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Lightning
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Discussion Starter #1


A friend and I started a large camping trip for our friends 3 years back. We tag teamed organizing the first year. Not long before the second year though, he died of a rare type of cancer. Before he died, we spoke about doing the trip again. Because of this, I decided to continue organizing the trip every winter for my friends, and in memory of him.

The picture above is from last weekend, the third year of the trip.

This year was interesting because it was the first year I decided to observe the entire trip, as a SHTF scenario, and test my BOB.

My room mate (who also came camping) is a prepper as well, so it was cool to bounce ideas back and forth, even if most were mental masturbation/jokes.

...

Various small items were of great use, including

*lip balm (it was cold and windy)
*coconut oil for a cut and cooking
*tweezers for a splinter
*nail clippers
*slingshot and marbles- killed a small pigeon in one shot with this. more in a second
*gloves
*merino wool clothing
*vibram five finger shoes and merino wool toe socks
*knife
*playing cards
*lifesaver ultrafiltration water bottle
*bug spray (for others, I was fine)
*various soaps/toiletries
*flashlights
*binoculars

My room mate also put his Swiss "spork" to good use, and his $50 LED fenix flashlight (I only have cheapies at the moment).

The water bottle was especially useful since I was able to drink the fresh water available on the island, when no one else could (not potable).

I could have drank that the entire time actually, but we had over 300 bottles of water so there was no shortage for the 3 days and 2 nights we were out there.

My merino wool clothing came to good use when it was in the low 40's one night. I wish I had more of it actually, and plan on getting a few more pieces over the next few months.

My Vibram five fingers held up well over the merino wool socks, but I do plan on getting the warmer model. Even living in Florida, it would be nice to have a pair that, in combination with the socks, kept my feet 100% warm, not just 75%.

I also brought pemmican on the trip. I didn't eat any, but if there was some sort of food shortage, I'm sure I could have lasted at least a week on the pemmican alone, not to mention birds/fish, and even feral hogs (had I brought my gun, which I did not).

Regarding the slingshot and bird, I actually have the entire thing on video. However, it was shot in a state park, and they warned us not to shoot any "game" while in the island. I'm probably over paranoid about it, but I have not hosted the video yet. Does anyone know more about this?

Never the less, it was a bit of a confidence booster to know that I could eat small birds with nothing more than a slingshot in a bad situation. The bird could also have been used as shark bait with the right equipment (we caught a 7 foot bull shark not 100 yards off the beach the first year).

Regarding the group, and how individuals responded throughout the trip, it was what most on here would probably expect. A few of my close friends (including the prepper, and 2 gun owners) are reliable, and would be able to take care of themselves in a SHTF situation. Most everyone else, would be a heavy burden at best, and downright dangerous to be around at worst.

This isn't to say anything about them personally, just what I observed as the person organizing the trip. Most people simply can't take care of themselves, waste supplies, and generally look for leadership anywhere but in the mirror.

But, again, it was good to see I do have friends, who are at least somewhat reliable, and can handle pressure/tough situations.

Finally, a friend and I joked about the island as a TEOTWAWKI final bug out location. At the time, we were joking, but upon further reflection, I can hardly think of anywhere better, ASSUMING, not to many other people thought of the same thing, in that type of situation.

The island has tons of fish, birds, over 60 feral pigs, and other wildlife to eat. There are freshwater wells on the island that are currently on battery power, but are in the process of being solar powered. The island is isolated, and only reachable by helicopter or boat.

The only problem I would foresee on the island are

a. too many other people having the same idea
b. hurricanes (it's right on the west coast of florida, with a high enough storm surge, not to mention wind, holy ****...)

anyway, fun time, and great learning/test experience

-Svt

ps- you can view a video of the trip here
 

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I watched the video and read your post. I just wanted to say you have youth, pretty girls, boats, supplies...:wow

it's doesn't get any better:thumb:
 

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Lightning
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Discussion Starter #4
What is the highest point on the island?
Hmm, not counting any man made structures, I'm guessing only a few feet. Maybe 5 or 6, at best.

There are private houses on the island though, built on "stilts", which are made to last through storms. The floors of those houses are probably 15 feet above sea level.
 

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Lightning
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Discussion Starter #5
I watched the video and read your post. I just wanted to say you have youth, pretty girls, boats, supplies...:wow

it's doesn't get any better:thumb:
HA

Thanks. Ya it wasn't much of a "**** hit the fan" situation, but the idea was there, and I think it provided a good look at how people respond away from every day convinces (some anyway), how people respond under pressure, who is self sufficient, who is responsible, and how my prep items panned out in real time (sling shot, knife, flash lights,tweezers, coconut oil, etc).
 

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When I watched that video, the whole time I was thinking...horror movie.
You get a bunch of mixed sex youth folk on an island accessible only by boat, with a shaky camera?
Horror movie.
But I"m glad it didn't turn out that way.
 
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