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50/50……I’m more interested in developing skills than stocking but do a little of both.
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I’m probably preaching to the choir here but I’ve really become convinced that some extended time outdoors (in whatever weather - I live in Wisconsin) is really necessary for good health. Up until last year, I homeschooled all my children and we spent a good part of every outdoors if we can. This year my youngest is in “regular” school and he has been exhausted lately. I started to look at his diet (school food is notoriously awful) and adjust that by supplementing our good homemade food in a lunchbox. But then I started thinking about how much time he (and almost all youth in high school) spends indoors. Most of every single day. No wonder…..

This morning I ran across this site online talking about humanely raised animals for food and I screenshot this particular item where they equate access to outdoors and pasture with animal health and happiness. I can attest that my chickens and ducks race out the door every morning when I open it to spend the entire day outside foraging, taking dust baths, taking regular baths (ducks) and sleeping in the sunshine. They wait until the last available moment to go in at night (we actually clap at the ducks and they have been trained to know it’s time to go in). In almost any weather.….last week when we had snow, I had duck tracks covering most of our 2 acres around our house within an hour of letting them out. They had no interest in staying inside their coop - and they have a pretty nice warm, roomy coop.

So if it’s humane and healthy for our animals to get outdoors, why do we keep ourselves and children indoors so much? I realize we all have work and school that dictates a lot of our time. However, I know if I spend too much time indoors and don’t use my free time doing something outside, my mental and physical health goes downhill quickly. And in Wisconsin, getting outdoors can be challenging (-20 F + whatever windchill the winter likes to bring) but I find if I bundle up and brave the elements, I’m healthier all around. Just something to remember on these short, dark winter days. (still working on getting more fresh air for the family in general:). Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!
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I think it affects some people more than others.

I get SAD if I do not go outside almost every day, and by the end of winter I get it anyways. The way that I see it, our ancestors lived an outside life for millions of years, and so some people have trouble adapting to the less-bright light inside
Affects my wife, that’s for sure. Short winter days, daylight savings time. She’s an accountant, staring at a computer all day. In winter, she goes outside to drive to work, and then again to drive home.
 

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I Seen A Sighting!
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I've noticed when I'm ill with something---doesn't matter what---if I can go sit in the sun for a while, it does do something to help me feel better. May be totally psychosomatic, but I figure it doesn't matter even if it is. If you feel better, even only in your mind, it's worth doing.

Turn your face to the sun in the fall and winter and early spring. Eyes closed, of course. See if it helps. It always makes my eyeballs feel good to have my eyes closed while facing the sun, if that makes sense.

But yeah, I agree, I think we as living creatures should be outside more than we are. Think of it, for many of us it wasn't that long ago that our grandparents and great grandparents spent a good portion of their days outside working, doing chores, caring for gardens and just enjoying sitting outside doing nothing.
 

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Purrpared
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I'm studying Georgian England for a book I'm researching and there was a medical school of thought that recommended everyone take a one-hour walk either in nature, or in a park if they lived in London, every day except Sunday - because on Sundays you would be walking to church and in the park anyway. People at the time commented how much more "hopeful, cheerful and hardy" they felt compared to acquaintances who were driven everywhere and continually wore thin shoes or slippers not suitable for walking.

I need to imitate them every morning. Years ago I lived by a park and during a particularly bad time in my life I started walking there every morning when I got off work. It was a mile around the park, and I slept so well it was amazing. Gonna go for a walk and leave my phone off, too. Thanks for the extra nudge!
 

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Indefatigable
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There is a reason many religions and philosophies advise prayer/meditation at sunup and sundown, outdoors whenever possible. It truly does make a huge difference in your day if you can sit quietly outside, especially at those times, for even a few minutes.
 

