Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Founder
Joined
·
16,867 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Lets say SHTF tomorrow, what would your survival gear stockpile look like? For a lot of survivalist it would be mostly beans and bullets – meaning not very much thought has been put into the plans.

When the SurvivalistBoards youtube channel was opened, I wanted to publish a wide range of videos. The plans were to post videos about everything from gardening to wilderness survival. There are certain topics that do better then others. It seems that fishing videos probably do the worst in view counts, and firearm videos do the best.

But to have a balanced channel and blog, I think one should cover a wide range of topics. It seems that example videos and articles work best. Instead of saying what people should do, I show people what I am doing, and end it with that. Then let the viewer make up their own mind.



How does all of this relate to stockpiling survival gear?
When dealing with survivalism, I do not think its enough to just stockpile bullets and beans. A well rounded, long term SHTF survival plan, should cover as much information and resources as possible.

It is not enough to buy a case of 7.62×39, store some rice and beans in mylar bags, and then proclaim you have a well rounded survival plan. Ammo, rice and beans are not a well rounded plan.

Lets look at a well rounded SHTF food plan:
SHTF Day 1
Cook the meat in the fridge and freezer
Plant a garden
Canned goods
MREs
Food in mylar bags – rice, beans, oats, other stuff
Harvest food from garden
#10 cans
Hunting
Fishing
Gathering wild edible plants

SHTF 6 months later – I plan on still being able to eat good.

If there is a failure in the plan, there should be a backup plan, and then a backup to the backup plan. I like having plans hat are at least 2 and sometimes 3 levels deep.

Video about stockpiling food, ammo and fishing supplies.


Lets take fishing as an example, I am stockpiling fishing gear for perch, bass and catfish. With trotlines and jugs I can have hooks in the water 24/7, and not “just” when I am standing on the bank with my rod. Recently I have been setting out some trotlines to test my survival plans and my gear. I learned that the hooks that I bought were too small for some of the catfish.
On a couple of trotlines some big catfish got on the hook, bent the hook enough to get off, and I was left with nothing to eat. The next time I went to the sporting goods store I bought larger hooks. Now its just a matter of getting back out on the river, and testing the new hooks.
Over the years I have learned that there are lots of different types of survivalist.
There are the people that have no real plans or supplies, their only real plain is to stand there with their hand out asking for help.
There are the bug out survivalist, their plans are to bug out to the wilderness and live off the land.
There are the beans and bullets. These types of people focus on stockpiling a narrow range of supplies, which is mainly bullets along with rice and beans in mylar bags.
There are the radical survivalist, that think the government is out to them. These types bask in the idea of stockpiling weapons and ammo for the coming war with the federal government.
The rural survivalist, someone that might live in a rural area on a small farm.
The isolationist, the survivalist that tries to cut all ties with modern world. These types of people may try to live off the “grid”.
The prepper, someone who checks their supplies from time to time.
The modern survivalist, someone who uses modern technology to make their survival plans.


One a certain forum that shall not be named, a member did not even have electricity in their house. They had solar panels that they used to run light bulbs. But for internet, the husband and wife went to a local coffee shop and used the free wi-fi. It kinda stuck me as odd that someone would not have electricity in their house, but would drive to a coffee shop.


A certain individual I knew back in the 1980s knocked holes in every wall of his house, and then put a firearm in the wall. He thought the federal government was after him, and he wanted a firearm within reach when the government raided his house. As fat as I know, 25 years later the guy has never been arrested or bothered by the government. This individual is what I consider a radical survivalist.


Its easy to get wrapped up in a conspiracy theory, but do not let them consume your life. Just because there might be a video on youtube about something, take it with a grain of salt.


Well rounded survival plans

To have a well rounded survival plan, its important to look at more then just stockpiling a certain few items. What about sanitation, personal hygiene, places for people to sleep, ability to cook for a group of people, having a secure bug out location, stockpiling hand soap, tooth brushes and toothpaste for people that might use your house as a bug out location.
When your looking at stockpiling food, do you take the extended family into consideration?



There was a question on the forum about stockpiling rice for SHTF, and how much rice we are planning for each person for 1 year. My reply was:
As for “per person”, I can not plan like that. I do not know how many of my kids and grandkids will show up needing food.
My wife has 3 grown children that live locally, and then we have 8 grandkids through those 3 grown kids. If I said 50 pounds of rice per person, that would be 5 X 50, or 250 pounds of rice for my wife, myself, and 3 grown kids, then another X amount of rice for the grandkids.


