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As a paramedic turned RN, I constantly amaze my co-workers with some of my "archaic" bandaging techniques. My co-workers will slap a 4x4 gauze or non-adherent pad to a wound and wrap some Kerlix or Coban around it and call it good.

I started years ago wanting to be a paramedic after watching the TV show "Emergency." Johnny Gage and Roy DeSoto were my role models and made a 9-year-old want to be a paramedic.

My mom was an RN and she had many nursing and medical texts in the living room library. I started to read her American Red Cross First Aid Textbook she read when she was in nursing school. (First Aid per se is not commonly taught in nursing programs anymore.)

I spent many nights bandaging the dog or my sister with bandages made from strips of old bedsheets while looking at the descriptions and illustrations in the first aid manual. I became a boy scout and earned my first aid skill award and first aid merit badge. I became a lifeguard and earned my Red Cross Advanced First Aid certificate. The bandaging techniques taught in both boy scout and red cross first aid were not as extensive as those found in my mom's first aid book.

I joined the Coast Guard and again went through Basic First Aid and then EMT training.

Fast forward to paramedic training and nursing school and the training in bandaging techniques are limited.

I still have my mom's Red Cross First Aid textbook and look at it from time to time when I feel nostalgic.

If we have an SHTF or TEOTWAWKI event, medical resources are going to be difficult to find and limited as society de-evolves. With this in mind, I suggest that anyone who has limited first aid knowledge consider getting an American Red Cross First Aid Textbook from the '40s, '50s, or '60s. This is the time of pre-modern EMS when ambulances were operated by funeral homes and the only training the ambulance attendant had was Red Cross First Aid.

When first aid supplies are at a premium and proper wound care could mean the difference between a wound healing with little trouble or developing sepsis.

I realize that much has changed in first aid knowledge over the decades, however, the lost art of bandaging and first aid will be a lifesaver when TEOTWAWKI happens. Good first aid could mean the difference between living or possibly dying of sepsis because of the lack of the correct available antibiotics.
 

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Lol, the first paragraph or two sound familiar. I studied a first aide book as a kid, could not get enough. I was rather disappointed in the EMT course when I took it. I think an in depth wilderness course might be good. When I read an article about fixing a dislocated shoulder in an old outdoor magazine it reminded me of real first aide. Not the immobilize and transport. Sometimes transport is hundreds of miles or days away.

Having animals means some interesting wrapping at times. Devising ways to keep wraps on is more of a challenge! Clean and open is sometimes what reality is. Clean may mean cleaning several times in a day and fighting teeth, nails, hooves, heads, etc.
 

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..started years ago wanting to be a paramedic after watching .. "Emergency." Johnny Gage and Roy DeSoto were my role models ....
..Seconded! And, you have No idea now Bad I wanted 'KMG365' for my HAM call.. :D: I know, 'get in line', right? ;) But I only ever made EMT-B back in '92-95.. Was one-class away from making AEMT-I, but had to drop out due to a Fam crisis (Grandmother had a very large aneurysm rupture between her parietal and temporal lobes.. She coded twice, but they were able to revive / operate, and after months of PT, she lived on for almost 15 yrs, but we were All like 24/7 for weeks with her, and I just couldn't spend the time I would have needed-to. Then #1 Son was born, etc, etc, and life just had to 'move on'..)

..Anyway, yeah, it's surprizing how many people think 'all you need is the typical 72 hr-bag "first aid kit" and yer all set.. Including workplaces that should know better.. ie: here's a recent 'I just Had to 'fix it' situ: https://www.survivalistboards.com/showpost.php?p=19467684&postcount=37423

..Often find great deals on 'pro stuff', at RE: https://www.rescue-essentials.com ...for restocking our 'DIY' Paks, and there are some good suppliers with great pricing on eBay, as well.. Ya can just never stock enough gauze and 5x9s.. :thumb:

My lil' Sis just made RN last year, and it's been great 'talking shop' / learning stuff not-taught to us in EMS.. :cool:

.02
jd
 

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My co-workers will slap a 4x4 gauze or non-adherent pad to a wound and wrap some Kerlix or Coban around it and call it good.
Well, this is simply, its because in the bus we only have to take care of it for 45 minutes (in my AO) and we know that within a couple minutes of getting to the ER the doc is going to take it all off anyway.

