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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
4 ways to tell if a plant is edible

1. bread open of crush the leaf of the plant and smell it.
-leave it if it smells bad or of peaches and almonds

2. rub juice from the sample on an area of sensative skin. (inside your elbow)
- wait about 15-20 min and check to see that there is no rash iritation or stining sensation.

3. place a small piece on your lips for about 5 seconds then wait about 15-20 min. if there is no stining, burning or numbness the you can do this again on corner of your mouth tip of tongue and under tongue.

4. if there are no iritating feelings under your tongue then swallow a SMALL piece and wait about 2-3 hours if there is no unplesent reaction you can eat the plant


please let me know what you think of this and if you have any other suggestions please leave them thank you.
 

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Nothing beats positive identification;

Dont quote me on this but I heard the edablity test was designed to given downed pilots a better than average chance.

Personally I wouldnt trust this method.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i wouldnt trust it that it would always be correct but is better than going around and just eating plants it is always better to read about plants and to be able to recognize but it is always better to have something to go by.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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That is not the edibility test. That is a very abbreviated test. And to be frank, the entire edibility test is worse than not eating. I would do it only as a very very last starving resort. Let me tell you a true story.

As many of you know I am an expert at edible wild plants. Last year I wondered if I could add a particular small red flower to my salads (Salvia coccinea.) I had a lot of them and they would look nice. I researched it extensively. It has been planted as an ornamental around the world for over 200 years. It comes from a family of plants that we eat every day. There were no reports of toxicity or poisoning at all. In short, while the edibility of the plant was not known there were no reports of poisonings or toxicity ever, anywhere for over hundreds of years. It did have minor medicinal use, so that told me it was consumable and survivable.

Day one (not hour one) day one, I rubbed one petal against my lip. Nothing. I waited a day, as you are supposed to do in the edibility test, not a few minutes. Day two, I tasted one small petal and quickly spit it out. Nothing. Day three, I tasted an entire petal, waited one minute, and spit it out. It tasted peppery but that was all. Day four I ate a piece of one petal 1/8 inch square (That's smaller than the surface area on the head of a pencil eraser.) Within 60 minutes -- the usual time a plant will effect you -- I was dizzy and over the next three hours I developed a horrible stomach ache. It did not worsen past that and I did not go to the hospital. But, my stomach ached for three weeks. Three weeks. It was a miserable three weeks.... And for a little piece of petal 1/8 inch square, of a plant with no bad history.

Now, it could be argued that I did indeed follow the real edibility test and it worked. Okay, I can buy that. All I got was a stomach ache for three weeks but I was alive and recovered. But more so, it was a plant I identified, and researched, not a total unknown. It was a plant considered safe. If I had eaten an entire blossom after a few minutes of "testing" it would have been a trip to the hospital.

Remember that the next time you think about the "edibility test." Nothing beats knowing the edible plants in your area. Nothing.
 

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Only one part is accurate but it is accurate in the wrong way. Leaves of the prunus family do smell of almonds when crushed. It is not almonds but cyanide. But, the fruit of many trees with leaves that smell like that have edible fruit. But, if there is a fruit that smells like almonds and is not an almond I would not eat it.

There are some rules however.

If it looks like a mint and smells like a mint it is edible (BUT IT MUST HAVE BOTH, LOOKS AND SMELLS.)

If it looks like and onion or a garlic AND smells like an onion or a garlic it is edible (BUT IT MUST HAVE BOTH, LOOKS AND SMELL)

99.99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999 of white berries are toxic. Avoid them all.

All mustards are edible someway

All mallows are edible some way.
 

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That is not the edibility test. That is a very abbreviated test. And to be frank, the entire edibility test is worse than not eating. I would do it only as a very very last starving resort. Let me tell you a true story.

As many of you know I am an expert at edible wild plants. Last year I wondered if I could add a particular small red flower to my salads (Salvia coccinea.) I had a lot of them and they would look nice. I researched it extensively. It has been planted as an ornamental around the world for over 200 years. It comes from a family of plants that we eat every day. There were no reports of toxicity or poisoning at all. In short, while the edibility of the plant was not known there were no reports of poisonings or toxicity ever, anywhere for over hundreds of years. It did have minor medicinal use, so that told me it was consumable and survivable.

Day one (not hour one) day one, I rubbed one petal against my lip. Nothing. I waited a day, as you are supposed to do in the edibility test, not a few minutes. Day two, I tasted one small petal and quickly spit it out. Nothing. Day three, I tasted an entire petal, waited one minute, and spit it out. It tasted peppery but that was all. Day four I ate a piece of one petal 1/8 inch square (That's smaller than the surface area on the head of a pencil eraser.) Within 60 minutes -- the usual time a plant will effect you -- I was dizzy and over the next three hours I developed a horrible stomach ache. It did not worsen past that and I did not go to the hospital. But, my stomach ached for three weeks. Three weeks. It was a miserable three weeks.... And for a little piece of petal 1/8 inch square, of a plant with no bad history.

Now, it could be argued that I did indeed follow the real edibility test and it worked. Okay, I can buy that. All I got was a stomach ache for three weeks but I was alive and recovered. But more so, it was a plant I identified, and researched, not a total unknown. It was a plant considered safe. If I had eaten an entire blossom after a few minutes of "testing" it would have been a trip to the hospital.

