and natural disaster and know that once no one is around (especially gooberment and their attack dogs).

If you are resourceful and have some form of foraging training, there is always plenty to find.

Unless you deliberately live in the middle of nowhere with nothing within 100 miles of you and 4 flat tires or a broken crankshaft. Even then, and only if your bush craft skills are up to scratch, you just may survive. If you can breath the air and drink the water.
Not everyone preps for JUST the end of the world.

Many of us prep for those small nuisances like losing power due to weather. Why sit in the dark for 2 hours or 7 days, when you have access to technology and things to continue somewhat normally?

And to be honest...even in TEOTWAWKI, I plan on having radios (HAM HF and local VHF/UHF for patrols), it would be nice to watch a movie after struggling day in and day out to survive, and having some electricity would make things a bit easier ie. grinding wheat berries.

Look at it this way, just because the end of the world happened should I just accept that I have to drink crappy water that's only boiled to kills the bugs, or should I take advantage of new fangled ceramic filtering to clean up the water for use?
 

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Some people legitimately need it. Some arent clever enough to circumvent electrical needs. Some people just want power when the lights go out and its not the end of the world.

I loved power outages as a kid, they were fun for us because we had no responsibility. That was until i saw grown men cry when their families were cold and their pipes were bursting causing thousands in damage because they had no generator to keep their furnace running.

Electricity can be a force multiplier or a hindrance- the ability to live without it represents a greater obstacle than learning to produce it.
 

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What is this fixation on POWER among modern survivalists? Solar, batteries, and generators, and a small trailer's worth of electronics.
Common sense at work.
If the World truly DOES End, no one will need any power. Neither will they need bushcraft skills or compasses. They be dead.
Common sense says that Earth ain't near as likely to explode into small fragments as it is to experience blackouts, storms, riots, and maybe an earthquake here or there. Nice to be comfortable, well fed, and able to monitor what's going on during those Less Than End of the Whole Freekin' World times.
 

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Let's say it's a TEOTWAWKI that isn't an EMP. Sure would be nice to have an operational solar system to do things such as...

Electronic perimeter alarms
Charging night vision devices
Charging flashlights/ gun lights
Home lighting
Charging battery power tools (for example, the chainsaw that heats my house/shop)
Running the water pump that provides pressurized water from my IBC tanks
Fans to keep cool at night

A generator can have you living like the disaster never happened. Remember, most disasters are very temporary, keep it real. Either way, power is a force multiplier.
 

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More a fan of T.S. Eliot:

This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper


Maybe it will be fast, maybe slow, or maybe not at all. Too many people sharing too little acreage, foraging is not an option in most areas. We have quite a few freezers and fridges, would like to keep that investment, SHTF or simple power outage. Don't have enough to live forever, but do have enough to outlive most and get back to basics.
 

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What is this fixation on POWER among modern survivalists? Solar, batteries, and generators, and a small trailer's worth of electronics.

Today's reliance on electronics and power is simply complicating things.

Shelter, water, food, medicines, armaments, and simple navigation. (Maps and a compass). As for transport and other technological wonders?

Call it naive, but I remember a light bulb moment I was gifted.
It went: "The nice nice thing about the end of the world as we know it is . . . .
It will still be there afterwards."


Translated into 'no way morally correct' speak?
What you need is out there, you only need to find it and take it.

Like others, I have unfortunately experienced war and natural disaster and know that once no one is around (especially gooberment and their attack dogs).

If you are resourceful and have some form of foraging training, there is always plenty to find.

Unless you deliberately live in the middle of nowhere with nothing within 100 miles of you and 4 flat tires or a broken crankshaft. Even then, and only if your bush craft skills are up to scratch, you just may survive. If you can breath the air and drink the water.
Paul,

You're using a real wide paint brush when a small, mini, nail polish brush would be more appropriate.

