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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Once a year, at minimum, I take my BOB and perform a basic drill. A good idea for all, as practice helps ensure proper execution when it really matters. last Tuesday I exfiltrated to the point farthest from any town I could in one day (from the time I left, to sundown). Woke up around 10am, rolled right out of bed, threw on my loaded tac-vest with a jacket over it, grabbed my BOB and my AK. Grabbed an extra bottle of water from the fridge and hit the road.

First I made my way out of my home and the village I live in as discretely as possible. It is still classified as a village by the state as we have no established businesses and less than 40 residents/26 houses.

Next I headed to the woods, a 1/4 mile walk from the road. Being aware of the terrain I was able to move unnoticed as far as I can tell. Ill ask the neighbors if they saw me tomorrow. Once in the woods I began my hike to my hide. About 23 miles and 8 hours later I arrived. Note, if I had been walking in a straight line with no regard to what I was doing I would have made the trip in about 5 1/2 hours. But, in keeping with the task at hand, my goal was to get there as unnoticeable as possible. Which involved changing vectors repeatedly to slow anyone tracking me, aswell as holding positions and checking ahead with my scope.

After fording 3 streams, treating one small cut to my arm, and warding off a stray dog, I got to my hide. After securing the area I made camp. This is where my BOB gear came into play. I set up 3 trip flares, In this situation I used the lightstick trip flare system I got out of a CheaperThanDirt catalogue. It is a stamped piece of sheet metal that holds a lightstick, and has a spring-loaded arm which snaps the the lightstick and activates it once the tripwire is disturbed. Next I set up a simple shelter, which was a brown tarp draped over a branch which was supported off the ground at one end by another branch. (looked like a pup tent/lean-to)

Next I set 3 snares (yes I like 3's) and promptly had 2 rabbits, which I stewed. Mixed in a few wild potatoes, some ginger root, and some wild-berries (raspberries and blackberries) The fire I built was done so using my magnesium firestarter (with the mag. block that ya scrape, pile the filings, and ignite with the integral spark-steel flint) After filtering, boiling, then tablet-type purifying, I replenished my water supply from a nearby stream. By this time, the sun had set, and the night chill had set in. I put out the fire (to avoid detection, and prevent any accidents) and made up my bedroll.

After laying awake, mind racing through various scenarios, hypotheticals, what ifs, and why nots, for nearly 2 hours, I finally fell asleep. After sleeping for about 6 hours, waking up at 6am to my watch alarm, I broke down camp, gathered my supplies, and at about 7, having had coffee and an MRE for breakfast headed back. Utilizing the same mental mindset I made my way back to my home to evaluate the performance of myself and my gear. All In all for being a totally simulated situation It went extremely well.

Anyone serious about being prepared, should consider doing something like this. Take one weekend to practice techniques and skills which would be used in the event that SHTF, atleast once a year, if not once every 3-4 months. Not only does it give you an idea of how you perform physically, but helps you determine what items you do and may not, need to carry.

In addition I'd like to hear what the rest of you do to practice and/or test yourselves aswell as your equipment.
 

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Hitch Hiking Guide
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nice post! I do this as well. The last time I did it, me and my buddies were going on an overnight canoe trip. Instead of packing for it, I just grabbed my BOB and went, figure I would learn a little about what I needed and didnt need. I learned some valuable stuff, that I hadn't really thought of before, for example:

after tipping the canoe over (maybe a little too much beer lol), I found that lighters (although they will dry out) should still be kept in zip lock bags. Because if they are more than a little wet they generally wont light until dried.

alittle more 550 cord would've been helpful in setting up camp.

just little things you will learn about your set-up that makes you feel that much more confident in it. speaking of which, its getting chilly now... time to change the clothes in the BOB lol be right back... ;)
 

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This is a great subject, and not often actually done. I have run a couple of different "scenarios" over the last few years to test out my gear, as well as myself. My favorite was getting home from work, no car (simulating EMP or some other reason I couldnt use my car) and carrying my BOB/Get home bag. Learned a lot about the area I live/work, about my footwear, and what I didnt need.
I also live within 25 miles of a Nuke Plant, as well as trains that pass right by my house, so I have practiced with the kids getting out and safe in case of a derailment (has happened right by where I work 3 times in the last 4 years).

