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Happy to be here!
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5,615 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw there was an “Absolutely do NOT buy this product” thread. Let’s do a gear thread on survival items you have extensively field tested and turned out to be a fantastic buy. The idea being to save prospective buyers the pain of trial and error we had to go through. Please include the cost of the reviewed item, how you tested it and a picture or link. Please do not post reviews of gear that you haven't spent a lot of time in the field with (AKA "unboxing" or "table-top" reviews):mad:.

I’ll start. Here’s a link to my $8 Tramontina 14” Bolo machete…

http://www.survival-pax.com/Tramont...cMVmSt6pRtVEDcQAzajCGsW9EqKLZ5uu8uBoC-G7w_wcB

I went through quite a discovery process finding this gem. I've spend a whole lot more on large choppers for camping, but didn’t get a better tool. I bought it over a year ago and have taken it on several hiking and camping trips. I’ve also used it extensively on my 10 acre wooded Florida property for clearing brush. I prefer a 24” Tramontina machete for farm and home work, and the 14” for backpacking, but in the interest of field testing it I‘ve used the 14" mostly this year. It’s a great chopping blade for clearing trails, building shelters or processing firewood at a camp site. For a fairly light weight chopper you can fit inside a day pack, you won’t be disappointed with the Tramontina 14” Bolo. I’d go as far as say that if I had to pick one blade to survive in Florida with, this would be it.
 

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Come and Take Them!
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3,133 Posts
RedHead Steering Gears in Auburn, WA. For those with heavy duty trucks. Went through 3 auto parts boxes for my 2007 Ram 3500, each had over 1" play in steering. RedHead solved the problem, and truck is enjoyable to drive again. :thumb:
 

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Outlander Territory
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3,710 Posts
I'm going to suggest the Solo wood-burning stove or a similar product. It came recommended to me by another member of this site (Biathlon) and it simply doesn't fail. It really is the most reliable, easy to start, easy to maintain stove out there. I never need worry about cooking or boiling water with this thing as a small pile of 2" sticks, grass, pine cones, pine needles or dry cow poop will burn and heat whatever you need. No moving or fiddly parts to break or maintain...will last forever if you don't run it over with the tractor.

Links as requested:

Solo Stove: http://www.amazon.com/Solo-Stove-Lite-Compact-Backpacking/dp/B007DBD3IU/ref=sr_1_4?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1454708621&sr=1-4&keywords=solo+stove
Solo Pot 900 (stove fits perfectly inside it):
 

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Currently surviving SHTF
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2,485 Posts
CRKT M-16 series folders.

Mine is the M16-14T. Built like a tank. The lock is the strongest I've owned. Even with the titanium scales it is a bit hefty.

Holds an edge forever. Could probably double duty as a prybar, but I don't want to subject it to that kind of abuse..

http://www.crkt.com/M16-14-Titanium-Tanto-AutoLAWKS-Combo-Edge
 

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Crazy
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5,609 Posts
The ken onion work work sharp edge system. I am the type of guy that with some time and a wet stone I can **** up a knife blade to the point its not repairable. But when I got this I can get anything razor Sharpe. I shaved with my wifes 9in kitchen knife. There was a lot more blood then what I would have of liked but damn its a close shave.
 

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statists' be statin'
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3,441 Posts
Yo-Yo Automatic Fishing Reels and Snare Traps. I've been experimenting with both for a while.

They are relatively cheap and inexpensively made. The concepts are very simple. There's really nothing spectacular about them except that they do exactly what they are supposed to do and do it well.

You can set up a few Yo-Yo Reels and a few snares, go do other important things, and come back the next morning and your lunch is waiting for you on the end of the line already tired out from the fight.

I'm lucky to be in a rural wooded area where food is plentiful if you're able to go into the woods to get it. In a situation where I really needed to survive on my own labor, there would be a lot of tasks to complete every day. Hunting and fishing take up a lot of time.
 

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Living the dream:-)
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1,620 Posts
I would say Mini Sawyer water filters
Good to know I just got one new for free and wanted to test it out.
My must buy I think everyone has probably heard of is an SOL space blanket. Makes a world of difference in cold. And it's extremely compact. Also north face's Terra series backpack has worked great for me over the last few years. Mine is the Terra 30 which is no longer made but the others in the Terra series seem just as well made. Another great buy was my Leatherman rebar. I have carried it everyday for 2+years. Use it almost daily. Only complaint it the belt pouch is wearing thru. But I guess when you're using something everyday it'll wear
 

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Remove Kebab
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3,589 Posts
I installed a Surefire DG Switch on my P229R last year after a nighttime encounter where I had my German Shepherd on a leash. I could not activate my Surefire X200 easily with one hand. This thing is comfortable and works perfectly. I will never have a weapon light without a remote again.

http://www.surefire.com/dg-remote-tailcap-switch-x-series.html
 

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Outlander Territory
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3,710 Posts
I prefer the full size. It flows better, so better for use in line or gravity, lasts a lot longer between backflushes, and lasts a lot longer overall.

The penalty is an ounce of weight, a bit larger in size, and about $20 or so in cost.

Az
$19 for the Mini at Walmart, $29 for the Regular. Just saw them both yesterday locally.
 

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Solo Survivor
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241 Posts
I will add the Sven Saw, www.svensaw.com I picked up the 15" for $35 and used it cutting up firewood and shelter materials, combined with a small axe or good hatchet and your all set. extremely easy to pack inside your pack or strap to the outside. even comes with a strip of leather that protects the bits on the blade.

Got one in the pack and plan to pick up a couple more.
 

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Registered
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1,001 Posts
The Katydyn gravity filter. The most convenient for back packing. Fill it, hang and use as needed. When you are ready to break camp. Fill or top off all of your containers with clean water and dispose of any left over. It is almost like having clean running tap water at your campsite.
 

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Renaissance Man
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7,503 Posts
The Katydyn gravity filter. The most convenient for back packing. Fill it, hang and use as needed. When you are ready to break camp. Fill or top off all of your containers with clean water and dispose of any left over. It is almost like having clean running tap water at your campsite.
I use the Sawyer the same way. Installed inline between the bladder and the valve, the bladder is dirty water, spigot is clean and can be used with an on/off switch like a faucet in camp.

The beauty comes while on the move. Fill up the bladder and go. Drinking from the hose gives you clean water. No screwing around with pumping, squeezing, dripping, filtering, or boiling. Just fill and go.

Az
 

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Registered
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7,911 Posts
I want to add a +1 to the SOL blankets and Bivvies. They are an INCREDIBLE improvement over the old "space blanket". From their construction to the storage packaging, they are well made and well thought out. And they work GREAT.

I also want to put in my support of the "Techlite Lumen Master" flashlights. They are available from Costco and such in three packs. They are a small tac lite that fits easy in your hand, take some abuse (I have dropped them onto the driveway and such many times), and work really well. I bought a pack years ago for $20 at Costco and after testing them went back and bought several more packs. They are all over my house, in my kits, and even members of my MAG have bought them. They are awesome.

http://www.amazon.com/Techlite-Lumen-Master-High-Intensity-Flashlight/dp/B0074D6PE6
 
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