A lot, unfortunately, of what we do in EMS, is more or less useless in the SHTF as without definitive care its not going to do anything for them but slow their death a little.

And the other stuff....is outside our scope of practice.

EMS is awesome for a prepper but we have to temper it with the realization that the game will be radically different when YOU are the definitive care.
 

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As a paramedic turned RN, I constantly amaze my co-workers with some of my "archaic" bandaging techniques. My co-workers will slap a 4x4 gauze or non-adherent pad to a wound and wrap some Kerlix or Coban around it and call it good...
When I was in engineering school a long time ago, the course textbooks were all fairly recently published. They tended to be poorly written and a little confusing as the author had not mastered the subject enough to explain the topics easily.

Finding older textbooks was like a goldmine. written by brilliant people, who laid everything out so simply. And if the textbook sat in a library for 30 years, it had stood the test of time and was deemed worth keeping on the shelf.
One favorite was Feynman's Lectures on Physics.

And another old text that contained Maxwell's magic box. A simple little figure that could be used to generate all of Maxwell's equations. (as well as illustrating the beautiful symmetry in the various relationships).

And old sailing texts and old military handbooks. wonderful combination of a window into history and of the older techniques in use in those times.
 

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A basic 1st aid class should be taught in high school.
In the 70's we did a long course on basic first aid in health class. I loved it. And yes, Rampart, I watched Emergency!, too. I still have the books and I believe one of them is the Red Cross one. I'll need to go look.
I remember it seemed like much of the wound care was centered around the triangular bandage. You could do so many things with it! Wrap a head wound, sling an injured arm, use a winding stick and make a tourniquet. Lots of uses.
I have all the new whizbang, vacuum sealed, multipurpose compression bandages and CAT tourniquets now but all of my kits contain at least one triangular bandage. Multiple in my bigger kits.
My wife and I have both taken the first aid courses offered by our local EMT's. CPR, Stop The Bleed, etc., but I would like to take more advanced courses someday.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Ideally things are treated with a combination of old school and new understanding. Neither school of thought holds all the answers.

Nurses like to put tape chevrons on their IVs and medics know they haven't the time to be so precise and pretty. Not to mention chevrons don't hold well when someone tugs on the tubing.

Most nurses are not taught proper bandaging - it is an acquired skill that comes with practice. Most medics never get enough practice to make it a reality.

In my world view the best docs have street skills to back them up and the better nurses likewise; assuming they are engaged in real patient care and not just interviews and paperwork care.

RR
 

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Discussion Starter #10
In my world view the best docs have street skills to back them up

RR
One of the best emergency physicians I know was a paramedic for 14 years before going to medical school.

I pitty the medics (not really) who try to BS the doc why they did something that was inherently stupid when the doc calls them on it.
 

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Medicine evolves. It's a muscle, flex it or lose it.

I can't remember how many times they changed the guidelines on what to do with burn bandages in my career. Dry sterile? Wet with water? Wet with saline? Wait, now dry sterile again? etc etc.
 

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Medicine evolves. It's a muscle, flex it or lose it.

I can't remember how many times they changed the guidelines on what to do with burn bandages in my career. Dry sterile? Wet with water? Wet with saline? Wait, now dry sterile again? etc etc.
This is why we do a refresher course every 3 years.
(Dry again)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The thought behind wet and dry dressings comes down to whether the patient has the ability to regulate their body temperature.

For large body surface area 2nd degree/partial-thickness or 3rd degree/full-thickness burns, the body loses its ability to regulate its temperature due to damaged skin.

To prevent hypothermia, treatment is to cool the burn, address pain with analgesics and prevent hypothermia using dry sterile dressings.

If the burn is on fingers from touching a hot pan or such then a wet dressing is not going to cause hypothermia. Do Not use ice on burns as this will cause the heat to be driven downward, into the tissues, causing more damage.
 
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