With those numbers, your talking an easy 300 or 400 pounds of rice. I just do not have “that” much room that I can dedicate to just rice.


I would like to have 100 – 150 pounds of rice stored in mylar bags. I think that is a reasonable number.
Survivalist need to look past the end of their noses, and consider more then just “their” needs. The needs of children, grandkids, parents, brothers, sisters, and maybe even aunts, uncles and cousins should also be planned for.


Financial survival





There are a lot of survivalist that say “once the SHTF, I am never coming home.” Then a flood or tornado destroys their house and they have to start all over again. There is a greater chance of a home being destroyed, then some kind of new plague breaking out.

After Hurricane Ike hit southeast Texas, a lot of people were caught off guard. Places in south Houston, Orange, and Bridge City that never flooded got several feet of storm surge. There were lots of families that did not have flood insurance, and had to rebuild with their own money. Protect your investments, protect your home and protect your family.


A home is not just an investment, but as a lot of people have forgotten, its a place to raise your family. A persons home is their castle, its a place they should feel secure and safe.


After a flood, hurricane, tornado,,,, protect your investment with some good insurance. That way your family can rebuild, and have a place to call their own.


Bugging out to the Wilderness

My personal opinion, I consider survivalist that plan on bugging out to the wilderness to be the least prepared. These types of people (but not all of them) usually do not test their plans, nor has very much thought been put into the plans.


Back in the mid-1990s I had a buddy whos long term survival plan was to drive about 400 – 500 miles to an out of state national forest. In that unexplored territory, he and his family was going to setup camp and wait for the disaster to pass. Another buddy of mine and I finally talked the guy of of such foolish plans. From there, the three of us started making some solid plans.


Its better to have a remote camp, or some kind of bug out location setup, then to plan on bugging out to the wilderness and living out of a tent. At least with private property you own that land, and nobody can take it from you. With public property, anyone can lay claim to it in a SHTF situation.


This video discusses the concept of bugging out to the wilderness with no tested survival skills and no real life experience.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,395 Posts
Well, I know I'm not as well rounded as I should be.

To me, planning and learning about survive is like opening a door, and then suddenly you see 5 more and they lead to 10 more and on and on!

It's very daunting at best.
 

·
Green Eggs and Spam
Joined
·
5,071 Posts
...
But to have a balanced channel and blog, I think one should cover a wide range of topics. It seems that example videos and articles work best. Instead of saying what people should do, I show people what I am doing, and end it with that. Then let the viewer make up their own mind.
I have been dirt poor most of my life.

I have learned to do without...

I have learned to adapt, overcome, and continue on ... with next to nothing. There has always been a way to be a real McGyver in every situation... but it might take hours or days in real life.

I am certainly lacking a few skills that you have. However, I have found that I can compliment the skill-set of others I am around.

I don't really know where I fit into your list. I'm more like Taco Bell, I think outside the box ... er bun...:upsidedown:
 

·
Sua Sponte
Joined
·
976 Posts
What was the point of this article?

You just seemed to be rambling.

By the way, you should add 'food preservation' in that list of things you might need to do at the six month mark. My personal suspicion is that lots of people have skipped that step in their food plan.

YMMV,
Chad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
I agree that a BOL is far superior to the public wilderness plan but your quote " At least with private property you own that land, and nobody can take it from you. With public property, anyone can lay claim to it in a SHTF situation." is a little misleading isn't it? No one can take it from you? Are we still talking SHTF? I got news for you Kev, in a SHTF situation opsec will be very important. other than that I like your ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
What was the point of this article?

You just seemed to be rambling.

By the way, you should add 'food preservation' in that list of things you might need to do at the six month mark. My personal suspicion is that lots of people have skipped that step in their food plan.

YMMV,
Chad
We have a lot of newbies on here lately (myself included), and Kev is addressing a well-rounded survival plan. It's not EVERYTHING we need to do, but it gives a great overview.

I really do enjoy everything I have found on here about food preservation, though. You are right that it's very important.

BTW, it's kind of gutsy to tell the guy who makes this whole website possible that he's rambling. :taped:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,942 Posts
I wish I could afford to be more well rounded. I have a few months worth of food, guns, fishing gear, garden tools etc but there is room for more. I have been trying to round out my knowlege which is often free thanks to kev, the board and it's contributors and I thank all 3.

I for one love the fishing videos. I was raised fishing either from shore with a worm or a minnow or we trolled the river with a lure. We fished for bass or crappie and thats pretty much it unless we happened to be going to the shore. I never intentionally caught a catfish until this summer when I had some chicken liver (from my home grown and butchered chickens) and decided I wanted to have my kids catch something a bit bigger than a blue gill at the local pond.