Remember that the next time you think about the "edibility test." Nothing beats knowing the edible plants in your area. Nothing.
Reply]
You skipped a step. You are supposed to steep the tiny sample into a tea, and drink a portion of that in a very diluted form. Then, if there are no bad signs, drink it a little stronger. If it is not causing harm after you can make a stronger tea out of it. If you are still good, THEN you can sample eating a small amount of it.

Did you research the medicinal use? how was it used medicinally? Many medicinal plants are poisonous in anything but the smallest amounts.
 

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From what I have read, the steps listed are probably the best way to test, obviously you need to read the signs and be prepared for a bit of hunger and stomach cramps.
 

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Reply]
You skipped a step. You are supposed to steep the tiny sample into a tea, and drink a portion of that in a very diluted form. Then, if there are no bad signs, drink it a little stronger. If it is not causing harm after you can make a stronger tea out of it. If you are still good, THEN you can sample eating a small amount of it.

Did you research the medicinal use? how was it used medicinally? Many medicinal plants are poisonous in anything but the smallest amounts.
Tea is not part of the test. My point is the edibility test is the very last thing a person should ever do regarding a plant. It is a do or die necessity thing, not something to use all the time.
 

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From what I have read, the steps listed are probably the best way to test, obviously you need to read the signs and be prepared for a bit of hunger and stomach cramps.
NO, there is no best way to test. Testing is stupid. It is a means of very last resort. It is something you use if are starving to death and there is no bugs or rats to eat. It is not SOP. It is extraordinary and the only way to avoid dying. The best thing is to know.
 

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Reply]
Y
Did you research the medicinal use?
That question is an insult. I am a professional. Yes I did that. My point is "testing" is done only when there is no other way. There was no other way for me to ascertain its edibility if I wanted to know. If I were in a survival situation I would have never done that because there is no nutrition in a blossom.
 

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Much as a noob as I am when it comes to plant ID (believe me I'm working on it)and much as it pains me to agree with SR (jk), I have to 110% agree.

If your stuck and have nothing else to eat and no idea go for it, but if theres anything no matter how gross grubs bugs rats bats ANYTHING go for that first.
Just another reason to practice practice practice. Relying on any sort of testing will only get you killed this goes back to the Wilderness Rambo thread mentality
 

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Discussion Starter #13
i am not saying that this way is the only way i had it on there before but then i edited it and forgot to re write it it is always better to study and b able to identify the plants this is for a last resort and at least gives you something to go by to help rule out some plants even if you had no idea what anythinh looked like or were able to identify it sorry if i offended you
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Tea is not part of the test. My point is the edibility test is the very last thing a person should ever do regarding a plant. It is a do or die necessity thing, not something to use all the time.
Reply]
The test I learned, the Three stage Tea portion, is part of the test. Other than that, it's the same test you described, except without the under the toung part.
 

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i am not saying that this way is the only way i had it on there before but then i edited it and forgot to re write it it is always better to study and b able to identify the plants this is for a last resort and at least gives you something to go by to help rule out some plants even if you had no idea what anythinh looked like or were able to identify it sorry if i offended you
reply]
For long term, I think it is actually a good idea. It will give you a greater range of edibles to supplement your diet. Your body will begin to know the medicinal effects of local plants too. I have certain herbs i make a cough and congestion formula out of. When i am beginning to get sick I actually crave those herbs like a pregnant woman craves pickles and icecream.

My theory is that the body knows what it needs, and if exposed to medicinal substances, it will crave them when an illness is coming on. I assume one would have to be living close to nature though. The modern "Baconator Super Cheese burger" type might not be that intune with thier own needs.
 

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Reply]
The test I learned, the Three stage Tea portion, is part of the test. Other than that, it's the same test you described, except without the under the toung part.
I mentioned only part of it... not all of it... the edibility test takes several days and should be an act of last resort before starving. It is a fool's gambit other wise. If you are starving it is an option, otherwise it is something one should rarely consider. But I am tiring of the immaturity of this discussion.. If you want to get sick and or kill yourself with the "edibility test' that's your business. I am done with this nonsense.
 

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Protine is what you need to be after,if nothing else then bugs and grubs are a fine sourse.Plant knowledge is a must, but if critters eat it then it should be ok.Plants more for medicinal use.Roots and tubers are another good sourse for food but again knowledge is best.Taste test was taught in mil survial courses.
 

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Protine is what you need to be after,if nothing else then bugs and grubs are a fine sourse.Plant knowledge is a must,
Yes.

but if critters eat it then it should be ok.
Not necessarily.
Insects can tolerate and even use things in some plant that would be sickening or lethal to anything else that ate it.


knowledge is best.
Yes.

Taste test was taught in mil survial courses.
So was the solar still and it is more consumptive of energy and fluids than it is worth generally.
 

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Solar still was mainly used in open water survival.Just tagged behind you while you floated along waiting to be rescued.desalination bags were a bigger pain.
 

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i think the only good bloody use for this test is in a long term SHTF situation to add some local vegitation into your diet. you dont use it when starving, as you will starve while you are doing it. you use it to add more food to the list of things you can eat.
 
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