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(Earlier,I accidentally posted this at the end of another thread,instead of starting a new one. OOPS:rolleyes:)

We have a semi-decent stash of cured,split oak firewood, and last Thanksgiving I grabbed some for a fire. I noticed that termites had turned a 10 pound hunk of wood into balsa. I went to the Wally world, and they had NOTHING for termites. I don't want to have to call Dale Gribble if there's a cheaper,easier option available. Can I just sprinkle the whole pile with borax?? Any help much appreciated....M.
 

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(Earlier,I accidentally posted this at the end of another thread,instead of starting a new one. OOPS:rolleyes:)

We have a semi-decent stash of cured,split oak firewood, and last Thanksgiving I grabbed some for a fire. I noticed that termites had turned a 10 pound hunk of wood into balsa. I went to the Wally world, and they had NOTHING for termites. I don't want to have to call Dale Gribble if there's a cheaper,easier option available. Can I just sprinkle the whole pile with borax?? Any help much appreciated....M.
Try boric acid:

http://www.dirtdoctor.com/organic/garden/view_question/id/51/
 

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Rebel with a cause
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Diesel fuel. Use a pump up garden sprayer and spray the wood in the rack. After a week most of the smsll is gone. No spiders, roaches, mice, wood borers or termites. You can cut 1/2" building black board into 6x6 peieces and soak in diesel - after it air dries for a few weeks, almost no smell and a super fire starter for the fireplace.
 

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VA / NC
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Home Depot and Lowes actually carry a termite killer now that you spray around the exterior of homes after digging a shallow trench to spray the chemical into. May want to try it.
 

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Preparing since 1972
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(Earlier,I accidentally posted this at the end of another thread,instead of starting a new one. OOPS:rolleyes:)

We have a semi-decent stash of cured,split oak firewood, and last Thanksgiving I grabbed some for a fire. I noticed that termites had turned a 10 pound hunk of wood into balsa. I went to the Wally world, and they had NOTHING for termites. I don't want to have to call Dale Gribble if there's a cheaper,easier option available. Can I just sprinkle the whole pile with borax?? Any help much appreciated....M.
IF other suggestions do not work........Call or visit your local County Extension office (look in your phone book in the front pages under county government offices)....Every county has one to help with pest control and to control weeds.......IF the typical sprays do not work look again to the county extension office and see if you can take a test to apply for a state permit/license to apply chemicals...The state permit will then allow you to buy professional poisons to apply for the various pests that you may have...........................................You would not believe what lives in your walls and crawl space especially in older homes......On a hot summer night go outside after it's been dark a few hours and you can find all kinds of insects especially spiders that come out looking for their meals.....Good luck...
 

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Christian for Israel
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Contact your county extension service.

Be sure to tell them that this is FIREWOOD. I would NOT use any of the common chemicals formulated for termite control. Remember, as you burn this wood, you will be introducing toxic compounds into your home. :eek: And people complained about Fema trailers. Many of thes chemicals can injure/kill you and yours.
 

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I see a bad moon arising
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Ditto on the termite control chemicals being available at the big box hardware stores.

I used to hose down my firewood stack but then I started to worry about
the same concerns that UGA1983 brought up, so I quit spraying and just
let the bugs have their way with the wood pile. (I figure I get my revenge
when I toss them in the fire. :D:)

A couple of things on termites: First of all, they're everywhere, you just
usually don't see them. Guy that treated my house for termites years
ago told me there's two types of houses (in the midwest) -- those that
have termites, and those that are going to have termites. In fact, if you
see your neighbor treating for them, watch out, they may bug out of
their now unpleasant home and head your direction. And second, any of
the termite treatments you get these days (professional or do-it-yourself)
doesn't actually kill most of the little buggers. It just makes their environment
unpleasant and they find somewhere else to be. You might be able to
render you firewood pile toxic for a while, but the termites will just migrate
elsewhere. To actually kill them off, you need the old-school toxins like
chloridane (sp?) but that stuff stays in the ground (and groundwater) for
ages, so maybe it's a good thing they banned it's use. The new treatments
are good for up to 10 years at best.

Good luck. Probably the best thing you can do is stack your firewood a
decent distance from your house, and find other things to worry about.
 