My main use of batteries is for flashlights / torches for our medical kit in case must deal w/ injury or take some type of pill during condition of no/limited visibility. Yes, backed up with fire-producing matches for starting other illumination.

True, I'd miss the battery powered SW radio receiving the BBC's chimes and news but this would, of course, mean I do not need to take the stomach pills.
 

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Call it naive, but I remember a light bulb moment I was gifted.
It went: "The nice nice thing about the end of the world as we know it is . . . .
It will still be there afterwards."


Translated into 'no way morally correct' speak?
What you need is out there, you only need to find it and take it.

Like others, I have unfortunately experienced war and natural disaster and know that once no one is around (especially gooberment and their attack dogs).
Can you give an example? What I am taking from your post is that it is not necessary to invest in power generation because you can just take it from others once they perish? Am I missing the mark?
 

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Why risk fighting for something later on when I can safely purchase it now when I can afford it. Right now I have access to unlimited manuals and videos if I don't understand how to operate what I acquire.

My jackery battery box is nice for camping, my generator helped with construction projects, and my solar panels saved me from having to have a power line ran to my new garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Not everyone preps for JUST the end of the world.

Many of us prep for those small nuisances like losing power due to weather. Why sit in the dark for 2 hours or 7 days, when you have access to technology and things to continue somewhat normally?

And to be honest...even in TEOTWAWKI, I plan on having radios (HAM HF and local VHF/UHF for patrols), it would be nice to watch a movie after struggling day in and day out to survive, and having some electricity would make things a bit easier ie. grinding wheat berries.

Look at it this way, just because the end of the world happened should I just accept that I have to drink crappy water that's only boiled to kills the bugs, or should I take advantage of new fangled ceramic filtering to clean up the water for use?
You see this is what I'm talking about.
Ever tried to live without shops, no pharmacies, access to money, fuels, running water, or electricity?

Meanwhile, Ceramics don't use power. Neither do clay pots.
Know how to fire a clay pot, without an electrically powered oven?
Grinding berries needs an electric grinder?? How lazy is that!
Before grinding forest berries in a pot, I boil them first as it softens them up.
Coffee beans also hold no fear for me and I don't use a grinder.
Gain over effort, an important survival trait more should learn.

As for only planning for the EOTWAWKI?
When a tornado, hurricane, or tropical storm hits or a levee breaks, and wrecks a home or a town. For some that IS the end of their world.

Meanwhile, a financial crash may not cause a lot of physical damage, but oh boy, given time it will.

You mentioned Radio. Mine run off common enough AA (LR6) batteries.
With a 3.3.3 radio watch I have enough batteries to last 6 months. Seeing as though those batteries are arguably the most commonest cells in the world. What do you consider the chances are of finding a couple in a house or abandoned shop? Now think about the woods. Which tree stocks AA batteries again? When you run out of fuel, how will you power anything if you can't source fuel?

Foraging intelligently, or being able to survive using the basics is becoming a lost art as most seem to depend on high tech, electronics, and electricity.

Maybe everyone thinks having power or some way to generate power makes prepping easier?
Easier, anything that makes things easier is good, but being over reliant on electronics or 'grinders' isn't very wise.

What is the game plan when you throw a switch and nothing happens?

Some people legitimately need it. Some arent clever enough to circumvent electrical needs. Some people just want power when the lights go out and its not the end of the world.

I loved power outages as a kid, they were fun for us because we had no responsibility. That was until i saw grown men cry when their families were cold and their pipes were bursting causing thousands in damage because they had no generator to keep their furnace running.

Electricity can be a force multiplier or a hindrance- the ability to live without it represents a greater obstacle than learning to produce it.
Yes it can be a force multiplier, especially when it comes to communications and security. However, and as said above.

What is the game plan when you throw a switch and nothing happens?

Most old school survivalists and preppers have studied and practiced the old ways to survive. Only there is another, more modern person.