Bottom line, PRACTICE your skills, plans, and supplies.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
1:53am, Sunday Oct 12. Just got home after a three day BugOut. Not an official duck and cover event, just another little test, changed my tactics, took a more direct route, covered about 57 miles, in 19 hours of walking (one way with a nap after 13 hours, and a full sleep after the next 6 hours of walking and food catch/prep/camp setup and take-down). Traveling through heavy timber/countryside, I was still able to manage almost 3mph. (4mph is pretty quick walk) A quick heated stream-water bath and the change of clothes I had packed gave a huge morale boost, and even in my bugout mindset I actually enjoyed the challenge. Since I brought it up... Heating stream water was done as so: 1- I dug a pit large enough to hold a few gallons of water with my e-tool (folding mil-issue shovel). I lined it with the heavy plastic sheeting I use as a ground cover (standard white, translucent but not transparent utility sheeting sold in large rolls at Menards) Pit was shallow but long/wide enough to sit up in indian style. Next to it about a foot away I dug another pit, about 10 inches deep, and two feet around. In the smaller/deeper pit, I built a fire, as I hadn't had one during the night, and into this fire I placed a few large stones from the stream. Stones were anywhere from baseball sized to 30cal Ammo can sized. As the stones were heating, I made a mat by weaving Weeping Willow branches together, the mat was about 3 feet square. Once complete I trenched the gap between the stream and my lined pool and allowed the stream to fill it, then closed off the trench. I laid my willow mat into the now filled pool, on top of the plastic liner, and then placed the heated stones onto the mat. The stones heat the water, the mat protects the plastic, the plastic minimizes the amount of dirt in your bathwater. After checking the water temp and removing the stones, by simply lifting out the mat, I bathed. A nice hot-ish, bath in semi-clear stream water in the middle of the woods after 19 hours of hiking and a fresh change of clothes/socks. It was fantastic!

I was able to get one large squirrel and one medium sized rabbit the night before (after cleaning, the meat was placed in a zip-lock bag, and submerged in the stream to keep it cool and fresh) and made a lovely stew with wild potatoes, ginger and the like.
The next morning, I started my return journey, walked 13 hours, got a full sleep, and finished the return in 7 more hours.
Again my gear performed admirably.

1 MOLLE pack with frame
1 tarp for shelter
30 feet of cordage
1 plastic ground cover-sheet
3 wire snares
3 trip-flares
2 canteens and 2 bottles of drinking water.
1 water filtration pump and purification drops
1 Raider Bowie
1 folding knife
2 MREs
1 firekit and firstaid kit
1 change of clothes, including socks (very important, gotta take care of those feet if you're going to walk any distance!)

Total Trip Distance 114 miles! Time, approx 39 hours, averaging 3mph cross-country. Not bad for a chunk! ** does the truffle shuffle **

Aside from some poison ivy on my leg I came out on top... Now I'm off for a proper shower, the last of my stew, and to check the mail!
 

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"Fast Mover"
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Not to be rude, but I don't believe you.

Pointblank
 

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it tickles dont it
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Not to be rude, but I don't believe you.

Pointblank
well i can beat that Ive done 30 miles in 6 hours with 175lbs in 120f heat,and Im 56yrs old and 280lbs!;):D:
sorry had to!


Its the net, if he is blowing smoke those that have BTDT already see it, the only people in awe are those who have yet to do anything remotely close to it!
Heck, on this recent southern forum hike deal that i went to do here, a lot of folks got woke up to gear issues, their physical issue and the likes. Then again they are a small minority compared to the thousands of ga/fla guys that post stuff like above but didn't show for one excuse or another. Always make's you wonder when you start reading what they say they are and what they can do:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
lol well of course you are all free and welcome to your own opinions... but, you fail to state what actually is the unbelievable part, which makes it appear as though you simply want to cause problems... which is sad. 3mph is an easily maintainable speed for nearly anyone not with cane or walker. As for how I can do that... what's that called? oh yeah, that "walking". It is a simple feat for anyone who chooses atleast a semi-active lifestyle. Thanks to the fact that I spent months at a time durring my summer vacations, back in my schoolboy days, with my grandmother in Montana, and was exposed at a young age to hiking, Ive grown fond of it. Granted, in this day and age, the youth of today are typically lazy, spoiled, and addicted to their tvs and video games. Which make make it a unbelievable task for such people. But if a person were to simply walk 5-6 miles every 2-3 days, they'd be amazed at what they can do. Personally, I like to challange myself physically. Go hiking, kyaking, canoing, rock climbing, or hell, just get up and walk more than 20 feet, it works wonders! ;)
 

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Mountain Critter
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Good topic. Yes, I get out and do similar exercises, both in the summer and in the snow, on skis. Always do an overnight snow cave campout several times each winter.