I am told that since trot lines are "unsporting" they are illegeal here but I am not far from the WV border and I'd bet that trotlines are legal there and want to try it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
Here in El Paso, Texas we have a particular problem with water supply.

So my water plan is:

1. Large storage of drinking water, with a large capacity storage of tap water.
2. Backup 1, Dehumidifier to produce grey water and a distillation device with solar burner to distill it. The dehumidifier will run off a solar power system.
3. Backup 2, A bucket system on my bike, I will ride my bike down to the rio grande (I can get to a section that has not come into contact with Mexico yet and is still in New Mexico flowing south) and I will ride it up to my house and distill it or boil it.
4. Backup 3, I will distill my own urine and waste water.

Another consideration is that in El Paso you do not bug out because you will die.
 

·
To secure peace is to...
Joined
·
4,194 Posts
Stockpiles are good for surviving acute disasters: job loss, injury, time off work, small natural disasters, etc. Stockpiles also give you "x" months of buffer.

HOWEVER, a true survivalist needs to be heading towards sustainability: Gardens, orchards, livestock, energy, firewood, dirt.

To me, it is all about identifying and listing the most likely threats one may encounter. Start at the top of the list and check those items off first and continue working down the list over time.
 

·
Outdoorsman and Hunter
Joined
·
1,177 Posts
I agree that a BOL is far superior to the public wilderness plan but your quote " At least with private property you own that land, and nobody can take it from you. With public property, anyone can lay claim to it in a SHTF situation." is a little misleading isn't it? No one can take it from you? Are we still talking SHTF? I got news for you Kev, in a SHTF situation opsec will be very important. other than that I like your ideas.
Be careful with this line of thought. Private property exists because we have a Constitution that protects private property and courts/laws to enforce it. In a total SHTF private property, especially land may "belong" to the person with the biggest gang and most guns.

Personally I am a semi-rounded survivalists. I have a reasonable amount of gear and food, but no rural land and definitely not off the grid. Therefore in a total collapse with roving bands of raiders I am probably in trouble, even with my guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,430 Posts
I've got about 4 months worth of food; a few thousand rounds of various ammo calibers; water filtration up to 24k gallons; I'm working on large scale water storage this fall.

It doesn't matter how much food and material you have prepped, if you aren't prepared to live like the pioneers and build or make it yourself, then you are not ready for the worst that can happen.

I'll have 17 fruit trees in the ground by December, another dozen blackberries, raspberries, gooseberries, currants, hardy kiwis. I'll be learning to propagate grapes and muscadines this fall. I've got 7 species of bamboo for food and building material. I'm planning on willow for light construction and weaving. I'm trying to learn as much as I can about permaculture, because at some point there will be a major crunch with regards to water availability.

Lots of stuff stored is nice, but it is only the beginning. You have to be able to replace what is stored with your own production.
 

·
Seeking Knowledge
Joined
·
216 Posts
There was a question on the forum about stockpiling rice for SHTF, and how much rice we are planning for each person for 1 year. My reply was:
Survivalist need to look past the end of their noses, and consider more then just “their” needs. The needs of children, grandkids, parents, brothers, sisters, and maybe even aunts, uncles and cousins should also be planned for.
So very true. If you are not willing to turn someone away then you had better make sure to be ready for them.

However. Your financial needs and your immediate group/family should be locked down before moving in to the "might show up category". The decision may be tough but it might just be better that extended family doesn't think of you as someone to run to if things get rough.
 

·
Not playing games
Joined
·
1,332 Posts
Man, you gotta love Texans.
Not Texas, that's some of the worst real-estate I have ever seen, but the people are excellent.

All I have is a couple of guns, about 100 rounds (not counting target-ammo) a couple months of food, some PMs and a 2-part BOB that is comparable to the best stuff I have seen here.

But I'm not thinking in terms of "bugging out", but rather joining with individuals in my own area to withstand and rebound from what is coming.
Won't be easy, we are about as isolated from any source of oil or iron as you can find in the lower 48, but food and water are okay and the game is so abundant that it's getting to be a pest-control problem.
Now, if only I could get that idea for a steam-truck to work....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,395 Posts
ramble on!!!
Absolutley!

I've never understood this. People put together top quality threads like this one together, spend lots of time putting it together and there is little doubt many will benifit from it, and then someone say's something stupid and completely unnessesary.

If ya don't like it or don't understand it...MOVE ON!!!

I just don't get it!:confused:
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top