They are orientated towards having the latest "must have" and relying on high tech devices. Take shooting. Hands up all them with a high tech ballistic calculator? What happened to old school, what competent shooters used. Dope books and perhaps Mildot masters. Both don't use batteries.
 

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Each of us is exponentially more likely to face SHTF events where power is interrupted short-term rather than an end of the world event. It is therefore prudent, wise and just downright common sense for anyone who is a prepper in the modern world to have backup power as a priority. Not too many of us have made the change to a grizzly-Adams lifestyle, where we have no need for power.
The ability to enjoy modern "conveniences" such as heating, air conditioning, lighting, information, refrigeration, etc is a necessary prepper tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Can you give an example? What I am taking from your post is that it is not necessary to invest in power generation because you can just take it from others once they perish? Am I missing the mark?
Yes you have missed the main mark.
RELYING on power to run whatever is OK but more are relying on technology above having a basic survival skills. IMHO that's isn't the best way to go about things.

However, you are right about my thoughts on foraging.
It seems that's the immoral side of survival.
So I have a question for you.
Once someone has 'perished', what use to them is what they had?
Would you starve your family, or allow them to freeze, to hold the moral high ground behind the idea that "it was never your stuff".
Interesting concept my friend.
 

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What is this fixation on POWER among modern survivalists? Solar, batteries, and generators, and a small trailer's worth of electronics.
Could not agree less.

If for some reason the electric grid in the US failed, the US would instantly be a nation in crisis.

Air travel would come to a stop. Travel by car would come to a near stop as no traffic lights would work. No computers would work. There would be no lights from electricity. There would be no more working elevators. If there were no electricity how would gas pumps pump gasoline? There would be no heat in homes with electric heaters.

Power is so important I consider it to be one of the Holy Trinity of needs: water, food, power.
 

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It's no different than the "fixation" on other methods of making things easier or more effective.

After all, why do you need a knife, or matches, or a ferro rod, or a saw, or an axe? Aren't you complicating things with that?

And what about firearms? Shouldn't we go back to bows and arrows? Or thrown rocks?
 

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My jackery battery box is nice for camping, my generator helped with construction projects, and my solar panels saved me from having to have a power line ran to my new garage.
I paid for the run to my shop, in 2020 before prices went crazy. Once I put up solar down there, my breaker is off. Lighting, freezer, hell I even run my table saw from the system during daylight hours. Given the energy prices here in Texas, it'll pay itself off fairly quickly if I can find more load to shift over to it. Same for my house one that mostly runs the garage (freezers, fridges, comms, etc.), does a good job offsetting my electric bill.

You see this is what I'm talking about.
Ever tried to live without shops, no pharmacies, access to money, fuels, running water, or electricity?
Yep, spent a few years dirt poor, spent most of my time in the woods. We barely got by, thankfully Grandpa had tons of chickens and was a great gardener. I'll take modern luxuries. Texas went without power for days in the dead of winter, it was SHTF for some, they died. We sat comfortably by the fireplace sipping hot cocoa (or whiskey), with a DVD playing on the TV running off the solar batteries.

It's not just about losing power for us, it's also about cutting our costs. As inflation goes, every dollar I spend today I lock in today's value of that dollar. If I can get enough solar to offset rising energy prices, I've more than paid for the system. And if the world ends tomorrow, I'm better off than 99% of my competition. I've experienced sleeping in the dirt for months at a time, and sleeping in nice hotels on Times Square. I'll take whatever luxury I can get, figure we'll have enough to worry about... Besides, light extends the day, so we'll get more done.
 

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The term "power" is the rudder here. 150 years ago, fire was the power. Life was based on camp and cooking fires. In war, they set villages on fire. Today, same thing but electricity has largely taken on the role of fire for being ubiquitous. So we have grown up with electricity much how for thousands of years our ancestors only had fire. It's only natural to want to keep that warm blue electric glow around us when we are in dire straights. It's modern day man's warm campfire. But then again, we have both fire and electricity. What a wonderful time to be alive.
 
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