I don't find anything unbelievable about the walking speed/distance covered part of your story, for someone who is fit and gets out and hikes regularly. And yes, everyone would benefit from making a habit of covering distance on foot, and generally focusing a bit more on staying fit. Good points you made.

Got to say though, I've had a good bit of experience with snares, but can't say I've ever had the good fortune to snare anything, let alone two rabbits, "promptly," just in time for dinner! Nor do I understand why you had to filter, boil, AND chemically purify your drinking water.

What say you?
 

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STALKER Unit Mobile
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hmmm alright I see where i messed up I do apologize on that my math had been off and also just the entire distance seemed off to me I guess
 

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it tickles dont it
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lol well of course you are all free and welcome to your own opinions... but, you fail to state what actually is the unbelievable part, which makes it appear as though you simply want to cause problems... which is sad. 3mph is an easily maintainable speed for nearly anyone not with cane or walker. As for how I can do that... what's that called? oh yeah, that "walking". It is a simple feat for anyone who chooses atleast a semi-active lifestyle. Thanks to the fact that I spent months at a time durring my summer vacations, back in my schoolboy days, with my grandmother in Montana, and was exposed at a young age to hiking, Ive grown fond of it. Granted, in this day and age, the youth of today are typically lazy, spoiled, and addicted to their tvs and video games. Which make make it a unbelievable task for such people. But if a person were to simply walk 5-6 miles every 2-3 days, they'd be amazed at what they can do. Personally, I like to challange myself physically. Go hiking, kyaking, canoing, rock climbing, or hell, just get up and walk more than 20 feet, it works wonders! ;)

hey leave the x-box, and chessy poofs and the lack of activity out of this ok:D:
oh wait. ill make the excuse many have " im storing extra fat so i wont die ..."
 

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Good post, Squirrel.
I made a thread like this a couple of weeks ago, stressing the importance of actual training with your BOB and your family.
There was a minor local incident in my region a couple of days ago that had a few people worried, and I was able to learn if the BOB and family were ready or not.
I'd recommend that people do as many run throughs as they can, and also alter their lifestyle to more one of camping and hiking in as close to BOB load as possible, rather than mall trolling and football watching. Benifit all around.
 

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The Hammer & Anvil
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This is a great way to see whats what. I recently purchased a blackwater 3 day pack. I have not been out in the woods or hiking since the days of orienteering in ROTC so it should be a pretty hard shakedown for me.

I am not sure considering my area how far I would hike it, albeit I am in a semi rural area their is no real place to go, it is more of a bug in situation for me, but plans are in the works for a location thats next best just in case. Until then plenty of state parks in my area to hike in to test the gear and my body.

Thanks for the post showing a little effort goes a long way.
 

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"Fast Mover"
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1:53am, Sunday Oct 12. Just got home after a three day BugOut. Not an official duck and cover event, just another little test, changed my tactics, took a more direct route, covered about 57 miles, in 19 hours of walking (one way with a nap after 13 hours, and a full sleep after the next 6 hours of walking and food catch/prep/camp setup and take-down). Traveling through heavy timber/countryside, I was still able to manage almost 3mph. (4mph is pretty quick walk) A quick heated stream-water bath and the change of clothes I had packed gave a huge morale boost, and even in my bugout mindset I actually enjoyed the challenge. Since I brought it up... Heating stream water was done as so: 1- I dug a pit large enough to hold a few gallons of water with my e-tool (folding mil-issue shovel). I lined it with the heavy plastic sheeting I use as a ground cover (standard white, translucent but not transparent utility sheeting sold in large rolls at Menards) Pit was shallow but long/wide enough to sit up in indian style. Next to it about a foot away I dug another pit, about 10 inches deep, and two feet around. In the smaller/deeper pit, I built a fire, as I hadn't had one during the night, and into this fire I placed a few large stones from the stream. Stones were anywhere from baseball sized to 30cal Ammo can sized. As the stones were heating, I made a mat by weaving Weeping Willow branches together, the mat was about 3 feet square. Once complete I trenched the gap between the stream and my lined pool and allowed the stream to fill it, then closed off the trench. I laid my willow mat into the now filled pool, on top of the plastic liner, and then placed the heated stones onto the mat. The stones heat the water, the mat protects the plastic, the plastic minimizes the amount of dirt in your bathwater. After checking the water temp and removing the stones, by simply lifting out the mat, I bathed. A nice hot-ish, bath in semi-clear stream water in the middle of the woods after 19 hours of hiking and a fresh change of clothes/socks. It was fantastic!