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I remember after getting out of rehab, I realized how much time I wasted indoors. I still lived in town, so I took up cross country skiing and skijoring and lil dog sledding, hiking and shooting in the summer. All working towards our goal of owning our lil hobby farm.
Now on the farm, I never spend any time indoors. Winter does limit my time outdoors, but I get out to do chores, at least. I’m getting back into skijoring/cross country skiing this year.
I love feeding and talking to my farm animals, pigs, cattle, chickens, cats and of coarse our the Girls (3 huskies).
I love being outside, hot, cold doesn’t matter. It just makes me feel good.
Cut, Hauled, loaded, unloaded, two 15’ trailer full of ash logs, today. Good times.
 

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I'm in Wisconsin too.

No doubt working outside, especially moving rocks / splitting wood, things like that...is like therapy and just makes me feel good. I just don't have the lifestyle to do it that much.

Oddly, I would say being outside working on the tractor, or chainsaw-ing, I don't feel quite the same.
 

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Yup
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I go on a kayaking trip every year with a doctor. i asked him this year what is going on with all of these kids being allergic to peanuts. We didn't have a single kid when I was growing up. He said it's because they don't play outside. That was my thought too before I asked him.
 

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Indefatigable
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I go on a kayaking trip every year with a doctor. i asked him this year what is going on with all of these kids being allergic to peanuts. We didn't have a single kid when I was growing up. He said it's because they don't play outside. That was my thought too before I asked him.
I was out of the house doing chores every morning before sunup and in the summer we were gone all day riding bikes or horses. On weekends we camped. As my dad liked to remind me, as a kid he spent double the time I did outdoors. Funny all that outdoor time didn't cure my deadly allergy to nuts or my dad's allergy to strawberries.
 

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I have never liked being indoors much ,most happy outside. I am 100% happier being a farmer than before sitting in a office . Our animals go out every day ( stay out in summer) except when it is pouring rain and cold ( goats don;t like being wet) or it's really cold and snowing
So yes, great post, absolutely. I think that's probably part of why the population in the US is so unhealthy, too much time spent indoors and sitting.
 

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Padre in the woods
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I think that's probably part of why the population in the US is so unhealthy, too much time spent indoors and sitting.
Too much processed or fake food. Missing normal exercise and calorie burn. And not purpose in life. A lot of people will put aside what they should be doing for those things that take their mind off doing that which promotes a healthy lifestyle.
 

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Too much processed or fake food. Missing normal exercise and calorie burn. And not purpose in life. A lot of people will put aside what they should be doing for those things that take their mind off doing that which promotes a healthy lifestyle.
Oh yes, the fake food is definitely part of it too. I noticed that especially when we traveled in the past , food in most other countries taste better and is less processed. just the bread here is terrible ( the white mushy stuff), apples don't even smell like apples, and meat tastes and smells terrible from the store ( we grow our own, so we know) , store eggs are pale and smell fishy, and some processed foods don't even resemble food at all
 

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Moderator, floor sweeper, guardian of dust bunnies
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I try to take in healthy doses of "Nature's Prescription" as often as I reasonably can and take a break by spending some time walking in the woods.

The Japanese call it shinrin-yoku.

National Geographic said it best. Taking a walk in the woods or anywhere in natural surroundings is a...
"physiological and psychological exercise called shinrin-yoku (“forest bathing” or “taking in the forest atmosphere”). The purpose was twofold: to offer an eco-antidote to tech-boom burnout and to inspire people to reconnect with and protect the country’s forests."
A quick internet search may surprise you. A cascade of physical and mental benefits abound when we are exposed to natural sights and smells. Some of the same benefits can be had even when we look at a picture of unspoiled nature, or smell certain odors such as pine needle, balsam fir needle, and other pure essential oils made from trees.

So, I know what to do when I am tied down at my desk and cannot run away like the wild child I want to be. Just looking at a picture of my favorite natural places and sprinkling a few drops of pine needle oil in my diffuser calms me down instantly...

This has been demonstrated to reduce blood pressure and have a calming effect on many people. Yes, it works!
 
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