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Oak is only good for 3-4 yrs MAX under ideal conditions..just burn it up..
If you want longer term firewood get yourself some Locust...Stuff lasts damn near forever...Oh yeah, and make sure you store your wood AWAY from your home..i.e. a property line.. My 02. BeSwift
 

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Adventurer
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one thing you can do is make a metle stand of some sorts to keep the wood from direct contact with the ground that should keep the termits for gettin in
 

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Preparing since 1972
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Contact your county extension service.

Be sure to tell them that this is FIREWOOD. I would NOT use any of the common chemicals formulated for termite control. Remember, as you burn this wood, you will be introducing toxic compounds into your home. :eek: And people complained about Fema trailers. Many of thes chemicals can injure/kill you and yours.
Whatever your firewood has eventually your home and building will have...It is especially important to know the area where your firewood comes from...
 

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I'm not as familiar with the termites of the South, but I was a home inspector/pest inspector in WA state for 6 years. There are a couple types of termites... dampwood and subterranean. I'm guessing you're talking about the sub-t's. This type of termite lives in hives deep underground (20+/- feet) in colonies of as many as several million. They create hollow tubes between the ground and their food source (they digest cellulose/wood) to provide the environment necessary for survival (it keeps them moist). The only way to protect your wood (and your house) is to create a barrier between the ground and the wood. This is what a termite treatment should be creating... a chemical barrier between the wood and the hive. Different chemicals require different treatment techniques, but essentially the technician will inject a specific amount of chemical a specific depth underground, at specific intervals. These treatments can last for several years, but will require re-application regularly (again, based on the chemical used).

Good luck,
G'dood
 

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You'd likely be using boric acid, not borax, and that works for carpenter ants [which we had a problem with] and is stated by these folks to be effective as an insecticide. The stuff we got for carpenter ants is specifically boric acid, not borax.
 

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Wide awake
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Hey brother, I've tried boric acid for ants in my last home, and it did exactly squat. At first, the ants didn't want to walk through it, but after some time, they ended up making trails right through it. This went on for days to no avail. I actually tried a couple of other "remedies" that seemed to kill off part of the population, only to yield to their return shortly thereafter.

Diatomaceous earth however, worked a small miracle for me in terms of eradicating my ant population (although there could always be a difference between how termites react to it). When I used it, it killed my ant population, and they didn't manage to return for the remainder of the summer. (Admittedly, I did move before the next seasons, so I can't verify if it was truly a permanent solution.)

Diatomaceous earth is made of ground sea shells. Interestingly, it forms tiny particles with razor sharp edges when crushed. The particles actually cut through the exo-skeleton of almost any insect, killing them with some pretty amazing regularity. Its actually pretty neat.
 

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Diatomaceous earth is actually old diatoms (tiny sea creatures) that died and sank to the bottom of the sea. These built up into sand-like layers on the sea floor. Now we collect them and turn them into floor dry. I think the reason it kills ants (and fleas) is that it absorbs all the moisture from them, essentially dehydrating them.

Borates, applied to the surface of wood, is an approved (by WSDA, in charge of pesticide applications, etc) method of treating installed lumber in crawlspaces of houses. It is approved to prevent re-infestation of wood-boring beetles, such as the golden buprestid or anobiidae (false powder-post beetle). I don't think it would be useful as a termite prevention in a firewood application, but I'm not certain.

good luck,
G'dood
 

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Wide awake
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"Diatomaceous Earth is made up of the silicate shells of microscopic sea creatures called diatoms. With it's microscopic razor sharp edges, diatomaceous earth when spread in your garden or field physically kills and deters without the use of harmful poisons."
http://www.dirtworks.net/Diatomaceous-Earth.html

"it is formed from the remains of microscopic organisms that lived in the water and had hard outer silica shells like glass.... ...it does not kill due to a chemical action like most toxic poisons but rather kills by the structure of its sharp microscopic edges. The hard bodies of the pests are sliced open by the material and it literally drys them out and they die." http://www.ehow.com/how_5049476_use-earth-safely-pest-control.html
 

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enlightened
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I recommend getting some wooden pallets. You can treat the wood of the pallet with the termite killer and then stack your wood on top of the pallet. This raises your wood off the ground, and gives it a base that the termites cannot attack.
 

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I recommend getting some wooden pallets. You can treat the wood of the pallet with the termite killer and then stack your wood on top of the pallet. This raises your wood off the ground, and gives it a base that the termites cannot attack.
I've seen mud tubes that ran the the entire height of a concrete basement wall... I doubt the 6" or so of clearance would stop any activity.

G'dood
 
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