I was able to get one large squirrel and one medium sized rabbit the night before (after cleaning, the meat was placed in a zip-lock bag, and submerged in the stream to keep it cool and fresh) and made a lovely stew with wild potatoes, ginger and the like.
The next morning, I started my return journey, walked 13 hours, got a full sleep, and finished the return in 7 more hours.
Again my gear performed admirably.

1 MOLLE pack with frame
1 tarp for shelter
30 feet of cordage
1 plastic ground cover-sheet
3 wire snares
3 trip-flares
2 canteens and 2 bottles of drinking water.
1 water filtration pump and purification drops
1 Raider Bowie
1 folding knife
2 MREs
1 firekit and firstaid kit
1 change of clothes, including socks (very important, gotta take care of those feet if you're going to walk any distance!)

Total Trip Distance 114 miles! Time, approx 39 hours, averaging 3mph cross-country. Not bad for a chunk! ** does the truffle shuffle **

Aside from some poison ivy on my leg I came out on top... Now I'm off for a proper shower, the last of my stew, and to check the mail!
You either need to learn to pace count to determine proper distance or you need to stop lying.

While I was in the Army serving as a Special Operations Soldier in the 2nd Ranger Battalion I battled along side some amazing individuals.

One of these soldiers, a seasoned Special Forces soldier who served in 1st group was blessed with amazing endurance. Whenever any of the local infantry bats was hosting a official 12 mile ruck he would do it for fun.

Now a official 12 mile is: a full combat load, standard M4 carbine with all attachments, 35 pounds of gear within the ruck, and the weight of water the soldier chooses to carry.

For fun he carried a stripped m249 machine gun (instead of an m4) and a extra bullet proof plate in his ruck.

At the start he would burn everyone for the first 500 meters to get away from the pack, after this he would speed march 100 meters, jog/run 100 meters, and he would keep this up for 12 miles, this would take him just under 3 hours. An reasonable time for the 12 miles is 5 to 5 1/2 hours for a normal soldier. THIS IS ALL ON A MARKED PAVED ROAD. but you did it in forest?

You want to tell me that you are even close to his time while your going through the forest? Yet alone stopping to checking ahead with your scope, again and again? But you don't stop there, oh no, you went twice the distance!!!! and then did it again on the way home the next day!!!! Bull !!!!!!!!!!!!

Like I said I was a Ranger, and many times we had to do 12 to 15 tactical miles through the forest. It took all day! and many of us didn't have skin on the bottom of our feet once it was done. (In summer do to massive amounts of sweat. But I guess you will still stand beside your 23 TACTICAL miles through the forest at break neck speeds?!?!?!?!

You either ran around your backyard and you don't know what your talking about, or your a liar.

On top of all of it, you caught rabbits with snares on a 2/3 ratio? I've done 21 days in our Ranger survival school. There were days I set 14 snares and was lucky to have one even tripped. (tripped doesn't mean a successful catch) But your snares caught "promptly". There is nothing "prompt" about survival; its a slow up hill battle. and the only thing prompt is hunger and DEATH! Everything else is a difficult, stressful, moral destroying waiting game. Ironically waiting is not an option, its constant work, you must always be thinking, working, planning.

Now stop lying and stand down, because you ain't nothing but a "backyard bubba" because your not capable of doing such things at such speeds. And if I'm somehow wrong, you need to join the Army and volunteer to try out for DELTA. The Real Supermen.

:headshake::headshake:

Pointblank
 

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STALKER Unit Mobile
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Went for a small test run this afternoon after classes with the gear I had here on base in my Havoc series Camel back. fully loaded with the gear that I have here and also a couple weights form the gym I slipped it weighed in at 28lbs with water and all. made a 3 mile trek in 23 minutes averaging at 7.8 mph. Also found something interesting about this base I found a couple strange places in the ground here not too far off of the trail Ill have to come back to check later but asking around I found that this base used to have a tunnel system built in underneath everything to train the old army troops that were here going to Vietnam. lol I have one thing to say as well for California The hill suck when you are running lol jk.
 
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